How many of you married doctors? - page 7

Hi all! I'm currently a student at Johns Hopkins SON, just starting, and I'm wondering how hard it will be to meet and date some of the male med students here to seek out future husbands. Don't... Read More

  1. by   OBNURSEHEATHER
    Originally posted by sbic56
    she was looking for advice from what she thought would be wise and supportive nurses. Sure didn't get that did she?

    And what's with the "stay out of nursing" crap?
    The wise supportive nurses did give her their advice - we told her to get real!

    And the stay out of nursing crap? Well, it's not that we think she won't make a good nurse. It's just good nurse or not, most nurses are tired of being portrayed in a light that this poster seems to want to perpetuate.

    Heather
  2. by   sbic56
    OBNURSEHEATHER

    I see what you are saying, but that "60's nurse" mentallity where the nurse goes into the profession just to find her doctor husband has already pretty much gone by the wayside. That is obvious by the responses here! I think that piece of advice to stay away from nursing was way too harsh and hurtful to the original poster. I'm thinking we could've been a little kinder and gentler toward her...especially where she is new to the boards and so young. It's a little thing called tact.
  3. by   imenid37
    wow! i am sorry, but you are a tad bit shallow jhu. just goes to prove you don't have to have common sense to go to a prestigious institution. good luck w/ your nursing courses. there's a lot more to nursing school than dating a med student and a lot of great guys out there who are and aren't docs. if you're only 19, i'd say have fun, use safe-sex practices (no mater who you're with), and be careful down there in that bad neighborhood in east baltimore. so glad i am not 19 anymore, it's a scary world out there!
  4. by   Sleepyeyes
    Originally posted by sbic56
    OBNURSEHEATHER

    I see what you are saying, but that "60's nurse" mentallity where the nurse goes into the profession just to find her doctor husband has already pretty much gone by the wayside. That is obvious by the responses here! I think that piece of advice to stay away from nursing was way too harsh and hurtful to the original poster. I'm thinking we could've been a little kinder and gentler toward her...especially where she is new to the boards and so young. It's a little thing called tact.
    How "harsh and hurtful" is she going to feel if she has her priorities too screwed up to get through the program? Whatta waste! Better someone's honest with her here and now than have her go through it at clinicals.
  5. by   nella-pea
    Honey, if you EVEN want to have some semblance of a life of your own after you get married, don't bark up that tree. You'll have the $$, but you'll also have total responsibility for the kids (diapers and all-nighters when they're babies, band practice and soccer when they're older), bills, running the house, planning the vacations, etc, and MABYE you'll be able to work when they get in middle school. Sounds like a single parent to me. If your plans involve having an au pair, that defeats the absolute joy of having the kids.....it's not worth the trade-off.

    You sound like my old roomie right after we graduated--she would only look at men who made over 80 grand (alot in 1980!!). She's still not married....wonder why..........
  6. by   LasVegasRN
    Originally posted by sbic56
    OBNURSEHEATHER

    I see what you are saying, but that "60's nurse" mentallity where the nurse goes into the profession just to find her doctor husband has already pretty much gone by the wayside. That is obvious by the responses here! I think that piece of advice to stay away from nursing was way too harsh and hurtful to the original poster. I'm thinking we could've been a little kinder and gentler toward her...especially where she is new to the boards and so young. It's a little thing called tact.
    I don't think this is the place to come for a "candy-coated" response. She wanted a real answer - it was given, several times by several different people in several different ways. If she can't handle honest responses here, she certainly won't be able to handle real life.
  7. by   Sleepyeyes
    Originally posted by LasVegasRN

    I don't think this is the place to come for a "candy-coated" response. She wanted a real answer - it was given, several times by several different people in several different ways. If she can't handle honest responses here, she certainly won't be able to handle real life.
    Or real Codes....
  8. by   WalMart_ADN
    Originally posted by sbic56
    Geez, peers...
    What happened to being nonjudgemental? Could it be she is 19 and being appropriately naive

    uhh....that's not naive...that's dumb. I am 19 and did not go to nursing school, work my a$$ off, lose touch with all my friends from HS, to end up with the ultimate goal of marrying a dr.! If she is old enough/mature enough to think she is ready to handle being in nursing school, she is old enough/mature enough to realize she will NOT HAVE TIME TO DATE MED STUDENTS!!
    Last edit by WalMart_ADN on Jul 8, '02
  9. by   LasVegasRN
    Originally posted by WalMart_ADN
    uhh....that's not naive...that's dumb. I am 19 and did not go to nursing school, work my a$$ off, lose touch with all my friends from HS, to end up with the ultimate goal of marrying a dr.! If she is old enough/mature enough to think she is ready to handle being in nursing school, she is old enough/mature enough to realize she will NOT HAVE TIME TO DATE MED STUDENTS!!
    See? No candy coating around here!

    oh, did that tickle me!
  10. by   sbic56
    Sorry, some of you, I still don't cater to your thinking. She deserved better than she got. Very few here would have ganged up on her like that in real life (thank goodness); it's so much easier on these boards, though. We can be so critical of our own. I get really pissed at myself sometimes, as I know I am guilty of it, too. I'm trying to quit, though!! We are eating our young and starving the profession.
  11. by   imenid37
    walmart, i would much rather work w/ you than the slightly more self-absorbed jhu! it's called priorities. some people never move beyond themselves when it comes to priorities and that is not age dependent, i do agree. sometimes it gets better. often not.

    i think as far as doc's and med students go, those at jhu consider themselves elite and have had their egos super-sized several times, as a rule. many would not bother w/ a lowly nursing student. this not to mention that those students and residents are in a very rigorous program and also would not have a lot of time to date anyway. if you want a dr's income, why not become one yourself, hmmm?
  12. by   JeannieM
    OK, here goes another nasty, unsupportive post. If I had this young woman as one of my "young", I probably would eat her! As I said, I could be the Nursing Instructor from Hell, and I have had 19-year-olds in my office with an attitude like this. I would then proceed to tell them to get their act and priorities straight or get out! I think my attitude came because the majority of 19 year olds I deal with are mature, intelligent and motivated like WalMart_ADN, and make me proud to welcome them into my profession. I've had single parents, students working their way through at McDonalds, and students caring for sick family members while going to school. I've given my pager # to GNs and accepted calls at all hours, because I felt that if they were motivated enough to call me, then they deserved help.
    If this young woman has what it takes to enter this profession, this message board will have helped her to wake up and turn around. I sincerely hope that the maturity she manifested in her second post is more indicative of her capabilities than the tone of her first. Allnurses are a great, supportive and patient-advocating group of nurses, and we should be proud of our exacting standards. JeannieM
  13. by   t2000JC
    Um...if you really want to be "set" maybe you should marry a guy in finance or something. MDs do earn a good living, but with resident salaries, med school loans, and malpractice insurance, it takes a while to finally be living the good life, and they pay their dues with all those long hours and draining work conditions.

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