How long are you a "Graduate" Nurse

  1. 0
    I hope this doesn't sound like a dumb question... How long are you considered a Graduate Nurse. I thought it was the time between you graduate and pass your NCLEX.

    I graduated in January, passed the boards in March... Been looking for a job in hospitals ever since (with no luck) Can I still apply to Graduate Nurse positions, Intern positions....ect.?

    Thanks,
    Bea
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  3. 10 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    You are right. After you graduate and before you pass NCLEX. Someone who fails NCLEX is no longer a GN.
  5. 0
    I remmber getting getting a tour of a unit as a student. Our guide introduced us to one nurse saying "oh, and this is nurse "Shelly" one of our new grads. She been with us alittle over three years"

    I felt like i would NEVER be a real nurse!
  6. 0
    When used as a legal term, this varies from state to state. In some places it's a temporary license that must be applied for. In others it may be automatically conferred after graduation.

    After it is received, the usual situation is that it expires, a) after the nurse passes NCLEX and earns her RN license, b) after the nurse fails the NCLEX, or c), 90 days passes from the date of issuance.

    For a nurse to hold a temporary license, there must be the presumption that she will be able to pass NCLEX when she takes it. If she does not pass, that presumption is no longer valid and she is no longer allowed to work as a GN.

    But, as I said, check with your state BON to be certain you are following their rules and regs.
  7. 0
    so.... does this mean I shouldn't apply to any jobs that say "graduate Nurse" positions. Or to a Graduate Nurse program.... ?
  8. 3
    Used as a more informal term, "graduate nurse" may mean someone has passed NCLEX (and therefore is an RN) who has yet to find her first nursing job. "Graduate nurse" may indicate a willingness to provide longer orientation and better support. But don't quote me on that.

    In this economy, I would apply for anything that seems even remotely appropriate.

    Best wishes with your search.
    melmarie23, chicookie, and MMARN like this.
  9. 0
    Graduate nurse is otherwise known as a new grad nurse. You should apply to any GN or New grad positions. You are a new grad from the time you graduate til in some places, a year of experience.
  10. 0
    Quote from CharlieTaco
    Graduate nurse is otherwise known as a new grad nurse. You should apply to any GN or New grad positions. You are a new grad from the time you graduate til in some places, a year of experience.
    I graduated and became a GN. Then, I passed NCLEX and became an RN. However, when I start my first nursing job next week I'll still be considered a "new grad," thankfully. That's how it is here...
  11. 0
    Quote from KaksRN
    I graduated and became a GN. Then, I passed NCLEX and became an RN. However, when I start my first nursing job next week I'll still be considered a "new grad," thankfully. That's how it is here...
    but not a GN...
  12. 0
    Some states/hospitals have GN positions available.. This is someone who has graduated school but not yet passed boards.. Tricky how they can play with words.. I was a new grad after passing boards and landing my first job.. I was considered a new grad for 6 months then the term changed again to new nurse lol meaning less than a year experience..

    If the position is for new grad internships, positions, etc.. I would apply.. If it is for a GN ask them if you will still qualify if you already have your license.. I would apply for everything you can find, even if it said "experience preferred"..


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