How important is it for a Charge Nurse to be able to run a code? - page 3

by ~*Stargazer*~ 4,092 Views | 25 Comments

Another thread here today got me thinking. On a scale of 0 to 10, with 0 being totally unimportant and 10 being absolutely essential, how important is it for a charge nurse to be able to run a code? Are there other leadership... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** I take it for granted that an experienced ICU RN can handel any role in any code situation. We don't call codes in our ICUs either, nor to they call RRT. My comments were in relation to a tele floor where the OP works.
    Even on the ICU/CCUs that I worked on, we always called the codes so the ER doc and RRT would respond. If it was an impending problem that had not gotten to the point of a code yet, we always just called the ER doc for intubation if needed or informed the attending or specialist. I have actually worked with ICU nurses that had no clue where or what things were in the crash cart though, which was very sad. Sometimes, they had been there longer than I. That is another reason that I always made sure that I was familiar with the procedures.

    Christy, RN
  2. 0
    Heck I just re-upped my BLS, some nurses fumbled severly even with the CPR practice, and then were still working on the written test, or were being educated on things they got wrong by the instructors after I left ?! These were nurses with many years experience. This is basic response folks.

    ...and some of us can't get a break for a hospital job.
  3. 1
    It could be that he/she struggled because it was a class and not the real thing. I've gone through a class with a nurse who has been an lpn for over 30 years and the way she acted and responded to questions and during mock code would make you think it was time to retire. But in actual codes she is totally different. In fact, she will tell the doctor what they need to do. There is something about having to perform in front of people in those acls classes that some people cannot handle. I would think (and hope) that the charge nurse has made it this far for a reason.
    wooh likes this.
  4. 1
    I work nights on a tele floor at a 350 bed hospital. A few weeks ago we had the craziest night I've ever seen. Two code blues, a code stroke, a RRT, and a trauma roll up to the ED all within an hour. Spread out over different floors, of course...if all those happened in one night on my floor I'd still be gibbering in the corner!

    So, yeah, a charge should be able to theoretically run a code if necessary...on tele floors and up at least, since our med-surg nurses aren't ACLS certified. Even at that, by the time the code team shows up, basics should all be done...CPR, suction, NS up and running, pads on, etc...no matter what floor or area you're talking about.

    IMHO, no one should be thrust into the charge role without significant experience under their belt. My facility requires a year as a RN, which I don't think is anywhere near enough time to be comfortable dealing with emergent situations, b/c there's just not been a chance to get enough experience. Minimum should be participating in several code blues and code strokes if you're talking the acute care side of things. There's nothing worse than the blind leading the blind until the calvary arrives.
    netglow likes this.
  5. 1
    Quote from NevRN912
    It could be that he/she struggled because it was a class and not the real thing. I've gone through a class with a nurse who has been an lpn for over 30 years and the way she acted and responded to questions and during mock code would make you think it was time to retire. But in actual codes she is totally different. In fact, she will tell the doctor what they need to do. There is something about having to perform in front of people in those acls classes that some people cannot handle. I would think (and hope) that the charge nurse has made it this far for a reason.
    This is me. Imagining all the parts of the scenario takes up brain space that in real life I'd be using to fix the patient. I'm a VERY visual person. And not at all auditory. The scenarios KILL me. I need to see the person, see the symptoms. Hearing them doesn't register for me at all, so renewal kills me. I rock on the floor. I rock the written exam. I suck at scenarios. I saw an RT struggle with a PALS recert that is one of the people I'd want in the room if a patient was actually crumping. And I've seen people that rock the scenarios that suck in the real life situation. So from experience, I don't judge based on how people do in scenarios.

    That said, I think it all depends on facility. Previous facility, charge from each floor would respond to the code. We'd never be the ones running the code though, that would be the ER doc. I think being comfortable in the situation is all we really needed there.
    Current facility, there's an entire code team, and only the primary nurse stays in the room. Here, I think being able to get things ready for the code team is what's needed, definitely don't need to run the code because most of the time won't be in the room.

    It seems a lot of people are taking glee in how much better they are at coding patients than other nurses. Personally, I take pride in my ability to keep my patients from reaching the point where they are coding.
    SweetOldWorld likes this.
  6. 0
    Just a curiosty aside.......... any trained monkey can do chest compressions. All staff in my hospital are refreshed on CPR every year. So I'd have a porter or CA doing compressions. I can do it...but they cannot insert IV's, hang fluids, insert an LMA. Having a nurse compressing is a waste. Get a CA or student to do it.


Top