How do you incorporate faith into your daily nursing tasks? - page 9

The question is pretty much self-explanatory. I'm getting my BSN in a faith-based, private university with their own hospital. I've observed that there's such a huge difference between nurses who incorporate their faith into... Read More

  1. 2
    Quote from cogath
    I am an atheist, and the way I incorporate my lack of faith is respect, acceptance, caring, and nonjudgemental attitude. I do not make assumptions and I respect all people regardless of their faith. I do not judge as right or wrong people based on their decision about who to love, what to do with their unborn child, what religion they are, or how to live their life. At work and in my daily life I do my best keep the "rights and wrongs" to myself. Each person has this one life on earth, and that is their sole opportunity to do as they wish. They may live it as they choose, and it is not my position to judge them as a nurse or impose my beliefs on them either. At work, my patients are free to make their own choices and I will support them. I have worked with the demented, mentally handicapped, homeless, wefare mothers with many kids, alcoholics, women who are having abortions, pot smokers and obese. I remember everyone of them and I am proud about the way I treated them with respect and helped them and listened to their stories because they are people, and that is their life.

    Peace and love.
    I applaud your positive post Cogath! Nice to know that there are great people like you out in the world, that don't judge, belittle, or mock other's beliefs (even if it doesn't necessarily fit their lifestyle). As a person of faith, I would actually prefer someone like you caring for me, as opposed to a judgmental believer, or a condescending athiest. You have my respect.
    Last edit by Trilldayz,RN BSN on May 4, '11
    yai J, RN and Purple_Scrubs like this.

    Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  2. 1
    Quote from orangepink
    The question is pretty much self-explanatory. I'm getting my BSN in a faith-based, private university with their own hospital. I've observed that there's such a huge difference between nurses who incorporate their faith into their nursing job compared to others who do not. So in what ways, do you incorporate your faith into your work?
    evangelising has no place in healthcare. you are doing the work of ' the higher power' by practising your profession, it is also onerous when hospital chaplains attempt to find out the stated religion of patients ( sadly there's one particular Christian denomination who consistantly gets into trouble for this ... here's a hint it';s the one who won't share communion outside their little club )

    supporting the spiritual needs of patients is a very important part of working in healthcare, and if this means taking time to pray with a patient then so be it - but it must be at the request of the patient , but do not force the views of your own beliefs on to patients ...
    FranEMTnurse likes this.
  3. 0
    Wow Cogath you are spot on!!! This is exacly the philosophy that my school teaches. I truly hope that I can be a nurse cut from a similar cloth as you

    Cheers!!!
  4. 2
    cogath - Thank you for your eloquent post. There needs to be better representation of the secular community out there, too many people have the idea that atheists are somehow morally deficient. I hope to also be a part of busting that myth!
    Maseca and DavidFR like this.
  5. 3
    How do I incorporate faith in my practice? Well, I pray every morning before I get to work, sometimes if I don't quite make the prayer in my rush to get to work, I pray when I get to my desk. I usually ask for guidance and patience, and for the ability to do the best I can for my patients. I also pray for my unit, manager and staff members.
    casi, nurse.sandi, and kakamegamama like this.
  6. 3
    Quote from orangepink

    While I've noticed (for example) this one nurse, who do not pray with her patients, was viewed as rough and uncaring by her patients.

    That's actually way more presumptive and offensive than the original post.

    The meanest nurse I've ever met was aggressively religious, although I don't correlate her being mean with her being openly religious any more than I would correlate her having blonde hair with being mean, she was just mean. I think those who are more reserved about their faith are just as capable of being kind and demonstrate that every day, just as people who are more open about their faith are just as capable of being uncaring.

    If how caring you are is related to how open you are about your faith and the degree to which you share your beliefs with others, then the members of the Westboro Baptist Church are the nicest people ever.
    Last edit by MunoRN on May 4, '11
  7. 0
    Quote from orangepink

    whoa.
    time out.
    this is getting out of hand.
    let's take a moment first.


    i posted this last night and from what i've read....geez. yes, i should have elaborated. what i meant was:

    i noticed some nurses incorporate their faith by praying with their patients together. for example, when one patient was admitted into our unit, one cna took time out to offer a prayer with the patient and her husband. as i observed, that really meant a lot to the patient.

    while i've noticed (for example) this one nurse, who do not pray with her patients, was viewed as rough and uncaring by her patients.

    so i thought that perhaps it is because that cna incorporates her faith into her work.



    i should have elaborated further. i apologize if people read too much into it and got carried away with your assumptions.



    exactly. thank you for saying that out loud. it was not my intention to take this into that sort of direction.
    so, all of this was based on the actions of "this one nurse"? from your op, you made it sound like you've seen many examples of differences in how care is delivered based on whether or not a nurse is a person of faith.
  8. 5
    Quote from orangepink
    while i've noticed (for example) this one nurse, who do not pray with her patients, was viewed as rough and uncaring by her patients.
    wow. and i really mean wow. i do not pray with my patients. am i to assume my patients feel i am "rough and uncaring?" seriously?!

    i actually have a "faith" which i practice privately. i would never presume to practice my religion on the job in any obvious way, however, because i know this may make a patient feel uncomfortable and might well be construed as inappropriately breaching professional boundaries.

    bottom line, i do not believe for one minute that patients as a rule would ever conclude that a nurse is "rough and uncaring" simply because s(he) did not offer to pray with or over a patient. that sounds like major projection to me.
    VanLpn, yai J, RN, shananigansWI, and 2 others like this.
  9. 3
    I have had several patients that were believing God for their complete healing and the Lord used me to pray for those patients. As a result, they was healed. But, I have to walk in the Spirit and be led by the Holy Spirit before praying for anybody.
    martinalpn, FranEMTnurse, and shellyjel like this.
  10. 1
    Any thread that involves politics or faith is bound to get a little heated...

    But even though I am Catholic and work in a Catholic hospital, I know that not all of our patients are Catholic. I incorporate my faith in my decisions every day and how I act at my job, but I do not bring up religion unless the patient opens the door first. If a patient asks me about my faith or expresses that they are religious, I would then be okay to make comments like, "You have to put your trust in God," or offer to pray with the patient. If they don't mention it first, I incorporate my faith through my thoughts and prayers.
    martinalpn likes this.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top