How do you incorporate faith into your daily nursing tasks? - page 6

The question is pretty much self-explanatory. I'm getting my BSN in a faith-based, private university with their own hospital. I've observed that there's such a huge difference between nurses who... Read More

  1. Visit  kakamegamama} profile page
    0
    OCNRN63--And,you are entitled to your opinion, as I am mine.
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  3. Visit  DavidFR} profile page
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    Quote from kakamegamama
    DavidFR--you are entitled to your opinion, as I am mine.
    Agreed on that, but that doesn't in any way address the points I raised in answer to your post.
  4. Visit  BacktoBasics} profile page
    2
    I often pray for God to use me for His work, to let me be His hands and feet. I work within an ICU so times can be kinda stressful (from both sick patients or from the nurse stuff we have to put up with). But it's my faith knowing that God is always with me and will never give me more than what I can handle that keeps me going. I try to be humble about what I do because it's not about me. I'll read scripture at work for strength. One thing that I need to work on is participating with my patients and their faith. I've been asked only once to pray with them. Most of the time, I just put a call out to the Chaplin so my role as the nurse doesn't get confused or boundaries crossed. I wish my nursing practice could be more of a ministry than work.
    casi and kakamegamama like this.
  5. Visit  eagle78} profile page
    0
    Quote from DavidFR
    Any nurse who prayed for me would be acting against my wishes and I would find it extremely offensive and most unwelcome. If a patient has said they are happy for you to pray for them that's great. Otherwise it's a no no IMHO.

    Would you be happy for a devil worshipper to perform some ritual on your behalf without your consent? A pagan nurse to make some gesture on your behalf? A Rastafarian nurse to smoke a joint for you in the hope you'll be released from Babylon? A communist nurse to get the comrades to sing a verse of the Internationale on your behalf? Your beliefs aren't necessarily your patients' beliefs and that's what should be respected. Even if they never have any knowledge of your actions it's at best patronising and at worst being done for yourself rather than for your patient. Pray for people who want your prayers. The "I can pray for them, it'll do them good even if they don't realise it" stance is a patronising stone that doesn't fly.
    Well your response may be exactly the reason for her question. Having faith you have to be cognizant of the patients perspective. I am a beliver and I also might pray for a person without their knowing it but I would never pray with them unless they requested it. So, to continue my theoretical view (it is mines ) I think she is wondering how do people handle incorporating their spiritual beliefs into the job. I am sure that is a question that could be asked in any field.

    As another poster said, "if you have spiritual practices how do you incorporate them into your work". I guess if that is not a question you want to answer, you don't have to.
  6. Visit  Turd Ferguson} profile page
    2
    Quote from DavidFR
    Any nurse who prayed for me would be acting against my wishes and I would find it extremely offensive and most unwelcome. If a patient has said they are happy for you to pray for them that's great. Otherwise it's a no no IMHO.

    Would you be happy for a devil worshipper to perform some ritual on your behalf without your consent? A pagan nurse to make some gesture on your behalf? A Rastafarian nurse to smoke a joint for you in the hope you'll be released from Babylon? A communist nurse to get the comrades to sing a verse of the Internationale on your behalf? Your beliefs aren't necessarily your patients' beliefs and that's what should be respected. Even if they never have any knowledge of your actions it's at best patronising and at worst being done for yourself rather than for your patient. Pray for people who want your prayers. The "I can pray for them, it'll do them good even if they don't realise it" stance is a patronising stone that doesn't fly.

    I wouldn't be happy, but I wouldn't be angry. If I didn't know about it then there's no way for me to have any sort of reaction to it... you can pray for your patients without anybody else on earth knowing about it. If I did know about it, I would appreciate the fact that my nurse was thinking of me, and then I would pray for them.
    Last edit by Turd Ferguson on May 3, '11
    Purple_Scrubs and kakamegamama like this.
  7. Visit  kakamegamama} profile page
    1
    DavidFR--sure--if those you mentioned want to do "their thing" over me, they can go ahead. I know Whom I believe and am persuaded that He is able to keep me from anything that anyone throws at me. And, how do you know that when I prayed for my patients it was for me & not them? Sorry you feel that praying for someone is patronising....I don't approach it that way at all.
    shellyjel likes this.
  8. Visit  orangepink} profile page
    1

    whoa.
    time out.
    this is getting out of hand.
    let's take a moment first.


    i posted this last night and from what i've read....geez. yes, i should have elaborated. what i meant was:

    i noticed some nurses incorporate their faith by praying with their patients together. for example, when one patient was admitted into our unit, one cna took time out to offer a prayer with the patient and her husband. as i observed, that really meant a lot to the patient.

    while i've noticed (for example) this one nurse, who do not pray with her patients, was viewed as rough and uncaring by her patients.

    so i thought that perhaps it is because that cna incorporates her faith into her work.

    Quote from nascar nurse
    it is this sentence that makes some defensive. it is easy to read it as "if you don't have faith you suck and couldn't possibly be as good of a nurse as someone with faith".
    i should have elaborated further. i apologize if people read too much into it and got carried away with your assumptions.

    Quote from droogiern
    the only offensive thing in this thread, to me, is how freaking touchy people become over wording. the op's question wasn't a speech that was pored over by speechwriters for hours; it seems to be an honest inquiry by someone looking for advice, not a cyber-beating over semantics.

    people need to seriously lighten up.
    exactly. thank you for saying that out loud. it was not my intention to take this into that sort of direction.
    kakamegamama likes this.
  9. Visit  orangepink} profile page
    1

    whoa.
    time out.
    this is getting out of hand.
    let's take a moment first.

    and i'm posting this for the 3rd time in case someone gets too "worked up" with my question.



    i posted this last night and from what i've read....geez. yes, i should have elaborated. what i meant was:

    i noticed some nurses incorporate their faith by praying with their patients together. for example, when one patient was admitted into our unit, one cna took time out to offer a prayer with the patient and her husband. as i observed, that really meant a lot to the patient.

    while i've noticed (for example) this one nurse, who do not pray with her patients, was viewed as rough and uncaring by her patients.

    so i thought that perhaps it is because that cna incorporates her faith into her work.

    Quote from nascar nurse
    it is this sentence that makes some defensive. it is easy to read it as "if you don't have faith you suck and couldn't possibly be as good of a nurse as someone with faith".
    i should have elaborated further. i apologize if people read too much into it and got carried away with your assumptions.

    Quote from droogiern
    the only offensive thing in this thread, to me, is how freaking touchy people become over wording. the op's question wasn't a speech that was pored over by speechwriters for hours; it seems to be an honest inquiry by someone looking for advice, not a cyber-beating over semantics.

    people need to seriously lighten up.
    exactly. thank you for saying that out loud. it was not my intention to take this into that sort of direction.
    kakamegamama likes this.
  10. Visit  hiddencatRN} profile page
    8
    Quote from orangepink

    whoa.
    time out.
    this is getting out of hand.
    let's take a moment first.


    i posted this last night and from what i've read....geez. yes, i should have elaborated. what i meant was:

    i noticed some nurses incorporate their faith by praying with their patients together. for example, when one patient was admitted into our unit, one cna took time out to offer a prayer with the patient and her husband. as i observed, that really meant a lot to the patient.

    while i've noticed (for example) this one nurse, who do not pray with her patients, was viewed as rough and uncaring by her patients.

    so i thought that perhaps it is because that cna incorporates her faith into her work.



    i should have elaborated further. i apologize if people read too much into it and got carried away with your assumptions.



    exactly. thank you for saying that out loud. it was not my intention to take this into that sort of direction.
    from your clarification, it doesn't seem to me that the assumptions were way off....
    flyingchange, yai J, RN, OCNRN63, and 5 others like this.
  11. Visit  DavidFR} profile page
    0
    Quote from Turd Ferguson
    I wouldn't be happy, but I wouldn't be angry.

    Quote from kakamegamama
    DavidFR--sure--if those you mentioned want to do "their thing" over me, they can go ahead. .
    And this is where we differ. None of those people could do "their thing" over me without it being most unwelcome. Some people dislike religion for their own valid reasons and do not want to be prayed for. It kinda seems as if you guys aren't prepared to respect that. One of the basics of my nursing practice is that of patient consent and respecting their wishes - and that includes the things they don't get to find out about.
  12. Visit  Turd Ferguson} profile page
    1
    DavidFR- what if one of your patient's wishes was that you prayed with them?
    iteachob likes this.
  13. Visit  kakamegamama} profile page
    0
    Well, DavidFR, I guess we agree to disagree. I won't change your mind and you won't change mine. And, that's okay.
    Last edit by kakamegamama on May 3, '11 : Reason: misspelled word
  14. Visit  DavidFR} profile page
    6
    Quote from Turd Ferguson
    DavidFR- what if one of your patient's wishes was that you prayed with them?

    I would explain politely that it's not a normal part of the nurses role, just the same as if a patient wanted me to meet them socially, share a beer or a cigarette with them in the room, sit down and have my dinner with them in the room, go to their house with their keys to pick up something they'd forgotten, accept money or an expensive gift, lend them some cash, ask me to disclose the details of another patient, etc. etc. etc. Not being able to satisfy all of their wishes due to professional constraints is not the same as doing something for them without their consent.

    Would you take part in a devil worship ritual with a patient who wished you to do so? I wouldn't.

    If they persisted I would perhaps explain that some nurses who are Christian/Jewish/Moslem/Hindu/whatever may sometimes consent to pray with patients of their own or even another faith, but that that's a function outside our usual role performed at the nurses individual discretion, and that as an atheist I couldn't do it with sincerity. I would underline the religious services available to them and I would always ensure that their spiritual needs were met by ensuring access to a priest, rabbi, iman, whatever chaplain necessary to fulfil their religious needs. THAT'S part of my job, not taking on the function myself.
    Last edit by DavidFR on May 3, '11
    smartin13, jcbhappy, Fribblet, and 3 others like this.


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