How do you incorporate faith into your daily nursing tasks? - page 6

by orangepink 19,651 Views | 126 Comments

The question is pretty much self-explanatory. I'm getting my BSN in a faith-based, private university with their own hospital. I've observed that there's such a huge difference between nurses who incorporate their faith into... Read More


  1. 11
    Quote from medpro32
    Who cares? this isn't church. Do you think CPA's or any other proffesion would be concerned on how they "incorporate their faith" in their daily job?

    Just because you work somewhere named "Saint Whatever" doesn't mean you are one. Take the preaching somewhere else.
    As a matter of fact.....MANY CPA's and members of other professions do care. I know and respect quite a few.

    Your reply to the OP is completely out of line. I don't believe she is talking about preaching to anyone....just a way of life, an attitude. Why the hostility?

    (May I point out that responses like this might be the "difference" the OP speaks of?)
    ABM1227, martinalpn, DroogieRN, and 8 others like this.
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    Quote from medpro32
    Who cares? this isn't church. Do you think CPA's or any other proffesion would be concerned on how they "incorporate their faith" in their daily job?

    Just because you work somewhere named "Saint Whatever" doesn't mean you are one. Take the preaching somewhere else.

    I think you have missed the meaning of this thread; nobody is preaching, the OP is commenting that in their experience thusfar, nurses that incorporate their faith into their care are more effective. Then the OP poses the question of how you incorporate your faith into your job, the original post is not in any way accusing anybody of anything.
    martinalpn and kakamegamama like this.
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    Quote from DroogieRN
    Oh, please, just stop. "Us. vs. them" is ugly, and so is this. The OP asked a question. Answer it or move on. Do you ever have to ignore things that rub you the wrong way? I do, all the time. Do you imagine someone who has faith in God is going to be suddenly enlightened d/t your statement? Surely not.
    I had zero expectation my comment would change anyone's mind. A poster mentioned they have faith in science, and in my understanding of the words "faith" and "science" the two do not intersect. Sorry if I derailed the conversation into semantics, I have a BA in communication arts and spent a lot of time during my first round in college dissecting semiotics. Is clear communication not valuable?

    It does seem to me that the OP is indicating those that incorporate faith into their practice are somehow superior to those who don't. I disagree, but so what? Everyone is entitled to their opinion and can do as they please as long as they're not stepping on anyone's toes.
    Nascar nurse and hiddencatRN like this.
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    Quote from shananigansWI
    I had zero expectation my comment would change anyone's mind. A poster mentioned they have faith in science, and in my understanding of the words "faith" and "science" the two do not intersect.
    That's a great comment and we could have a good discussion in a thread of it's own about it. Faith and science usually do not go hand in hand as they are typically (and rightfully) regarded as two different things. Faith is a belief in things hoped for, meaning that you have no stone-cold proof that something is true but you still know that it is true. Science is the proof of things through factual analysis, meaning that you have the physical evidence in front of you and make inferences from it. However, it is completely possible and common to have a faith in God (or others, just to be PC), and a belief in what science proposes. The gray areas of science such as the evolution of man are usually a point of contention in the argument of intelligent design vs evolutionism. I believe in God with all my heart, but I also believe in the facts presented to us by science.

    Like the above poster, I don't want to step on anybody's toes but rather want to facilitate communication between opposing sides.

    So, to facilitate the discussion in this thread I will rephrase the question posed by the original poster:

    If you incorporate your faith into your nursing practice, how do you do it and what is the effect on your patient's care or your ability to do your job?
    martinalpn, DroogieRN, and kakamegamama like this.
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    Quote from orangepink
    the question is pretty much self-explanatory. i'm getting my bsn in a faith-based, private university with their own hospital. i've observed that there's such a huge difference between nurses who incorporate their faith into their nursing job compared to others who do not. so in what ways, do you incorporate your faith into your work?
    i do not think the op means to be offensive. i am reading her question as not to make a difference between those who have faith and those who do not have faith. i think the difference she is seeing is the way people who she believes have faith are incorporating it into their work. it may be that she is trying to say that some who she sees as having a spiritual faith are more outward with incorporating their faith in to the job than others who also have spiritual faith but do not necessarily outwardly incorporate it into the job. there may be some spiritual practices she is seeing incorporated in some instances and not others. i cannot see how she could make a difference between those who believe and those who don't because unless a person tells you that is not something you will know. good people come in all types of packages.

    maybe it is just me but i do not believe that she was saying there is a huge difference in the care that a person with faith gives compared to the care that person without faith gives. just my
    martinalpn and kakamegamama like this.
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    I've seen a whole lot of posts saying that the OP "didn't mean this" or "didn't mean that." Quite frankly, none of us have the information needed to say what the OP did or did not mean.

    Since the OP has not been back to clarify, it's really impossible to know what in the heck s(he) meant by the "huge difference" statement she made. Seems like a rather hit and run type post to me, but maybe she just has a lot of homework or is going through finals, and thought she would give us a lot of time to debate her vague statement; maybe she's sitting back enjoying the controversy, maybe she was deliberately inflammatory, who knows.
  7. 0
    Quote from kakamegamama
    Fribblet---it's hard to explain....personally, I have found that when I try to do anything on my own, without praying, without seeking wisdom, etc., I come up short. For me, it's a matter of letting God work in me and through me and if I don't consult Him or allow Him to work, I fail. Oh sure--I can be successful to a point on my own, but His best for me is far beyond any best I can give or do on my own. I don't know if that helps...as I said, it's hard to explain. I've noticed as well there is often a "certain something" when somene is practicing their faith in their work that is absent in other situations with folks who either don't have a faith or choose not to let it be part of their daily life. A "Sunday christan" so to speak.
    I thought no one knew the heart of a man but God. Pretty presumptuous to assume you know the hearts of your co-workers.
  8. 2
    OCNRN63--I don't know the hearts of my co-workers unless they share it. Didn't say I do. Only God knows the heart. However, there are teachings and commands that as a follower of Jesus, if one professes to follow, one should obey and carry out, and if they do, it does color how they work, how they treat others, how they live in general.
    martinalpn and shellyjel like this.
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    Quote from NurseLoveJoy88
    I pray for my patients

    I sincerely hope you have their prior consent.
    yai J, RN, Fribblet, shananigansWI, and 1 other like this.
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    DavidFR--one can pray for their patients without their consent, imo....however, one should have their consent to pray with their patients. I prayed for my patients as I walked up & down the halls, entering rooms, changing beds, whatever and however and whenever. That is something that can be done silently. I have prayed with patients--when they've asked, or in the case of newborn/ill infants, as I cared for them.
    DroogieRN, ABM1227, martinalpn, and 4 others like this.


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