how do i max my income as new grad - page 2

need help from experienced RNs on how i might maximize my salary and earning potential when i graduate as RN in May. Is it negotiable, do you have to take what they offer? What is the highest... Read More

  1. by   cardiacRN2006
    You could also find a Baylor job, and then work another job someplace else as a PRN.

    I did Baylor as a tech and loved it!
  2. by   focker-male nurse
    Thanks to all of you.
    I plan on working extra whan i get out.
    I was wondering does part time pay more than flexi?
    I have seen alot of 7 on7 off. you work 56 hour and get paid for 60 but that is bi weekly so you are only averaging 30 hours per week. Seems like that schedule would stink. I think i would rather work 3 twelve hour shifts and squeeze in a couple of 8 hr shift a week extra to make more money.
    what do yall think.

    matt
  3. by   Katnip
    You won't be eligible for OT until after your orientation. Make sure you get a good solid orientation.

    PRN and agency jobs tend to go to people with at least a year's experience.

    Working all those extra hours sounds good on paper, but it's really tough, especially when you're starting out.

    I think the weekend shift-night would probably be the best thing for you. You work 24 hours and get paid for 36, which qualifies you as fulltime. Then you can pick up shifts during the week as you need it.
  4. by   wooh
    thank you very much, cardiacrn. i swear, i don't want to get into the chip on the shoulder thing. i have no young to eat and if anyone tries to eat me, i'm not that sweet.
    Frankly, I'm not hungry. Before you start your orientation, you may want to figure out that when someone with experience questions what you say or do, it may be for reasons other that hunger. Past that, I'm just going to say, learn some respect for your med/surg coworkers. Because when they're good (and just as deserving of that "specialty" pay), you'll more often get your floor transfers before they've already coded. Making your job a lot easier.
  5. by   llg
    Quote from focker-male nurse
    Thanks to all of you.
    I plan on working extra whan i get out.
    I was wondering does part time pay more than flexi?
    I have seen alot of 7 on7 off. you work 56 hour and get paid for 60 but that is bi weekly so you are only averaging 30 hours per week. Seems like that schedule would stink. I think i would rather work 3 twelve hour shifts and squeeze in a couple of 8 hr shift a week extra to make more money.
    what do yall think.

    matt
    I think your plan sounds good and sensible. Sometimes people burn themselves out trying to maximize their income as a new grad. They agree to so many extra shifts, long stretches with no time off, schedules that don't give them rest and recovery time, etc. that they end up burned out, physically ill, and in marital trouble. That's not smart. The long term mimsery is not worth the short term financial gain.

    The transition from student to competent professional is a tough one for most people. Give yourself the best chance to succeed and you will be much better off (professionally, personally AND financially) in the long run. Choose the specialty that interests you most and a supportive work environment with nice people who will give you the best orientation possible. That will get your career off to a good start. It will give you a positive experience and a strong foundation you can build upon for the future.

    That's what you should be looking for in a first job. Don't sacrifice those things for a few dollars. After you have successfully made that transition and found your niche within nursing ... then if you want to push yourself a bit more to make more money, then that's your choice. You will be able to do so without risking your entire career because you'll know what you are doing by then.

    Oh ... and as you consider special packages such as Baylor plans, part time work, flex time, etc., look VERY CLOSELY at the benefits offered by each option. A lot of people don't pay enough attention to them. They look only at the hourly cash and fail to appreciate the long term financial effect of the benefits offered. Things like health insurance, paid vacations and sick time, retirement programs, dental insurance, disability insurance, etc. really add up to a lot of money.
    Last edit by llg on Dec 31, '06
  6. by   Mommy TeleRN
    To the OP - I sure hope Bham pays more than northern AL - yikes! I live in TN near the line and was quoted 15.50 hr. I'm staying in TN lol. Anyway - my advice is to find out not only STARTING base pay - but look at these things:

    differentials - some hospitals don't pay weekend diffs at all

    Weekender options - my hospital pays SIGNIFICANTLY more for strict weekend where you agree to work 24-32 hrs (pay is same, bennies are not) You can not get this premium until you have been there one year in your specialty - but if you know it's an option at a particular hospital you can get your foot in the door so that in a year it's an option.

    Perks - do any offer loan repayment if you have loans? That can add up to a couple $/hr extra if one hospital offers it and another doesn't.

    My plan is to work nights. I work as an intern on weekends and have become familiar with the weekender staff. HR says I can work weekends for a reg weekend diff (3.75/hr) just not be on the weekender program. So I'm going to try and persuade my nurse manager to let me precept with a weekender nurse so I can get that extra $ and also work my way into the weekender program which has a very nice income.
  7. by   wooh
    Weekend options are great if you have a lifestyle that will accomodate them. Realize you won't have a lot of the resources you have during the week though (whether days or nights). It makes it a little bit harder as a new grad. Of course, working nights in a podunk sort of hospital made me learn to be VERY resourceful, so there's good things to that too!
  8. by   focker-male nurse
    thank you all...
    very good advice.
    The weekend night shift may be a great start.
  9. by   ibnathan
    I will be starting my orientation Jan. 15th. My starting pay will be $24.75 an hr. After my 14 wk orientation I will be eligible for overtime, overtime at my hospital for the first 4hrs. it is regular time then double time after that. Also after orientation I will be on the night shift 7pm-7am there is a 10% shift differential for nights and if I work weekends which I probably will have too as a new grad it will be another 10%. I will probably work 4 days a wk and every once in awhile 5 days a wk. I have worked the night shift before for 2 1/2 years it can be vary taxing on your body and family life. Good Luck Focker!
  10. by   powernurse
    sign on bonuses can vary greatly for new grads...but can also depend on shift preference..... shopping for the best sign on was what many of my classmates did....some got 12,000 over 15 months !!!

    opting for the best eduation/experience is invaluable though....don't underestimate that....the pay eventually catches up to you if you can hold out a year or 2.....

    GOOD LUCK !!!
    Last edit by powernurse on Dec 31, '06 : Reason: meant 12,000 NOT 120000.....we'd all be fighting over that job wouldnt we? :D
  11. by   Barb101
    In Australia its set rates for each state with incremental rises each year .It depends on your years of experience. Some Aust states do have a slightly higher rate but it all tends to average out in the end.
  12. by   dansamy
    Umm....what's a Baylor plan/schedule/job??
  13. by   Tweety
    Good luck. Alabama isn't known for being in the area with highest incomes.

    I agree that overtime, night shift, is probably how you're going to max your income as a new grad. Where I work the weekend positions are only open to charge-capable RNs, so you might not qualify for a weekend only position.
    Last edit by Tweety on Dec 31, '06

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