How Did a BSN Help Your Career (Or Not)

  1. Please ... this is NOT an ADN vs. BSN thread. I don't want to go there.

    I am merely asking BSN nurses if they feel the bachelor's provided more career opportunities, or not. If so, what kind of career opportunities.

    Or, did you see more benefit by getting your master's?

    Also, for those who are currently working on their BSN, why did you decide to pursue it?

    Do you feel that the additional costs, time invested, lost overtime, etc. for the BSN was or will be worth it?

    Thanks.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Dec 20, '06
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  2. 87 Comments

  3. by   ZootRN
    Quote from lizz
    Please ... this is NOT an ADN vs. BSN thread. I don't want to go there.

    I am merely asking BSN nurses if they feel the bachelor's provided more career opportunities, or not. If so, what kind of career opportunities.

    Or, did you see more benefit by getting your master's?

    Also, for those who are currently working on their BSN, why did you decide to pursue it?

    Do you feel that the additional costs, time invested, lost overtime, etc. for the BSN was or will be worth it?

    Thanks.

    :typing
    I am working on my BSN for the only purpose of applying to CRNA school later on. It sucks to have full time job and study, but what you gonna do.
  4. by   mauxtav8r
    I'm a student, so maybe my opinions are not what you are looking for, but I know that at the hospital where I work the policy has changed recently. Anyone who is in any way a manager or supervisor must now have a BSN. This has resulted in a flurry of managerial types seeking RN to BSN or face getting bumped back to floor nursing. In future, no non-BSN candidates will be considered for supervisory positions.

    I work at a large hospital network in a medium-sized city.
  5. by   outcomesfirst
    BSN and eventually MSN did broaden my horizon and sharpen my critical thinking skills. Have worked in many areas, because I actively sought them. I know several staff RNs with MSNs who choose to be there. (Same pay etc - staff nursing pays as staff nursing - don't slam me about certification pays/tenure etc. All HRs have a budget and salary scope - and they stay there, no nurse is special in that regard) Outside of staff nursing, an RN will do little for you today or tomorrow. A BSN today will open new doors everywhere, managment, consulting, education, insurance, research, pharma, public health, policy - or completely outside healthcare - a college degree says "I can hack it". Go for it.
  6. by   wtbcrna
    Quote from lizz
    Please ... this is NOT an ADN vs. BSN thread. I don't want to go there.

    I am merely asking BSN nurses if they feel the bachelor's provided more career opportunities, or not. If so, what kind of career opportunities.

    Or, did you see more benefit by getting your master's?

    Also, for those who are currently working on their BSN, why did you decide to pursue it?

    Do you feel that the additional costs, time invested, lost overtime, etc. for the BSN was or will be worth it?

    Thanks.

    :typing
    Let's See:

    I was an CNA, then LVN, and then did an LVN to BSN program 6 years ago.

    What has the BSN done for me?

    Commissioned Officer in the USAF (only BSN/or higher degree allowed in the USAF, USN, and USPHS as commissioned officer)
    I will start CRNA school June 2007.

    A BSN doesn't make you better than your ADN/Diploma grads it just offers you more opportunities.
  7. by   NurseInTheWorks
    I am soon to be a BSN student. My reasoning for the BSN is two-fold. One being the hospital where I work only hires new grads with their BSN. I really want to stay at that hospital. Two being that someday I would like to go on for a Master's and will need the BSN as my stepping stone. There you have it! :spin:
  8. by   Jabramac
    I will finish my BSN this spring. I went for it looking to get into management. Since starting the program I have been keeping my eyes open at different job openings, and I see there are many that have sounded so interesting require a BSN. I also would like to open the door more to non nursing fields for the future.

    Even being in school I have already reaped some rewards. I was required to do a management job shadow and I chose to follow our VP of nursing, which allowed for some great networking. A supervisor position opened up that I took a chance and applied for and got. I know part of me getting that job was because I am in school persuing my BSN.

    I have to say, in addition to marketability, I really feel like I have learned a lot in this BSN program that goes way beyond nursing. It has motivated me to want to persue a masters.
  9. by   nurseangel47
    I take my nurses' cap off to you hard working gals *&guys! who work full time AND attend university classes to obtain your BSN, Masters, and ultimately perhaps that CRNA! Woot and :studyowl: :bowingpur
  10. by   VegRN
    I have a BSN and I definitely think it improved my clinical practice. The extra education in the way of critical thinking, research, management and problem solving was well worth it.
  11. by   Rme4life
    i guess i was going to graduate college before i picked the career path of nursing. i picked an education first (i always wanted to attend college) and then when i discovered i really wanted to be a nurse i looked into the schools that would offer this career path. i see it as an advantage even before graduating because i want to continue my education and when i decided to go back into the army, there was no conflict with the degree choice i made (they only accept bsn).
  12. by   smk1
    I am in an ADN program, but plan to immediately transfer after graduation for my BSN. My reasoning is that I want "all" doors open to me, and I want the edge to get those jobs that say "BSN preferred", another reason that has refocused my eyes back on the BSN, is that I know an ADN nurse who graduated from my school a couple of years ago who works at a local hospital in the float pool, she floats to ICU as well as other places and has been wanting go on days in the ICU, and has recently been told that they are going to all BSN nurses in the ICU. I have ICU as well as PACU and ER as major nursing interests for me at this point so hearing that makes me even more resolved to finish the BSN if possible.
  13. by   marilynmom
    I have always wanted a bachelors degree and personally wouldn't have been happy with anything less than that (I already have an associates in Biology), that is just a personal goal of mine.

    I definatly want to purse a masters degree in the future--NP or CNS--someday phd. I didn't want to get my ADN and then go back to school to finished my BSN, for me it just makes sense to get it all over with.

    I work in a Magnet hospital right now which prefers BSN and actually will hire a BSN RN over an associates --no way do I want any doors shut on me because of my degree status....this hospital has no nursing shortage (especially in specialty areas like ICU where I want to work), a Med/Surg RN here has only 4-5 patients (that says a lot to me), some of the other hospitals I have been in the floor nurses have on avg 9-10 patients each (no thanks), so I oviously want to stay in the hospital I am at now and need a BSN to stay competitive.

    I just like that I have a ton of options with a bachelors, even outside of nursing.
  14. by   S.T.A.C.E.Y
    I live in Canada, and BScN is now minimum for entry to practice here. No BScN = No new RN license as of 2005(?).

    Eventually I plan to get my MSN, as here having a BScN will no longer put you a step ahead of other new nurses...everyone will have one! MSN will likely become the preferred level for any management positions, should I ever decide I want one.

    I actually would not have even considered nursing as a career if it hadn't been for the degree!

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