How Did a BSN Help Your Career (Or Not) - page 7

Please ... this is NOT an ADN vs. BSN thread. I don't want to go there. I am merely asking BSN nurses if they feel the bachelor's provided more career opportunities, or not. If so, what kind of... Read More

  1. by   Gennaver
    Quote from lizz
    Please ... this is NOT an ADN vs. BSN thread. I don't want to go there.

    I am merely asking BSN nurses if they feel the bachelor's provided more career opportunities, or not. If so, what kind of career opportunities.

    ...
    Do you feel that the additional costs, time invested, lost overtime, etc. for the BSN was or will be worth it?

    Thanks.

    :typing
    Hello,
    I see from your comment, (about lost overtime) that you are questioning RNs who are going for BSN completion programs.

    My current program is entry level, (MS entry) and I am not loosing any overtime or RN salaried work because my Associates and Bachellors were not entry to Nursing degrees. I am not a nurse yet and not missing what I couldn't have.

    As an entry to nursing degree my master's should be very helpful, (as would a BSN or ADN entry degree) because without it I could not sit for the NCLEX-RN in the first place!

    Yet even if it was post RN I would think my Master's would be helpful too.

    I am still interested in learning and do not have any intention of stopping at this level either. Do I think it will help in nursing? For me, yes, (and personal perception is a major motivator in the benefit of pursueing higher degrees).
    Cheers,
    Gen
    edited due to poor wording and run on sentances!
    Last edit by Gennaver on Jan 13, '07
  2. by   Gennaver
    Quote from lizz
    Please ... this is NOT an ADN vs. BSN thread. I don't want to go there.

    I am merely asking BSN nurses if they feel the bachelor's provided more career opportunities, or not. If so, what kind of career opportunities.

    Or, did you see more benefit by getting your master's?

    ...

    Thanks.

    :typing
    Hello Lizz,

    And how do you feel about the bachelors and career opportunities and or getting your master's by the way?

    Gen
  3. by   Gennaver
    Quote from classicdame
    My immediate benefit from the BSN was an extra dollar/hour. But it also helped me view nursing as a profession, not just a job.
    This is a great post!

    A higher degree changes one's mentality from mere vocational training to perform a "job" to being a Professional.

    When someone asks, "why bother with a BSN or MSN...what good will it do you or what difference will it make?" it clearly screams of vocational mentality. I mean, if I just wanted a "job" then I'd have stayed back in food service or factory work or as a cna and so on.

    You said it clearly and succinctly.

    Obviously not everyone is interested in becoming a professional and do not see it as a benefit, (vocational mentality).
    Gen
    p.s. as a patient I would not want to be someone's mere job...
  4. by   loricatus
    $0.64 more per hour in the NE (no differential from working in the state I graduated from, though) and the ability to start on my Masters without having to take any more prereqs. Clinically, the ADN's were more prepared after school because I spent my last 6 months writing paper after paper rather than learning skills related to bedside nursing. :smilecoffeeIlovecof
  5. by   Tweety
    Quote from loricatus
    $0.64 more per hour in the NE (no differential from working in the state I graduated from, though) and the ability to start on my Masters without having to take any more prereqs. Clinically, the ADN's were more prepared after school because I spent my last 6 months writing paper after paper rather than learning skills related to bedside nursing. :smilecoffeeIlovecof

    No clinicals the last six months??? That is highly unusual. All the programs around here ADNs and BSNs are doing clinicals/preceptorships up until they walk down the aisle.

    Sorry. Off topic. I just found that interesting. Carry on with the original topic of how a BSN has helped an individual person, or not helped.
  6. by   zahryia
    Quote from Gennaver
    This is a great post!

    A higher degree changes one's mentality from mere vocational training to perform a "job" to being a Professional.

    When someone asks, "why bother with a BSN or MSN...what good will it do you or what difference will it make?" it clearly screams of vocational mentality. I mean, if I just wanted a "job" then I'd have stayed back in food service or factory work or as a cna and so on.

    You said it clearly and succinctly.

    Obviously not everyone is interested in becoming a professional and do not see it as a benefit, (vocational mentality).
    Gen
    p.s. as a patient I would not want to be someone's mere job...
    I really think you're generalizing to think that all ADNs see nursing as a 'job'. My mom has been a nurse for more than 20 years and doesn't even have a ADN. She has a diploma. This woman is SO passionate about her patients and her work. She can run circles around a lot of nurses-despite their degree.

    How about we focus on why we want to get a higher degree without talking about why others don't want to.

    Personally for me, I wasn't going to bother with a BSN, since I already pursued my MPH. But management doesn't seem to 'get it' with my education and want that BSN no matter what. I still haven't made a final decision yet, but if all they're looking for is a bachelors', I got one of those already.
  7. by   Gennaver
    Quote from zahryia
    I really think you're generalizing to think that all ADNs see nursing as a 'job'. ...
    I agree, that would indeed be a gross generalization and would be a statement that I do not agree with.

    I was referring to people who asked, "why bother?" in regards to advancing their degrees, (not to *all* ADNs).
    Gen
  8. by   loricatus
    Quote from Tweety
    No clinicals the last six months??? That is highly unusual. All the programs around here ADNs and BSNs are doing clinicals/preceptorships up until they walk down the aisle.

    Sorry. Off topic. I just found that interesting. Carry on with the original topic of how a BSN has helped an individual person, or not helped.
    If you want to count a community health clinical as a school nurse where I spent most of the time doing research for my papers (4- 10-20 page for that class) rather than actually attending to the children; and, a geriatric clinical where I interviewed an elder 5 times to write a series of papers (each no less than 25 pages) related to the elder, we can count them as clinical experience (which still was totally useless to my practice as a nurse in the real world). I did here that the school I went to finally started a final semester preceptorship because of the negative feedback given by the local area hospitals concerning the lack of skills they found for the university's graduates.
  9. by   Multicollinearity
    Quote from loricatus
    If you want to count a community health clinical as a school nurse where I spent most of the time doing research for my papers (4- 10-20 page for that class) rather than actually attending to the children; and, a geriatric clinical where I interviewed an elder 5 times to write a series of papers (each no less than 25 pages) related to the elder, we can count them as clinical experience (which still was totally useless to my practice as a nurse in the real world). I did here that the school I went to finally started a final semester preceptorship because of the negative feedback given by the local area hospitals concerning the lack of skills they found for the university's graduates.
    Are you sure those papers were useless? You have the rest of your entire career to "attend to the children." Time in college is a precious time to explore theory and dig deeper, IMHO. I look forward to exploring such areas when I'm in my BSN program. I would think that parsing the issues that affect the elderly and/or children or just patients in general, in the form of writing papers could contribute greatly towards enriching one's knowledge base.
  10. by   nurse4theplanet
    I am an ADN grad. I chose to go this route because it fit my lifestyle (and budget) to allow me to become a nurse and get into the workforce. I do consider myself a professional and view nursing as a profession, not a job. I have always known that I would continue on to BSN. In fact, I see the BSN as merely a stepping stone to my Master's which is my ultimate goal. If there was a RN-MSN program available in something other than Nursing Educator in my area, I would enroll in that program rather than do a separate program for BSN and MSN.

    Having an advanced education opens the doors of opportunity. I don't think anyone is disputing that. It is just very important to remember that there is more than one route to achieve that higher education. Some people do it all at one time, others do it in steps. Either way, the end result is essentially the same. There is no need to debate who is the better beside nurse...and what each individual takes from his/her education and experience is so highly individualized...

    I would recommend to anyone that if you have the time, financial resources, and get accepted into a program...to go for the BSN. However, if you cannot, do not let others discourage or belittle you or your education. Also, don't assume that because someone has a lesser degree that they do not value or do not feel a need to obtain a higher degree. The best nurse is the nurse who never stops learning, never stops furthering his/her education, whether formal or informal.

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