How are you judgemental? - page 5

I was reporting off this morning on a rule out chest pain pt. He was a 49 yr old guy who had an extensive family cardiac risk hx, he had had a CABG in his 30's, had been an alcoholic until 8 yrs ago,... Read More

  1. by   BlueEyedRN
    Quote from stevielynn
    I'm judgmental of spelling errors . . .(judgEmental) . . .
    I'm judgmental of people who are judgmental of spelling errors. Somedays I can't even spell my own name right. I'm always embarrassed when I look back over my charting and realize that my grammar and spelling are mangled. I used to win spelling bees. Or else I make up words. Once I wrote pupiles equal and reactionive. Oh my.
  2. by   dream'n
    At the risk of sounding a little nutty, one of the things that drives me up a wall is gum chewing. I can't stand to see a nurse chomping and popping away while caring for patients. Looks so unprofessional. As for patients, I have problems dealing with the attention-seekers (we all know who they are) and the somehow functioning addicts. Give me a down and out addict anyday, at least there seems some honesty there. Its the professional appearing, manipulative-type addicts that drive me crazy. They lie and manipulate (all the while you know exactly what the score is,) but you can't call them on it, you have to just smile and act like you buy their story; hook, line, and sinker.
  3. by   CritterLover
    Quote from rn mom of 2
    i remember being in the er during nursing school and a guy came in who had overdosed. he was unconscious and in restraints, and these nurses were making fun of him. it still hurts my heart to think about it. they were laughing about the contents of his stomach, which he almost aspirated on (ohhh yeah..that's sooo funny). they were saying he ate a big mac, or something like that. the whole thing made me sick. they thought he was a big looser, because he was an addict. when i looked down i saw a human being who was in pain (emotionally, spiritually) who was coping the best he knew how. the weirdest thing was, he had on an inexpensive ring and i couldn't stop staring at it. it made him so real...so human. it reminded me that we are all the same, and even someone "in the gutter" may want to wear something that makes them feel good about themselves. i'll never forget that guy or the ring he had on.

    i know people joke around, because it's how they cope, but i think it's important to always remain professional, and remember that it is a fellow human being entrusted to our care. you never know when you may be lying on that table, and you'd want the same grace shown to you.


    there can be a difference between laughing at a patient and laughing at the situation.

    this weekend, we had a very drunk man come in with c/o change in mental status. his etoh level was 0.433 (43% alcohol), so he was going to get several liters of fluid. his poor elederly mother (he was in his 50's) stayed in the room with him to hold his arm down so he could get the fluid. otherwise, he kept bending his arm. after a little while, we decided to restart his iv somewhere other than the ac so his mamma didn't have to stand there. (by the way, no one asked her to do this, she did it herself, with the door shut, so we really wern't sure of what was going on until we went in to check on him. he had a seizure when he first arrived, so he had gotten some ativan, so he should have been out cold -- and he was, other than bending that arm). so three of us go in there, two to hold and one to stick. we get the iv restarted, and notice that he was just soaked. too soaked to just change the bed. so we decided it would be best for him just to change out the stretcher.

    well, lets just say that he was heavier than he looked. we managed to get him into a dry gown, but getting him from the wet stretcher to the dry stretcher, without getting the new stretcher wet.......well it was quite a bit tougher than it looked. add to that, he started peeing again all over the place, in great volumes. at one point, the three of us were giggling like little girls.

    from all appearances, we were laughing at our very drunk, completly soaked, patient. but we wern't. we were laughing at the situation, and our ineptness at doing a seemingly simple task.
  4. by   SoulShine75
    Quote from angelladyclaire
    I think drug seeking behavior is the thing I am quickest to judge on. I'm not judgmental directly to the patient, mind you, but I have a running commentary in my mind that is probably not very polite. I know we are supposed to take the patient's pain rating as the gospel truth, but I have charted pain ratings using 2 different scales before. "Pt. rates her pain at a 10 on the numeric scale. Pain rating is a 2 per the FLACC scale..." etc.
    I understand what you are saying, but at the same time that person may very well be in pain too. I was in the hospital several months ago with kidney stones and the pain was horrible. I was given demarol PO q 4hr prn and believe me those pills wore off in 3.5 and I was asking my nurse for my med because it hurt!!! I didn't think she minded because aside from my asking for my medicine I tried not to be a nagging patient. Well, on one of my rotations this semester I numerously heard some of the nurses call patients drug seekers because they wanted their pain med when it was due. It made me wonder if the nurses thought the same of me or if they secretly thought this of all pt's who request their medicine. I was really appalled by this because these people could very well be in pain like I was. I'm not saying that all nurses are this way, I worked with some wonderful women who treated their patients with so much respect and never judged. We aren't perfect, but I have learned a lesson....I will never judge someone's pain. It isn't my pain to judge.
  5. by   SillyLilly
    Quote from RN mom of 2
    This is a good topic, because I think as nurses we aren't supposed to judge our patients, but human nature makes us judgmental in some ways.

    I am bothered by pg women who are smoking, drinking etc., because they are responsible for another life. I kind of put these women in a different category than the average person who may be abusing themselves, but no one else.

    Other than that, I try not to judge people. Let's face it...life can be difficult, and most of us find ways (not always healthy ones) to cope. Some people really lose their way, for example drug addicts, alcoholics, and those with serious eating disorders (to name a few). Also, report is for relaying the medical facts and not for passing our own personal judgments along. When you state your own personal feelings to the next nurse, it sets up her psyche to feel the same way about that patient.

    I remember being in the ER during nursing school and a guy came in who had overdosed. He was unconscious and in restraints, and these nurses were making fun of him. It still hurts my heart to think about it. They were laughing about the contents of his stomach, which he almost aspirated on (ohhh yeah..that's sooo funny). They were saying he ate a big mac, or something like that. The whole thing made me sick. They thought he was a big looser, because he was an addict. When I looked down I saw a human being who was in pain (emotionally, spiritually) who was coping the best he knew how. The weirdest thing was, he had on an inexpensive ring and I couldn't stop staring at it. It made him so real...so human. It reminded me that we are all the same, and even someone "in the gutter" may want to wear something that makes them feel good about themselves. I'll never forget that guy or the ring he had on.

    I know people joke around, because it's how they cope, but I think it's important to always remain professional, and remember that it is a fellow human being entrusted to our care. You never know when you may be lying on that table, and you'd want the same grace shown to you.


    I agreee! Many pts and pts family and co workers exhibit behavior that make me cringe. I have many similar stories to the ones mentioned in this post.

    But I do not ACCEPT NURSES MAKING FUN OF PTS or FAMILY. That is outrageous. I see a human being in the bed-- not work, not a problem, not something funny, or ugly or whatever. Make sme want to cry! God forbid one of them has a terrible stroke or something and they are in the hospital, and they are getting laughed at. Some people just cannot look at situations from someone elses point of view.


    I do want to say I love the honesty (and the humor) of this post. Its great to vent, but it makes you take a look at yourself and your actions. I really wish more nurses visited this site-especially the ones I work with.
  6. by   RN BSN 2009
    vent vent vent away!
  7. by   GardenDove
    I can't believe they had to drop the e in judgmental! English spelling rules are absolutely exasperating. Did anyone see the movie Spellbound? People who can spell that well are total freaks of nature!

    It just doesn't make a bit of sense to drop that E. [evil]I protest[/evil]
  8. by   augigi
    Haha.. that's my other one, people who can't spell. I just don't understand it, since an incorrect words just LOOKS incorrect to me. But I realise it's just not important to some people.
  9. by   TrudyRN
    Quote from agoodusername
    I really don't appreciate this thread. Aren't we perpetuating stereotypes by highlighting them in a discussion? This is exactly how "drug seekers" and "complainers" are created, marked, studied and pegged -- before we ever even experience them!

    I'm in nursing school, and I remember the first time I heard a nurse give me report on my very first patient. "She's got these open abcesses on her thighs that are really painful, she says. But if she's in so much pain, why is she still going downstairs to smoke every hour?" This made sense to me, a naiive, inexperienced nursing student, and so, before I even got a chance to begin my career in my own way of thought, I walked into my patient's room with a stereotype blocking my entire field of view. Because of this, the first thing I noticed about her was that she was sleeping with her cigarettes in her breast pocket (of course), and the first thing I assumed was that she would be crabby and want to smoke as soon as she woke up (of course), and that she really wasn't in all that much pain (of course not).

    I'm really thankful that I took the time to try and get to know her, because I learned a lot about how wrong that nurse was. I learned that my patient was missing her son's first day of kindergarten, and that she had been diagnosed with Crohn's a decade ago with no end in sight. She really was in pain, which I could clearly see without years of experience under my belt, and yes, she smoked. But it made me realize: why wouldn't she? She had nothing else to get her through the day!

    Stereotyping is really a huge issue with nurses, especially in the realm of report. You can make or break a nurse's DAY depending on how you describe your patient at end of shift. Think about it -- the outlook for your day can be completely different depending on the report you get: "This patient is really great. She's sweet, she doesn't really complain, and she definitely knows how to get up and go to the bathroom by herself. Really easy," versus, "Oh my gosh. What a nervous nancy. This lady shakes, and she's a smoker, but she's not allowed off the monitor so she just bugs you all the time about going downstairs. She always asks for pain medicine, but when you walk in she's asleep, and she has been incontinent three times. It's not going to be a good night for you." Everyone knows how each of these reports gives you a totally different outlook for your shift, and how you treat your patient.

    This is my argument: both examples are wrong. Both examples of report put an idea into the receiving nurses mind, and immediately create a stereotype that molds and alters the rest of the shift and every dealing with the patient. I think that report should STRICTLY be confined to report -- medical, objective information that is PERTINENT and important to nursing care, NOT nurse opinion.

    Stereotyping is a HUGE problem in nursing. Let's STOP glorifying it by giving petty examples of people who bother us. Our patients are sick, and regardless of what they are sick with or how sick they are, they deserve respect, and good, unbiased, un-stereotyped care.
    Just keep doing your own thing. Some people are just bitter, jealous, unhappy people. Or maybe they're just human and are irked by this or that. What bothers me is two-facedness.
  10. by   Multicollinearity
    never mind
    Last edit by Multicollinearity on Dec 12, '06
  11. by   TrudyRN
    Quote from Wish I was at Disney
    At the risk of sounding a little nutty, one of the things that drives me up a wall is gum chewing. I can't stand to see a nurse chomping and popping away while caring for patients. Looks so unprofessional. As for patients, I have problems dealing with the attention-seekers (we all know who they are) and the somehow functioning addicts. Give me a down and out addict anyday, at least there seems some honesty there. Its the professional appearing, manipulative-type addicts that drive me crazy. They lie and manipulate (all the while you know exactly what the score is,) but you can't call them on it, you have to just smile and act like you buy their story; hook, line, and sinker.
    Why can't you be for real with them?
  12. by   RN mom of 2
    Quote from GardenDove
    I can't believe they had to drop the e in judgmental! English spelling rules are absolutely exasperating. Did anyone see the movie Spellbound? People who can spell that well are total freaks of nature!

    It just doesn't make a bit of sense to drop that E. [evil]I protest[/evil]
    Oh...I guess I did spell judgmental correctly! See, all this spelling talk has me sooo confused. It doesn't take much to get me confused!!

    Where's that fish......?? I'm going to hit myself with it....:trout:

    hee hee
  13. by   RazorbackRN
    Quote from augigi
    haha.. that's my other one, people who can't spell. i just don't understand it, since an incorrect words just looks incorrect to me. but i realise it's just not important to some people.

    well, here in the good ole usa, we spell that word realize.:smilecoffeecup:

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