How to answer the 10 year goal question??

  1. 0
    I'm getting ready to have my first nursing interview & I am preparing for any questions I may be asked....I am prepared to discuss what my 5 year goal is, but am stumped on a 10 year goal! Do they want to know about my personal life (married/kids) or strictly professional? Help! I don't want to say charge nurse/nurse manager because it will look like I'm shooting to take their job right?
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  4. 4
    I would give the most honest answer you can give:

    Nursing has shown a fast paced pattern of evolution. 10 years ago, we did not have computer charting, linked charts, or radiographs online. We couldn't text page our docs for alerts. We didn't carry hospital provided cell phones on our person as the main way to communicate with our patients. We didn't have scanners for med passes. We didn't have mobile computers. These changes just began to become widely used within the past 7 years.

    If you chose nursing BECAUSE of the many avenues our profession offers, state such and simply say that you are looking forward to embracing and implementing the many changes that will no doubt be present in 10 years. There is nothing wrong with stating that you would like to pursue a certification in your field, or that in 10 years, you would like to become involved with hospital wide committees to improve the practice of nursing on a larger scale in your facility.

    This answer shows that you understand that nursing is a constantly evolving and developing profession. It also doesn't pigeonhole you into a specific job; but rather represents your "big picture" mentality. You want to convey to the person interviewing you that you are serious about nursing as a career and furthermore want to contribute to the facility itself.

    Just my two cents. Hope the interview goes well!
    UVAnurse9, waterlily777, tokmom, and 1 other like this.
  5. 2
    Your first nursing interview?

    Your "personal" 10-year goals - fine! Marriage, kids, mortgage-free house, be respected as a fiddle-player, win the local fly-fishing trophy and have my poems published. Great - you have a life outside of nursing and you will bring lots of personal reality to your job.

    If I were interviewing a new nurse and she/he gave a super-ambitious "professional" reply to the "10 -year question", I would think: "yeah, yeah, yeah, right......page 6 in the pamphlet "How to succeed at an Interview".....another one who just isn't real".

    As canesdukegirl said, there are huge changes in our profession. Also, there will be huge changes in you after working in our profession for a few years. Your priorities will change, your sympathies will change, your politics will change, your interests will change, you will change - in ways you cannot yet imagine.

    In the years ahead of you, you may decide on a specific, narrow clinical specialisation that grips your interest, or management, or education, or union militancy, or missionary work, or patient advocacy, or hairdressing.

    Seriously, whoever thought of the "10-year question" hasn't a clue about nursing.
    IdrilRN and Telelizard like this.
  6. 1
    Do NOT tell them you want to be a union militant.
    JB2007 likes this.
  7. 0
    Don't include family matters; it's strictly a question to see where you want to be professionally speaking. Are you looking to advance at the place you're applying to? Are you going to be satisfied staying in the position you are applying for long term etc... or are there other slots at the place you might be interested in later on etc... Basically they want to see if you'll be there long or are your goals such that there facility cannot accommodate.

    Another thing; how do you know there's going to be a 10 year question? That sounds well ... as others have said. Seriously, how do you know that is one of the questions?
  8. 0
    Quote from tyvin
    Another thing; how do you know there's going to be a 10 year question? That sounds well ... as others have said. Seriously, how do you know that is one of the questions?
    Page 6 of the "How to Succeed in an Interview" pamphlet says so...
  9. 3
    Quote from dudette10
    Page 6 of the "How to Succeed in an Interview" pamphlet says so...
    Well, it could be page 7 or 8.....I haven't written it yet. Wait till it's published, along with my poetry and fly-fishing tips. See my website: howtobeaunionmissionarywithhighlightsandaperm.com
    chicookie, tyvin, and dudette10 like this.
  10. 2
    Y'all are too funny. Hey Mickey, can you give me some tips on catching that big game fish next time I deploy my downriggers?!?!

    I think that the OP is just preparing herself for any questions that may be asked during her interview. Although I have never heard of the 10 year question (outside of my pre-marital counselor), I suppose anything is possible.

    OP, as long as you address the changes that nursing entails and don't place yourself in a specific job (i.e., "I want to be the next Nurse Manager for this unit!"), you should be fine. Remember that employers are looking for candidates that express interest in the facility as well as the improvement of nursing practice as a whole.
    MickeyTong and tyvin like this.
  11. 0
    Thanks SO much for the awesome feedback! Its great! I'm not positive they will be asking this question, but have read a few blogs that state these are the type of questions being asked in interviews these days. Its better to be prepared than try to stumble through any answer and blow my chances. This is my first interview and it would amazing if I got the position!!!!! Thx again!!
  12. 0
    Quote from canesdukegirl
    Y'all are too funny. Hey Mickey, can you give me some tips on catching that big game fish next time I deploy my downriggers?!?!

    I think that the OP is just preparing herself for any questions that may be asked during her interview. Although I have never heard of the 10 year question (outside of my pre-marital counselor), I suppose anything is possible.

    OP, as long as you address the changes that nursing entails and don't place yourself in a specific job (i.e., "I want to be the next Nurse Manager for this unit!"), you should be fine. Remember that employers are looking for candidates that express interest in the facility as well as the improvement of nursing practice as a whole.
    Firstly, canesdukegirl, I live on a Scottish island which has several "huntin' and fishin' estates". We don't have "big game fish", although whale sharks frequently saunter by offshore, sucking up their SpongeBobs. I can't be specific about your local situation, but my best tip for you is to listen to your "ghillie" (gamekeeper? warden? whatevertheUSterm), who will have intimate knowledge of local conditions and makes his own flies in sober moments when his hands don't shake too much. Anyway, see my website: $1000adayfora1lbtrout.com for more details.

    But back to our OP, Lizard......

    Understandably - nervous and excited, hot to trot and keen for the game. I am aware of the American tendency towards hyperbolic self-promotion, and the British penchant for restrained self-denigration. So, what I recommend may not be entirely suitable for the American context. But....

    Tell them you're interested in the clinical work they do, and you want to develop your skills in that area, because (xyz) you've heard this unit has an excellent reputation, you did a clinical placement in this field and it really gripped you, this is a neglected area of healthcare which needs more input, you are thinking of specialising in this area.....

    Good luck, Lizard


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