Hovering (a tiny vent)

  1. 0 My instructor stresses to us (CNA students) the importance of being assertive and confident when dealing with residents, co-workers, and family members. Last night during clinical, I was paired with a young lady who was very passive and she hovered. I cannot deal with hovering. She was clinging on to me for dear life.

    Now, I am not one to complain about a problem and not be part of the solution. I tried to coach her and help her start a rapport with the residents and the staff at the facility. Unfortunately, that yielded no positive result. To make matters worse, she was a bump on a log until our instructor came into a room to observe. :smackingf

    I know an important part of nursing is being a team player but it was just frustrating.

    That is all.
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  3. Visit  Suburban.Raider.11} profile page

    About Suburban.Raider.11

    From 'Georgia'; Joined Jul '10; Posts: 55; Likes: 48.

    17 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  NurseLoveJoy88} profile page
    2
    Go ahead and vent away.
    Anica78 and Crux1024 like this.
  5. Visit  Suburban.Raider.11} profile page
    1
    Thanks!
    Anica78 likes this.
  6. Visit  Whispera} profile page
    2
    I agree, vent away!

    In such situations, it's difficult to confront the elephant in the room, isn't it? Maybe that's what needs to happen though. If she's hovering and it bothers you, tell her. If she's being a bump and it bothers you, tell her. Neither behavior will help her become a better caregiver. You could be doing her a great favor by letting her know you notice how she's behaving and it's not appropriate. Sometimes the leaders have to do that for the followers.
    Crux1024 and Suburban.Raider.11 like this.
  7. Visit  Suburban.Raider.11} profile page
    0
    Quote from Whispera
    I agree, vent away!

    In such situations, it's difficult to confront the elephant in the room, isn't it? Maybe that's what needs to happen though. If she's hovering and it bothers you, tell her. If she's being a bump and it bothers you, tell her. Neither behavior will help her become a better caregiver. You could be doing her a great favor by letting her know you notice how she's behaving and it's not appropriate. Sometimes the leaders have to do that for the followers.

    I tried and tried again. I made suggestions and offered to help but every single time we entered a residents room, she would freeze up and would not leave my side.

    I really want her to find her comfort zone but it's wearing me out!
  8. Visit  Whispera} profile page
    1
    What I meant was that you might need to just point-blank tell her how she comes across...away from other people of course. Helpful suggestions aren't helping so more directness might be necessary. "Matilda, you're hovering and in my personal space. When you do that I feel ____." "Matilda, you're just sitting there. Do _____ or you'll never learn anything!" "Matilda, I'm not going to cover for you in this. You have to do your share."

    If you already did this, never mind.

    I do wish you luck and lots of assertiveness. Know that you are learning while she isn't. That could be the treasure in all of this. You're also getting experience with teaching and delegating to a difficult peer....
    canoehead likes this.
  9. Visit  EricJRN} profile page
    0
    Where I work (in NICU), I often find that our babies' family members tend to hover. I love teaching and I'm all for explaining what I'm doing and answering questions, but sometimes people really do invade my personal space.

    What I try to do is to give them a simple task that involves them positioning themselves on the other side of the patient. "I'm going to put the blood pressure cuff on this arm. If you don't mind, I'm going to have you stand on that side so that you can take the temperature in just a second." Or something like that.

    Good luck to you! It sounds like an exhausting problem if it goes on for an entire shift. Will you be paired with this student a lot?
  10. Visit  Suburban.Raider.11} profile page
    0
    You're right. I haven't flat out told her that she's in my space and it makes me uncomfortable. I'm sure it will come up again tomorrow night. I will be direct and see if that helps. Thanks for the advice. I'll keep you posted.
  11. Visit  Suburban.Raider.11} profile page
    0
    @EricJRN

    It kind of depends on how the chips fall. We are a small group, so we pair up frequently.
  12. Visit  JSlovex2} profile page
    0
    is it possible to takes turns entering rooms? that would solve the problem pretty quickly. you could even talk to your instructor about it being a little awkward (without throwing said person under the bus) when both of you walk in, and you were wondering if you could take turns at least a few times just to get comfortable going in alone. that may not be an option.

    let's assume it's not. some people have dominant personalities. use that and say, "hey, when we go into this resident's room, i'm going to let you talk. i'll walk in behind you and you can introduce us. i'll let you lead." that may be what your partner WANTS. if she declines and gives a "no, you do it" then talk to your instructor if you think that's necessary. if it were me, i'd probably just be thankful that i was getting the experience/practice and realize it's going to be her loss in the end.
  13. Visit  Little Miss Coffee} profile page
    1
    I definitely agree that you need to be direct.

    I took CNA clinicals twice (once was a couple years ago, the most recent one was to refresh those skills).

    The first time...I was that girl.

    I do have compassion for her because I know how awkward it is to approach strangers assertively, especially when that means pulling their drawers down or something. She may already know what she's doing, at least to a degree, and feel bad about it. I know I did; it made me feel like crap.

    But never did anyone really kick my butt. They "hinted" a few times, but that was it. I finished the clinical feeling guilty and mediocre.

    The second time, I still felt very shy and nervous, but took so much more initiative - this time, it was for real, and I had to be strong enough to overcome that shyness and insecurity. It worked. A few embarrassing moments, sure, but I came out with more confidence.

    She may not feel that way - she REALLY might not feel that way before the end of the class. It's imperative that someone tells her in blunt terms what the problem is. Not only is it going to be best for you and your classmates and the residents, it will be better for her! This is a learning experience, so she should learn from it!

    If you are able to explain to her the reason why you're confronting her this way - because she's not learning what she just paid money to learn - this should sufficiently soften the blow. You ARE looking out for her, even if you are also looking out for yourself.
    Chin up likes this.
  14. Visit  kool-aide, RN} profile page
    0
    Just try to be more patient... She seems to look up to you as an example.

    I'm sure it's super annoying....it would drive me up the wall. Just give her time and I'm sure it will work out on it's own!
  15. Visit  locolorenzo22} profile page
    1
    Don't run right to the instructor...unless she is doing something that is going to seriously compromise pt safety. Take her aside the next time you are paired with her and say "Look, I feel like you're holding back. Are you nervous? scared? worried you won't know what to say? etc." Let her speak...then address it with "I'm going to help you, but you've got to try. Introduce us when we go in, make small talk with the patient, let them know what we're going to do, and we'll get things done together. I'll talk too. It's a conversation."
    Personally, some days its tough to even have that converstation with some patients. Even when they don't want to talk, you have to find a way to get across what you have to do and move on.
    It sounds to me like you have a good handle on the personal part of nursing. Be an example and keep it up. Post back and let us know how this works out!
    Whispera likes this.


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