Hourly wage with "normal" hours (South) - page 3

by oldeddieboy

I'm not sure if it's right to ask how much people make, but I'm trying to get an idea of how much nurses usually make in the south. Most figures include data from states where pay is much higher. Specifically, I'm looking... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from wooh
    Only if there's a strip club called, "in a hospital down south." Last I heard only RNs down south making that money on dayshifts are working at the Cheetah.
    Hilarious!!!... And agreed.
  2. 0
    Quote from hiddencatRN
    Is it possible anywhere without overtime? I calculate that to being about $53+ an hour for 36 hour weeks. I worked in a high COL area and wages weren't close to that even with experience.
    *** Absolutly possible. I make well over 100K not counting OT, though I do work 40 hours a week, not 36. Many other people doing it, though from what I have read here not in the south.
  3. 1
    I see several people mention the cost of living as an explanation why wages are what they are. I don't really get that. Of course on a personal level one would be well advised to consider cost of living in equal measure with pay when considering a job or location. However a hospital in Alabama is reimbursed for a particular procedure the same amount of money a hospital in California is. Why should there be a pay difference? My other question is if hospitals in California and Alabama are both paid X for (let's say a CABG), the hospital in Alabama pays it's nurses $20/hour and hospital in California pays it's nurses $40/hour. What happend to that VAST amount of money the Alabama hospital recives that it doesn't have to pay out to it's nurses like the California hospital does? My guess is that nurses working in Alabama are hearing the same thing from their hospital about the need to cut costs the nurses in California are hearing. Seems to me that the Alabama hospital should be absolutly rolling in cash.
    I would not, and do not accept, an area's cost of living as an excuse to underpay RNs. When I was looking for a place to relocate to one of the things I noticed was the states with strong nurses unions paid far more than states without unions. I live in Wisconsin and we do not have a nurses union here with one exeption. The university hospital in Madison is unionized. Nurses wages in Madison are MUCH higher than nurses wages in the rest of the state. Down in Madison new grads would start at $30+/hour base. Grad nurses up here in the northern part are lucky to start at $20/hour.
    I think the lower COL is only an excuse. The real driver of nurses wages is supply and demand and unions have the power to limit the supply (through strikes).
    wooh likes this.
  4. 0
    I think unions have a lot more to do with our crappy pay than COL. But it is what it is...
  5. 0
    RN start around 20/hr in SC. A couple systems top out at about 65k per year.

    Same here for NP's and PA's too... they are salaried starting around 60k something/year so they can run all the poor souls into the ground with as many hours as they can get out of them. There needs to be some protection for the mid levels hours.
  6. 0
    Medicare has a formula to adjust payment in relation to local wages. A university hospital also gets more funds for being. a teaching hospital . So it is unfair to say that all hospitals get paid the same.
  7. 0
    Quote from Ginger's Mom
    Medicare has a formula to adjust payment in relation to local wages. A university hospital also gets more funds for being. a teaching hospital . So it is unfair to say that all hospitals get paid the same.
    *** Ok thank you for correcting me. I was told by our VP of patient care services that all hospitals in our state recieved the same amount of money for the same services. I thought it would be the same in the country. And who knows if she knew what she was talking about.
    So if nurses wages are increased the hospital will be paid more. Is that right? I assume there would be a lag between the increase in wages for an area and the increased payment to the hospital but it wouldn't put as much burden on the hospital as I was lead to believe.
  8. 0
    I don't want to imagine how much I would have to work to make that here in SC.
  9. 0
    Quote from wooh
    Only if there's a strip club called, "in a hospital down south." Last I heard only RNs down south making that money on dayshifts are working at the Cheetah.


    Judging by the comments, it seems like $60-70k ($32-$38/hr) is more realistic for the highest paid nurses with lots of experience and normal working hours. Not really wealthy, but still pretty good. Teachers top out at around $46k with a bachelor degree and 30 yrs experience. Not sure which is job is harder.
  10. 2
    Quote from oldeddieboy


    Judging by the comments, it seems like $60-70k ($32-$38/hr) is more realistic for the highest paid nurses with lots of experience and normal working hours. Not really wealthy, but still pretty good. Teachers top out at around $46k with a bachelor degree and 30 yrs experience. Not sure which is job is harder.
    But don't forget ... many teachers are state employers, with better benefits and pension plans than most nurses. My sister and I make a good comparison as we are only 1.5 years apart in age. I am a nurse with a PhD in nursing, working for a hospital. She only has a Master's Degree and taught 2nd grade in a small town public school.

    Her school district paid for her Master's Degree while I paid for most of my graduate education scrounging around for grants, student loans, and using up most of my savings. She was shocked 2 or 3 years ago when they asked the teachers to pay a $10 co-pay when seeing a doctor. She had never had a co-pay before. She was able to retire while still in her early 50's (after 30 total years of employment) with a state pension guaranteeing her 60% of her final salary for life -- adjusted annually for inflation. She also will get Social Security (though it will be reduced because of the state pension). If she lives past 82, she will collect the pension for longer than she actually worked, giving her over 1.6 years of salary for every year she worked. She is also still able to get her health insurance through the school district at the group rate even though she is retired.

    So ... while I always brought home more cash in my paycheck as a nurse ... her great benefits and life-long guaranteed state pension will make her the "winner" when you calculate it out as compensation for the number of hours actually worked -- assuming she doesn't die young. She is in her late 50's now, playing golf 4 days a week and going to out to lunch a lot. She and husband (also a retired teacher/school administrator) spend 3 months each winter in Florida in a gaited golf community. They'll be leaving for a Carribean cruise in 2 weeks. etc. etc. etc. I plan to work until my mid-60's because I won't have a pension or any source of good health insurance until Medicare kicks unless I get it through an employer.

    Not every public school teach had as good a contract as my sister ... but don't let their "low salaries" fool you. A lot of teachers are doing better than they let on --once you figure in those benefits and pensions. And oh, let's not forget ... she never had to work during the summer. That's how she got so good at golf. She used her summers to take 1 or 2 classes at a time for her Master's (100% paid for by the school district.)
    Last edit by llg on Oct 10, '12
    wooh and PMFB-RN like this.


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