Hospital Nurses - page 7

Yesterday at clinicals I asked our instructor, at the end of the day's group meeting, what a nursing student should do if the nurses atthe rehab center I was at won't talk to you, when you attempt to... Read More

  1. by   baseline
    HOW TO STAY YOUNG

    1. Throw out nonessential numbers. This includes age,
    weight and height. Let the doctor worry about them.
    That is why you pay him.

    2. Keep only cheerful friends. The grouches pull you down.

    3. Keep learning. Learn more about the computer, crafts,
    gardening, whatever. Never let the brain idle. "An idle mind
    is the devil's workshop." And the devil's name is Alzheimer's.

    4. Enjoy the simple things.

    5. Laugh often, long and loud. Laugh until you gasp for breath.

    6. The tears happen. Endure, grieve, and move on. The only
    person who is with us our entire life, is ourselves. Be ALIVE
    while you are alive.

    7. Surround yourself with what you love, whether it's family,
    pets, keepsakes, music, plants, hobbies, whatever. Your home
    is your refuge.

    8. Cherish your health: If it is good, preserve it. If it is unstable,
    improve it. If it is beyond what you can improve, get help.

    9. Don't take guilt trips. Take a trip to the mall, to the next
    county, to a foreign country, but NOT to where the guilt is.

    10. Tell the people you love that you love them, at every
    opportunity.

    AND ALWAYS REMEMBER:

    Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but
    by the moments that take our breath away.

    HAPPY HOLIDAYS EVERYONE!
  2. by   KRVRN
    It's hard to be a student. I had one instructor that would flat out tell us to go ask the staff nurse assigned to the pt if we needed help because "he/she knows the pt better than I do." Oh, she MIGHT come help you if she wasn't too busy scrutinizing your (and everyone else's) charting in a back office somewhere, but you could never count on it. Then after the staff sigh and ask where our instructor was, then MIGHT or might not help us depending how busy they were.

    It's especially hard to be caught in the middle of "go ask someone else" when your pt seems to be having an immediate drug reaction and no one will come help you.
  3. by   ktwlpn
    Originally posted by Flo1216
    Shoot, now we can't even post where we want? Sure, Mario and I could post on the student nurses forum but then we wouldn't get the feedback from the nurses with whom we are in conflict. Just because I have never worked a shift as a regular nurse does not mean I am not entitled to an opinion.And to generalize student nurses as being egotistical is unfair. I think most of us are scared to death. I don't feel that one has to be a licensed nurse to know that it is wrong to treat people who want to learn and eventually join their profession like ****. And not for nothing, I have worked with nurses with heavy pt loads who were under stress who treated me with nothing but respect. So it IS possible to be stressed out and not bite someone's head off when for example, the student reminds them that they are not allowed to give meds through a port or PICC line.(even though they are informed of this by the INSTRUCTOR beforehand. One time I didn't remind them and the med wasn't given and I got yelled at because, " You should have told me," even though they were already told)I have a class who is very respectful. We don't throw are notebooks all over or sit at the nurses station talking about our weekend. We are there to learn. It isn't as though each student has their own personal instructor, so if we have to "bother" you from time to time, so be it.
    Yes-you and Mario are completely above reproach. Cry out that you are being treated "like sh*t" for no reason in clinical or you are being mobbed here because someone is saying something that you don't want to hear....I don't feel that I have to qualify every single statement that I make here or dilute my message to be p.c. Bottom line-you refuse to see that when you have a problem YOU MAY be a contributing factor....If you don't want to hear the other side of this topic then you should post it in the student nursing forum.....by posting it here you full well know that you are getting feedback from real working nurses.....If you want to commiserate you'll find that other students will tell you what you want to hear ....
  4. by   Dr. Kate
    Reading through this thread and catching up from late last week got me thinking. I can remember many of the patients and some of their names from my student experience (almost 30 years ago) but I cannot remember even one nurse's name, only one comes vaguely to mind if I think very hard and that was because of the way she answered the phone. I have no recall of any significant interaction with any working nurse while on clinicals. I o not think this is a good thing; I don't think I thought it was a good thing at the time, but didn't know any better. By the time I was licensed I had decided that students were important and needed any experience they could get. I set out to help the students and new nurses who came my way, and did get a reputation for being a good one to work with.

    If the culture of nursing is ever going to change, it has to start with how we treat your young, both when they are students and as new grads. It is possible to stop the transmission of bad behavior. It's a matter of choice. Sometimes you have to make that choice daily, sometimes hourly, and some days from minute to minute. One of my nursing insturctors (Psych) told of something she did with her children, she would tell them when she was having a bad day, and ask they apreciate that as much as they could. I don't know how well it works with children, I don't have any, but I do know it sure can help if you let people know up front what limits of patience and understanding you may have on a particular day. No one likes surprises. For myself, I have found telling someone I was a bit stressed or having a bad day, not only made the day easier for both of us, but also went a long way to improving the day.

    At base I think the truth is that we are all responsible for our own education. If you're not getting what you think you should be getting, it's up to you to find a way to get it.
  5. by   Flo1216
    KTWLPN- Wow...I didn't realize that you were actually present during my clinical rotation and witnessed how I and my classmates are sometimes treated. I never told you to qualify anything. And I never said I was " above reproach"(although you seem to believe that YOU are) NOR did I say I did not want to hear the other side of this topic. Nor did I say anyone's message had to be diluted in order to be PC. Please do not put words into my mouth. As for me refusing to believe I have a problem...I don't believe that I do. When I do something wrong or out of line, I will admit it. When my instructor introduces me to a nurse and the nurse right in front of me rolls her eyes and whines, " I have a student today" when I haven't even SAID anything, I think that perhaps someone else has the problem.
  6. by   Teshiee
    let's face it for most of us nursing school was pure hell. and just surviving was your mission. unfortunately instead of terrorizing the students it should be in a learning environment. when i came across witchy nurses i would read the chart and look up the information, screw them noone can keep you from learning but you. like i said in my previous thread it doesn't last forever just picture your graduation and taking your boards and getting your license in the mail. then you will realize you had it in you all that time. it would be a perfect world if people were receptive to everyone but they are not i would think something would be wierd if every nurse was cheery all the time. respect is no excuse , though you deserve that. sometimes we nurses forget where we started and should be reminded that it was hard for us too. i wish you the best mario please keep us posted on your success.
  7. by   ktwlpn
    Originally posted by Flo1216
    KTWLPN- Wow...I didn't realize that you were actually present during my clinical rotation and witnessed how I and my classmates are sometimes treated. I never told you to qualify anything. And I never said I was " above reproach"(although you seem to believe that YOU are) NOR did I say I did not want to hear the other side of this topic. Nor did I say anyone's message had to be diluted in order to be PC. Please do not put words into my mouth. As for me refusing to believe I have a problem...I don't believe that I do. When I do something wrong or out of line, I will admit it. When my instructor introduces me to a nurse and the nurse right in front of me rolls her eyes and whines, " I have a student today" when I haven't even SAID anything, I think that perhaps someone else has the problem.
    I try every day to be endlessly patient with co-workers,students,patients and their families.I know that when I am having a bad day I really have to work hard at it-and I strive to do so....No-I am not above reproach and I feely admit that there have been highly stressful times in my career that my professional mask has slipped....Can you LEARN from other's experiences? I have read your posts enough to know that as a student and an aide you have been involved in some challenging situations-do you learn from your own experiences or are you blind to your own faults? As someone else has stated perhaps your extreme defensiveness here is a sign that you DO see your self in some of these posts and are uncomfortable with that.When a staff nurse rolls her eyes in your face did you let it go and finish the day with a major chip on your shoulder or did you say " I will try to stay out of your way but I will be responsible for the following,etc" When dealing with stupidity day after day after day it is difficult to remain professional-perhaps these nurses have had bad experiences with students and inattentive instructors in the past-don't forget that the nurses are dealing with life and death issues every hour...Your clinical experience is not their responsibility
  8. by   Youda
    I haven't had the bad experiences with students that you all are talking about. Yes, I've seen them swarming over the charts, med carts, etc. I just say, "Hey, gang, I gotta get in there," and they all part like the Red Sea. Most students I've encountered are so timid and insecure that if you come up behind them and say, "Boo" they'll have major heart failures. I'm always glad to see them because they take some of my workload. When they have come to me, it's because there is something going on with a patient, who I am ultimately responsible for, that I need to know about. When they've asked me a question, for the most part, it's in a hesitant unsure-of-themselves manner. I can hardly resent them for that! I try to find one if I'm about to do a procedure (start IVs or insert caths, suction, gross dressing change, whatever). I remember when I was a student a doctor came to me, knowing I was a student, and asked me if I'd like to come with him while he did a procedure. He explained what he was doing and why, every anatomical part, every rationale. I've never forgotten that doctor or the procedure (that is one doctor who IS God, in my book, for taking the time to include me). Kindness takes so little time. Yeah, there are times we get stressed. When I've snapped at someone during those times, I hunt them up later to apologize. Kindness takes so little time.
  9. by   Flo1216
    Thanks, Youda...I needed to hear that. Actually, KTWLPN...I did not walk around the whole day with a chip on my shoulder. As a matter of fact, I stood back timidly not wanting to be in the way. I was there merely for an observational experience (that had been scheduled for months) and was subsequently ignored. Do I learn from my mistakes? Of course I do. And I take responsibilty for my actions, when it is INDEED my actions that cause the problem. I am not, however going to apologize for simply existing. I understand that nurses deal with life and death issues everyday...it is not as though I am going up to one of them during a code and asking them a question about an antibiotic. It's more like, the nurse who is in charge of my patient is sitting down doing some charting and my pt has a 30 blood sugar and needs D50 which I cannot give since students are not allowed to give anything IV push. Or maybe I need to inform the nurse that my pts BP just dropped to 70/40 and students are not allowed to titrate dopamine. Little things like that.Or maybe the family has questions for the nurse that I cannot answer. And not for nothing, since I would be hell bent to find a time when the nurse ISN'T very busy, when am I supposed to converse with her? Never, I suppose. I understand that my clinical experience is not the responsibilty of the nurse, but the patient I am assigned to may be. Don't get me wrong, I have had very positive clinical experiences and have learned a lot as a CNA, but the negative experiences I have had are very real, unfortunately. And to simply assume that any maltreatment I have recieved is MY fault because I am a student and inexperienced is unfair. The fact of the matter is that regardless of one's current stress level or amount of experience or reason for being on the unit, everyone deserves to be treated with respect.
  10. by   P_RN
    Refrain from personal attacks please.
    Stay on the subject please.
  11. by   fab4fan
    Whoops...sorry, that wasn't meant to end up here.
  12. by   Pretzlgl
    Originally posted by Dr. Kate
    If you're not getting what you think you should be getting, it's up to you to find a way to get it.
    Exactly
  13. by   mario_ragucci
    I compliment everyone whose participated in this thread because nursing birth is so complicated and diverse, as is nursing, which is why I do and will love it more and more....variety. Students rotate from sniff, to elder care, to acute care, to psych....and there will be all kinds of nurses I'll be blessed to meet over the next 1.6 years.
    By YOUR infinate wisdom and grace, i will go to all my future clinical sights with better sensitivity and infinate patience. If others try to disrespect me, I'll take it more in stride. Rest assured i AM part of the change in nursing, and I WILL treat all new comers afore me with care and love. Mario's loving examples will be contagious. And if you like to look frazzled and all burnt up, thats cool too :-)

    Heh - I practiced all day in nursing school LAB for 4 hours practicing to pass my injection test. We have to give a shot to a fellow student, IM, ventral-gluteal, 23 gauge, 1 inch, approx 1.5cc saline. Blah- Blah -blah....and then came my turn ( I was the next to last).......I forgot to wipe the site with alcohol on Sandy's hip, and failed right then and there. I did not even get the shot off. BOOM - just like that. I was trying to remember a dozen things at once, plus doing something for the first time, trying to get the Z-track with a automatic retractable syringe that you have to press hard on at the end of the injection in order for it to retract. You think I am walking with a chip on my shoulder???? Please :-( I'm an injection failure. I failed injection LAB and have to retest all over again. Happy thanksgiving.

close