Hospital Nurses - page 5

Yesterday at clinicals I asked our instructor, at the end of the day's group meeting, what a nursing student should do if the nurses atthe rehab center I was at won't talk to you, when you attempt to... Read More

  1. by   Q.
    I think I know Mario well enough through this BB, and by his posts, that he is NOT looking for "what he wants to hear" as some people here seem to assume.

    Mario is looking for feedback. And he's man enough to know that here are always TWO perspectives to a situation. He's a frustrated student; we are frustrated nurses.
  2. by   Youda
    Originally posted by Pretzlgl
    Youda - I don't think anyone became critical until Mario posted this. I agree - this should not become a bashing fest; just realize that when he stated the above he kind of opened the barn doors shall we say.
    OK. Point understood. I just don't like to see several people starting to criticize one person. That's usually when a thread turns ugly as the person being criticized usually starts to defend themselves, then the other person responds, then all hell breaks loose. You all know what I'm talking about. OK to present another point of view or to call someone on a negative post. Not OK to start mobbing. If we all agree to that, then please continue and forgive my interruption. My post wasn't meant to be defensive or argumentative or critical, just a reminder.
  3. by   rebelwaclause
    Off Topic:
    Man-o-man. Send me an updated list of moderators. Thanks.

    On Topic:
    I agree with all that's been said. If you find a rude nurse who doesn't want to be bothered, find a nice one. Didn't we learn this in the sandbox way back when when "Jimmie" wouldn't play with us?

    And - Research your own assigned patients BEFORE soliciting help. This is the best advise I could've ever learned while in nursing school. When you're a nurse on the floor you will have this skill to a science without being a "weak link" nurse. You'll remember to listen to report from nurses reporting off BUT DO YOUR OWN RESEARCH on your patient and not rely solely on the report of another nurse who could've missed an entire days worth of MD orders for all you know. (I take most reports as a grain of salt until I know and trust a nurses skills)

    Finally - I'm Sorry. I never acknowledged you by agreeing student nursing can be a *itch, Mario. I remember wondering why some of the nurses I encountered while in clinical where in fact nurses. Some can be mean as hell both to you, other staff, patients and anyone else - And STILL collect a paycheck each week. These are the ones that are burned-out without a plan "B". Don't worry about them, just worry about your education. As said in a prior post, there are nice nurses who enjoy seeing students on the floor and are more than willing to offer you their wisdom. Find one, lock on, and learn as much as you can.
    Last edit by rebelwaclause on Nov 24, '02
  4. by   micro
    Originally posted by mario_ragucci
    no offense was taken baseline or pretselgirl. I just ask out loud to the world "what happened to nurturing a nursing student, and being courteous? This is a serious thing to me, really. I really want to learn, and I am, and it's all positive in the end (before it gets through my forcefield and phospho-lipid membrane, lol. I don't want to suffer with a trans-cerebral ischemic attack trying to figure out and deal with someone else's depresssion.

    Whatever happened to common couresty and respect, let alone for nurturing nursing students. Nurturing with respect to our fellow coworkers and colleagues of all disciplines.
    There is a song that says something like, "the times they are a changing".................
    Mario, hang in there my friend. It is not someone else's depression, which I know you know. It is just the somebody else. People............go figure.
    Nurses are a bunch of people, mainly female, not all and the gender doesn't truly matter. But the human imperfection is a fact.
    Some people know how to give and get respect. Some people know how to care and to be cared for. Some people know their strengths and weaknesses. And some people are just _________. Be true to yourself and learn from all.
    You got it, just use it. :-)

    be well all,
    gotta go to work.........
    boohoo!!!!! but it pays the bills and it ain't a bad way to earn a paycheck............
    do I like being a nurse, yes.....most of the time.........

    micro
  5. by   LoisJean
    The tone of voice, eye contact, facial expression, body movement--these things tell a student what area they fall into in terms of the food chain on a unit. It is not expected that the unit nurse is going to 'coddle' the student--, but there is a big difference between professionality and professionalism. The greatest example to a nursing student is the unit nurse who can give a sincere answer to a question--even if the answer is: "I am sorry, I don't have time to help you-please see your instructor"/ or "I apologize right now but I really need to tend to this chart. Hold on until I'm through, perhaps I can help you then".

    It's so much easier to be haughty. It's a good way to get someone to go away quickly. But the haughty and arrogant nurse is so often the one who has taken her professional role and made it a god-an ism. She becomes untouchable- unreachable- unpleasant.

    The nursing student who is already raw around the edges and is still not used to the constant criticism (constructive or not) from their instructors, is bound to become even more paranoid when treated like a bug with nor more worth than to flicked back onto the floor.

    There is no point in these attitudes. They serve no purpose in regards to 'teaching' a student how the real world of nursing is...in fact those attitudes may cause some students to act the same when they become REAL nurses, too.

    And, from my experience as a patient in a hospital--let me just say that my care was delivered by student nurses...they did not have the time nor the permission to join in the raucous and totally inappropriate goings on behind the nurses station where the constant jabbering about nonsensical things like "Have you checked out Doctor Bob's buns?", and, "Guess what, my daughter started her period last night" were the earful that myself and every other patient on that unit were forced to listen to. I suppose I don't have to mention the gaffaws of laughter at all the jokes being thrown around up and down the halls way past the midnight hour, various slams and bangs and nurses yelling at the old guy three rooms down to "OPEN YOUR MOUTH SO I CAN SEE IF YOU SWALLOWED THAT PILL--OPEN YOUR MOUTH; I SAID, OPEN UP----Screeeeeech-like nails on a blackboard. Imagine the bad mood I put them in when I dragged my 'confined to bed' self -i.v. pole and all - out to the station and told them to shut the *F* up. (That after having tried my call light and waiting 45 minutes without anyone answering it).

    So, all I'm saying is that we all get in someone's way, and on someone's nerves once in awhile. Give the nursing students a bit of a break and be -at least civil. I still think Mario's right in his observations and his questions beg unit nurses to take a look at themselves and the example they are eliciting.

    Peace,
    Lois Jean
  6. by   baseline
    I agree with just about everything that has been said....and I think my previous posts have been very clear on how I feel on the subject. I am not terrorizing Mario....and I have kept my tone moderate and I do tease him on occasion...."cause he needs to lighten up!!!.......But he did open the whoopass can when he said:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Originally posted by mario_ragucci
    If you have issues with your work load, or can not handle your tasks without them turning you into the wicked witch (or warlock) of the west, then do yourself a favor and bow out.

    Yall nippers out there may get away with doing that to some patients and some staff/students, but not all of us are gonna take it. It don't have to be that way, and no one should bark at or nip anyone at any time. If your too busy to think, then make some serious introspective looks. Don't let your mental state become a stacked deck of cards and when someone ask you a question about a PT you colapse.

    And Mario? Were you in the Army?
  7. by   mario_ragucci
    I'm sorry about my post making fun of short nerved people. The incident that started this happened at a sniff during clinicals. I don't mean to belly ache about it, and I don't want anyone to think this is a big deal. I am just like everybody else, and everyone has events that bother them more than others.
    Contempt really upsets me. When contempt is directed at me, I, admittedly am thrown.
    Like, if I was in the Marine Corps, and i saluted an officer, and the officer didn't salute me back, I'd jump all in the officers world. Don't we owe each other common respect and dignity as care providers? Don't try to legitamize scorn or contempt as by-products of stress. They are not. I understand about "sand box mentality" and "people who are scorned beyond recognition."
    If you want to defend angry staff who can only greet and be courteous with certain other staff, you are well within your right to do so. But don't try to legitamize the at random acts of emotional violence which accompany this behavior.
  8. by   baseline
    Refer to previous posts! I have no more to add! Keep at it Mario, you'll be ok..
  9. by   Q.
    Originally posted by rebelwaclause
    Off Topic:
    Man-o-man. Send me an updated list of moderators. Thanks.

  10. by   ktwlpn
    Originally posted by Youda
    OK. Point understood. I just don't like to see several people starting to criticize one person. That's usually when a thread turns ugly as the person being criticized usually starts to defend themselves, then the other person responds, then all hell breaks loose. You all know what I'm talking about. OK to present another point of view or to call someone on a negative post. Not OK to start mobbing. If we all agree to that, then please continue and forgive my interruption. My post wasn't meant to be defensive or argumentative or critical, just a reminder.
    I know that you are hyper-aware of mobbing type situations because of your personal experiences here on this board and at work but I don't think that is the case here......I don't see where anyone was bashed or flamed....We have all been respectful and no one has resorted to name calling or personal attacks. I believe (as someone suggested) that this thread belongs in the student nursing forum-a student really has NO idea what being a nurse is truly all about...Not until you are out there with a heavy patient load of your own....
  11. by   Teshiee
    Mario, just play the game. Students sometimes get screwed over when you are totally innocent. I was on a clinical rotation and I asked the UNIT SECty a simple question she snapped at me like I owed her money. I snapped back but guess who got in trouble? Moi! It seems like you have no rights but just remember it is not forever.
  12. by   baseline
    Unit secretaries very often get snapped at as a matter of course. Sorry guys. Life should always be fair....but its not....not for me, not for you....not for most people. I have a good life....and a good job and I've had a great career....but on any given day I can be snapped at...by a co-worker, a physician by my hunny. Most of the time I shrug it off...sometimes I bite back. Like I said before...we are all imperfect human beings. All trying to cope.
  13. by   mario_ragucci
    Youda - thank you for your help in recognizing and calling off the ambush i was headed for. Via this thread, i have gained keen insight into the way students learn at clinical sights and the way some nurses differ in their approach to learning. Everyone has generated excellent learning, and no right or wrong is called. It's just a variety that goes along with people :-) Granted, a students life is not valued as much as an RN's life because students haven't put their time in. I realy enjoyed reading everyones posts and respect everyone, what a great thing alnurses.com is to people and to nurses. Amen.

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