Homelessness - page 4

If you graduate nursing school, assuming you were living with your parents, and you had a lot of student loans and your parents said, "You graduated, now, get out" and you found a job as an RN in a... Read More

  1. by   ventmommy
    I'm not sure where you live but if it's a city, check into housesitting. I graduated high school 24 years ago. I have a school mate that has NEVER had place of his own. He has housesat for 24 years in San Francisco. He has a backpack and a suitcase and a PO Box. No kids, no spouse, no car, no bills except for cell phone. And he gets paid to live in nice houses.
  2. by   nursesunny
    I see lots of comments about showering. A $50 gym membership gives you a restroom, shower, steam room, pool, etc...just saying...I actually got this tip from a homeless patient who had a stipend he used for a gym membership for just that purpose.
  3. by   Beldar_the_Cenobite
    Quote from Accolay
    Another option could be living in a storage unit or renting a cheap office space. I have seen youtube videos on this.
    I'll have to look on youtube for that. I think there were metal bands like Death and Morbid Angel during the early 90s who did that in Florida. They would rehearse songs in storage units too. I wonder if the gates are like 24 hours or something where you could go in when you get off for the night and sleep. I could climb the fence but I'll be 31 by the time i graduate. I'm 29 now, I feel like I'm 45 already.
  4. by   caliotter3
    Managers at storage facilities have told me they have law enforcement deal with those caught attempting to live in storage containers. I don't think criminal trespass charges would bode well for professional licensing. Don't recommend it.
  5. by   Pghfoxfan1
    You may be able to rent a room in someone's house till you can get on your feet
  6. by   hherrn
    Nobody at work cares where you live. Nobody at work will know where you live unless you tell them.

    As far as the van- Why not? You need to make sure you get a good night sleep, and show up to work on time. For some people, camping or living a bit rough is a hardship, for others it is normal. I have lived in a 22 foot sailboat while working as a nurse. I know nurses who would consider my house a hardship- no cable TV, no take out, and come home to a cold house and have to turn the heater on.
  7. by   Libby1987
    I think you're way ahead of yourself and if you were my kid I would say 1) save your money but wait til you're closer to graduation (you're 3 yrs out?) before over thinking it and closing off other options, 2) renting a room with laundry and kitchen privileges close to work/public transportation will save a significant amount of money in terms of gas/insurance/repairs/maintenance and other "convenvience" costs.
  8. by   Flatline
    I know many travel nurses that literally live out of their RVs and trailers full-time. They get a local P.O. Box for a period of time and receive their mail there.
  9. by   elkpark
    #Vanlife, the Bohemian Social-Media Movement | The New Yorker

    Just saw this since I've been following this thread (yes, I'm wayyyyyy behind on my issues of TNY).
  10. by   Paws2people
    When I first commented on this, I believed that you had already graduated and had gotten your first RN job due to your original post. I thought this housing situation was an immediate problem of yours. Now I am confused.

    Do you have a place to live still or not? Was this just a hypothetical post?
  11. by   Paws2people
    Quote from Libby1987
    I think you're way ahead of yourself and if you were my kid I would say 1) save your money but wait til you're closer to graduation (you're 3 yrs out?) before over thinking it and closing off other options, 2) renting a room with laundry and kitchen privileges close to work/public transportation will save a significant amount of money in terms of gas/insurance/repairs/maintenance and other "convenvience" costs.

    Yes, that's my thinking exactly. If you still have 3 yrs left at your current home, might as well make it 4 and save up money that way instead of all this van talk.
  12. by   sasera
    My husband and I are house-less by choice. We live in a cargo van. We owned a house (well, actually, the bank owned it...mortgage and all that...), but we decided we didn't want to be tied down to such a huge debt. Not to mention that we can now "live" wherever we want, whenever we want. My husband is a military officer and I am still in school, but we are clean and put together and if I didn't tell you about my living situation, you would never guess it.

    We live in a medium level cost of living area (metropolitain southwest) and it is much cheaper living the way we do than when we rented an apartment or owned a house. This may vary based on where you live, though. Our monthly expenses are a mailbox at the UPS store, a gym membership for free showers, and propane for the small heater and stove we use. Plus gas and maintenance for the van (but you'd have that in a car, too), and all the other normal expenses of life, like food. We have a few solar panels for electricity so we can charge cell phones and computers. And in case you're wondering, there are many ways to use the bathroom when you live in a van, and most of them are not-at-all gross.

    Where you park the van depends on where you live. We stay mostly on the military base because there are a million parking lots that we can blend into. But we've stayed at Walmart, 24-hour grocery stores, on the street in residential neighborhoods, on National Forest/National Park/BLM land, and in hospital parking lots. Once, when desperate to find a place to sleep while we were travelling, we stayed in the parking lot in front of a mechanic shop. We figured if the cops bothered us (they didn't) we would just say we broke down and were waiting for the mechanic to open. We made sure to leave before the mechanic showed up in the morning. We've never had a problem with other people or police. Check the laws of the municipality you're staying in. Some places do not allow overnight street parking, some do. We do move to a different parking lot or at least a different part of the parking lot very frequently, but I think that's just me being paranoid.

    There are a million more things I could tell you about living in a van, but I'll leave you with a youtube channel to look up: Cheap RV Living. Although it says "RV," this guy lives in a van and interviews others who do as well. We have learned a lot from this channel, and if you are serious about living in a van, I would advise you check it out. Like someone above said, your employer and your colleagues won't know you are "house-less" unless you tell them. Good luck!
  13. by   Have Nurse
    Perhaps you might be able to rent a Post Office box at the Post Office? You could use your present address for now, as you are still living there.

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