Hey, Managers! What's up with the "weeding out" of good nurses? - page 8

Recently there's been a spate of write-ups I've heard about that are basically bogus. Minor infractions that no one else would get written up over. I'm furious. On the surface, it doesn't seem to... Read More

  1. by   mart18642
    Wao.......I did not think that this type of staff was happening until now. The hospital that I work for years did the same and got rid of a lots good experience nurses that way, some got fired........and one funny thing that they did was if you wanted to know if you position was going to be fill just look at the ad in the news paper and you will find that you were going to be replace that way. Ex. an employee who has been working in this particular hospital for approx. 25+ years, saw that his job was being advertized and the news paper ................then a couple weeks later they fired him because they were going to eliminate department.......what a blow......

    Now they are back to square one whole bunch of new grads and agencies nurses.what a disaster.......now they are trying to hired experienced nurses by giving them more money..............is a no ending battle..........:uhoh21:
  2. by   twograce
    mmanagers get the idea they want to dictate what happens on "their" unit. They can't do that if they have "seasoned" staff, who will stand up against their bogus ideas of granduer. Whereas, new grads and travelers, are not as bold.
  3. by   erichnj
    Angie, I can completely relate and assure you this happens all the time in all types of organizations to all types of individuals, no matter what their position within the company.

    I was at a Director level for 10 years, moved up the ranks thru hard work and dedication, had top performing teams reporting to me. Had the accolades from my superiors, industry and company recognition and great reviews throughout.

    Then, WHAM!, top management changed. All of a sudden, I found myself in a precarious situation. I was no longer involved in key discussions, kept out of strategic meetings and no longer had access to allies within the company. Remember, it's your friends and allies that are your greatest assets during these trying times. Then, I started hearing rumours that my performance was being questioned behind closed doors. Soon after, my teams were broken up beacause of a "re-org", my managers were fired and I was left with a small group. All of these were done with underhanded tactics used by the new mgmt and their new cronies. Of course, not being one to take any of this lying down, I was "fighting" all of this with whatever arsenal I had left at my disposal. But, the more you fight, the more you are looked at as a non-team player and your descent is accelerated even faster. And, it is a a descent to drive you out.

    In the end, I realized that I was wasting a lot of time, effort and energy on these battles and my work performance, indeed, started to suffer. Once that happened, I had to make a choice and that was to leave the company.

    Looking back, it was the best decision I ever made. I was able to launch a very successful healthcare recruiting company. The lesson learned was that everything happens for a reason. Do the best you can do and learn from the experiences life places in front of you on a daily basis.

    Eric
  4. by   IreneL
    my daughter's manager made her life so miserable that after 4 years she took a traveling job. then her nurse manager wouldn't give her a referance other than a beginning date and an ending date of employment. Thankfully she was able to back up her skills with education credentials and references from the Dr.'s she worked with. Needless to say the change-over in help there is high, even new nurses aren't staying very long. This is really sad and scares me as I am going to be an RN next May.
  5. by   baileyboo923
    Yes ... I know about the "weeding out" of the good nurses. I worked in the Peds ICU for 15 years and finally quit because of all the political BS that goes on. They weeded out the best manager I had ever had (one that could actually do my job and do patient care without freaking out!) they then hired a witch that has a Nurse Practitioner degree that has NEVER worked in a Peds ICU!!! I'm sure it was because she was "cheaper." She is wicked too!!!! I don't understand why she has a Nurse practitioner degree and works in thid position???
    Nursing sure isn't what it use to be and I doubt if I will ever go back!!!
    Kim
  6. by   shabry
    Worked for a co. for 10 years that was just like this and saw many people hurt and fired over stupid write ups. I could see my time time coming so I transfered to another facility in Dallas about 3 years ago and I have to say they are not at all like that. They don't have time for those little games. The only change I have seen them make in that direction was to get rid of agency and hire more prn's and part-time nurses. I am glad I was able to leave the other job and I feel much more secure in this facility. Many places are like that but not all so try to leave the one you are at as soon as possible and find a place that will appreciate a good nurse.
  7. by   baileyboo923
    Amen sister!!!!
    Kim

    Quote from twograce
    mmanagers get the idea they want to dictate what happens on "their" unit. They can't do that if they have "seasoned" staff, who will stand up against their bogus ideas of granduer. Whereas, new grads and travelers, are not as bold.
  8. by   malinne
    Angie,

    That's deplorable, but I know it does happen. I don't understand it. I manage three units and I can tell you--I'll do practically anything to retain my experienced staff or to hire in an RN with experience. I've even had to go up against HR because they didn't want to offer as much as I thought was needed to get a nurse to sign-on.

    We have quite a few GN's too. But if you just go for the lower $, you sacrifice quality of patient care. There is NO substitute for experience!
  9. by   jerimane
    Angie,
    I agree-happened to me-I am taking legal action-filed complaint with eeoc-age discrimination and wrongful termination-eeoc issued right to sue this past week-however this action did get me out of a bad situation that is getting worse at the hospital I worked at-I am going to work at a much nicer hospital close by that has good openings in my field. I am in n.c. and there is an article by dr. carol swink on the ncbon.com website in the n.c. nursing bulletin which talks some about this-nc bon had to come up with a program which I am enrolled in because no remediation was given to me, when it has been for younger ones-I am going in oct. to be re-instated, I never would have thought this could happen to me, but I have fought back and have physician supporters.
  10. by   lamazeteacher
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    Recently there's been a spate of write-ups I've heard about that are basically bogus. Minor infractions that no one else would get written up over. I'm furious.

    On the surface, it doesn't seem to be a big deal. But anyone who's been in health care can tell you--our nursing culture teaches us that bogus write-ups are a warning to get outta Dodge; it's useless to fight; easier to just change units.

    So these nurses have all left for greener pastures.

    I have a sneaking suspicion that the nurses were targeted because they earned more than new grads. Because coincidentally, there are a few new grads on each of these units, and the basic "numbers" of the nurses has not changed. In years.

    So 'fess up, Managers, what's the deal? Is this what really is happening out there? Is your budget such that it looks better for you to keep the new grads rather than the experienced nurses? Do you use bogus writeups to "encourage" certain nurses to leave?

    Or is something else afoot here?
    I agree with your statements, and wish to add an additional impetus for managers eliminating good nurses. As (gag) a 67 year old old (with all my faculties) I have been plagued for the past 10 years, with at least 5 situations such as you described. Come to find out that employers are charged more (duh!) for aged employees, now. So (in)Human Resources gets into the act, screaming "get rid of (her/him). It's costing us money".
    I learned that hard, cruel fact from a friend who owns a large business. When her husband turned 65, their health insurance company wouldn't
    recognize Medicare as the "primary" coverage, and charged $900./month for his insurance alone! That's worse than the banks' charges now.
    Anothger fact hard learned when I took (prescribed) enteric coated Ibuprophen and had a Gastric Hemorrhage and bills you wouldn't believe (Iron IV infusions cost $2,000. each, more than blood transfusions - I'd only accept one of those). Of course Medicare paid what they thought should be the charge (after all, older patients shrink, and take up less space?), and now the healthycare providers, institutions, etc. want their pounds of flesh. Not only does the Medicare B cost of $150. monthly come out of my paltry social security check, but it only pays 80%, so another "supplemental" Medigap policy for another $150./month is needed (that the insurance companies say pays all of the rest...... Medicare D is a joke. The monthly costs for that, when more than one drug company's products is needed (I have 3, from 3 different companies), is more than the medication would cost outright - in Canada, where I come from, and I use my sister's neighborhood pharmacy.
    The need for "single party" health insurance in the U.S. is dire, yet most people distrust anything the government does here, so it's back to Canada for me, and hopefully meaningful employment there. However my children will remain here, and I'll see my grandchildren less often, not a good thing.
  11. by   Deb2
    I recently left an organization after a conversation with the OD and manager of my unit (who by the way was mysteriously struck mute during this meeting) in HR that would probably pass as a comedy routine. You all know the one that goes ". . you can't quit because I'm firing you. . "
    It started almost a year prior with the then new OD (3rd in 5 years) calling me aside to tell me that with the start date of our new manager (also 3rd in 5 years) it would be a clean slate for all . . . except apparently me. She then proceeded to tell me what a horrible person I am, that I am a "major player" (no definition although I asked 3 separate times) and that she would be watching me. OK, forwarned. Why didn't I just look elsewhere then - beats me except that I really liked my coworkers and felt an obligation to my already understaffed unit.
    Then came the barely recognizable complaints. When I asked for documentation it was VERY slow to come. Since we chart on computers and I don't have access to the archived material I had to ask repeatedly for access. I finally was able to review charting and present my point of view and suggested they talk with coworkers who were present. Needless to say nothing I said was taken as anything near the truth and the coworkers were not consulted. Why confuse the issue with the truth?
    In the middle of this I was significantly injured by an out of control patient. The manager made inappropriate comments about my ability to work with the injury and then would almost immediately contradict her first statement. The OD who was fully aware of the extent of the injury never so much as said 'stinks to be you' although I saw her almost every shift I worked. While I did wonder if they would take advantage of that situation they did not.
    When I returned to regular duties full time the same quality of complaints started immediately. Why didn't I just leave then? I truly believed that the quality of their comments to and about me would never stand up. There was never a complaint about the quality of care I provide my patients.
    In this same time period this OD fired one manager, after she gave her notice, two house supervisors, two RTs (and hired one that reeks of old, haven't bathed in a while cigarette smoke) - after they exposed the fact that the 'smoke detector' in their office space was actually a camera -, a lab tech and two more nurses.
    Although this hospital is a part of a larger organization it is a relatively small, originally "community" hospital. All this activity was having a very negative effect on the staff and young nurses were leaving almost before they could finish orientation.
    As far as HR goes, NO help there. I submitted a complaint about these activities that went NOWHERE but the HR managers desk. The HR manager went so far as to threaten me when I declined to schedule a meeting for 8AM following 3 scheduled 12 hour night shifts.
    OK, this is one of those things where you had to be there. I recognize that the more I protest the guiltier I sound and believe me I have spent many hours reexamining the issues to find a way to correct whatever it was that brought on this attack by the OD and manager.
    After 22 years of nursing I'm not sure I care to continue. Fortunately for me no one is going to go hungry if I do not work.
    Why does this kind of abuse continue in a profession that should be nurturing and empathic? I don't have an answer.
  12. by   WhatNext?
    Quote from jenni82104
    So, is it better to quit, or make them fire you?
    My lawyer asked me why I didn't quit a job that became toxic and eventually ended when I got fired.

    The lesson I took away from that comment is that it is better to leave a job when you realize you can't seem to do anything right (another view of being targeted).
  13. by   crystalcross1
    I recently graduated a LVN program and have not began working yet, but what you are talking about reminds me a great deal of nursing school. We had teachers who would rally together to try to get rid ofcertain students and other teachers who would hang out with students and talk crap about the others. I made it through because I kept my mouth shut and didn't get involved with other peoples battles. I believe that ultimatly nurses out there will eat there own. And what makes it worse is we fight against each other and concentrate on our own personal problems and forget about the paitents. Our Pts should never know what is happening outside of their doors. I wish nursing was the way it used to be. when it was a discipline a true proffession of compassion rather than a profession of what we can do to make ourselves look good or to cut costs for our company so we get a big bonus every three months.

    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    Recently there's been a spate of write-ups I've heard about that are basically bogus. Minor infractions that no one else would get written up over. I'm furious.

    On the surface, it doesn't seem to be a big deal. But anyone who's been in health care can tell you--our nursing culture teaches us that bogus write-ups are a warning to get outta Dodge; it's useless to fight; easier to just change units.

    So these nurses have all left for greener pastures.

    I have a sneaking suspicion that the nurses were targeted because they earned more than new grads. Because coincidentally, there are a few new grads on each of these units, and the basic "numbers" of the nurses has not changed. In years.

    So 'fess up, Managers, what's the deal? Is this what really is happening out there? Is your budget such that it looks better for you to keep the new grads rather than the experienced nurses? Do you use bogus writeups to "encourage" certain nurses to leave?

    Or is something else afoot here?

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