Hey, Managers! What's up with the "weeding out" of good nurses? - page 6

Recently there's been a spate of write-ups I've heard about that are basically bogus. Minor infractions that no one else would get written up over. I'm furious. On the surface, it doesn't seem to... Read More

  1. by   jenni82104
    So, is it better to quit, or make them fire you?
  2. by   TazziRN
    Dunno.....sometimes it looks worse to be a quitter than to be fired.
  3. by   UM Review RN
    Quote from jenni82104
    So, is it better to quit, or make them fire you?

    I think it would depend on the situation.

    If you are a new grad, mistakes are predictable, and write-ups will happen. A new grad's approach to a counseling or a write-up should be to show a willingness to take responsibility, learn, apologise, and move on.

    In fact, insofar as new grads are concerned, I would just file away this information, but it really cannot apply to you by virtue of the fact that you are too new.

    This thread is really directed to the more experienced nurses, ones who have proven themselves to be of good calibre, and who have worked for years in their specialty without a problem.

    Sorry if you new grads feel that by discussing this topic, you're going to be scared away from nursing--and I hope you please take this in the spirit in which it is intended, because I know it's going to sound pretty harsh--but if all it takes to scare you away from nursing is a thread on an Internet BB by someone you've never met before, well, I have to think that maybe you weren't too committed in the first place.
  4. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from jenni82104
    so, is it better to quit, or make them fire you?
    [font="comic sans ms"]i guess it depends upon the situation. i'd opt for finding a new job first, then quitting -- that would be the smartest thing. we don't always do the smartest thing, though. personally, this last time, i got angry and quit a week before christmas. (what could i do -- my house sold immediately!) i moved 3000 miles without a job, telephone interviewing with travel companies as i drove cross country with all my worldly goods. i landed on my feet.
  5. by   JenNJFLCA
    I think the system sets us up to fail, to be honest. Some people will exploit that to their advantage, and thus we have the situation that the OP presented. I have had my license for a little over a month and truly admire all the nurses that have stayed on the floor for so many years. I don't know if I'll last more than 5....I love being a nurse and am proud of my accomplishments, but it's going to be hard for me to stay working in hospitals where I see patients suffering because of the inefficiency of the health care system. I don't know if I'm really helping these people or improving their quality of life.
  6. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from gonzo1
    new grads make less money, are usually more malleable, afraid to speak up, often have fewer health issues, what's not to love. Keep them till they start to "command" more money and then push them out and bring in some more new grads. Ever wonder why there are so many "new grads" at the bedside. And of course they burn out after a couple of years. Hopefully they won't leave nursing completely, but it seems like a lot do.The whole new grad thing is causing a little problem on my floor now because 80 percent of them are pregnant. I don't know how we are going to staff soon.
    Exactly, exactly. You think mgmt would see some of the advantages of older nurses. For one thing, many of us will never have to take a maternity leave!
  7. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    Exactly, exactly. You think mgmt would see some of the advantages of older nurses. For one thing, many of us will never have to take a maternity leave!
    Sorry, just had to respond . . . I'm an older nurse (49) with a 5 year old I gave birth to. :wink2:

    Actually, the newer nurses I see are less apt to take the crap that older nurses did when they first started.

    At least in my experience.

    steph
  8. by   TazziRN
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    Exactly, exactly. You think mgmt would see some of the advantages of older nurses. For one thing, many of us will never have to take a maternity leave!
    Um........*raising hand*......first child born at age 42........surprise packages happen all over the age spectrum!
  9. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from TazziRN
    Um........*raising hand*......first child born at age 42........surprise packages happen all over the age spectrum!




    It is fun, isn't it.

    Right now my 5 year old has his black cowboy hat on and is putting batteries in his "Elvis" swinging hips clock while listening to Toby Keith.

    Not to worry - my oldest boys used to wear Wranglers and listen to "I really really really like girls" . . .now they wouldn't go near Wranglers and listen to all kinds of music.

    Back to the regularly scheduled topic . . . .


    steph
  10. by   Tweety
    You have to admit though most babies are born to younger nurses, under 40. But that shouldn't even be a consideration.

    I seriously doubt there is widescale weeding out of "older" which includes us in our 40's, nurses. Isn't the average age like 45 or something like that. I know when the Hunter came in and recommended a massive layoff of nurses, it was the younger one's who got the axe, but for some LPNs who got the axe because they were LPNs.

    I'm not saying it doesn't happen.

    http://www.kumc.edu/news/publish/article_00816.shtml
    Last edit by Tweety on Sep 5, '06
  11. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from Tweety
    You have to admit though most babies are born to younger nurses, under 40. But that shouldn't even be a consideration.

    I seriously doubt there is widescale weeding out of "older" which includes us in our 40's, nurses. Isn't the average age like 45 or something like that. I know when the Hunter came in and recommended a massive layoff of nurses, it was the younger one's who got the axe, but for some LPNs who got the axe because they were LPNs.

    I'm not saying it doesn't happen.

    http://www.kumc.edu/news/publish/article_00816.shtml

    I agree with your first point - I just couldn't resist.

    As to older nurses getting the ax first, I agree with your point that there probably isn't widespread weeding out going on.

    And there are many articles on the difference between generations of nurses - the main difference being younger nurses seem not to put up with mandatory overtime and unsafe staffing ratios - they seem to quit within a year or two.

    When I started working 9 years ago at age 40, at first I bought into the work ethic at the expense of family and personal health and well being. But that changed fast when I found myself preggers.

    My family is first. And I'm not the answer to the hospital's staffing problems.

    We are hurting for nurses here . . . there is no weeding out. The amount of $$ spent on agency nurses and cna's at my hospital is causing a real budget problem.

    steph
  12. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    As I said, many of us older nurses will never have to take maternity leave.
    As I am childfree by choice, I didn't have to take it as a young woman, either.
    I have always ensured that a certain package is well wrapped, so that I don't receive a surprise package of my own.:imbar

    At the unit where I recently completed a contract, about 1/3 of the twenty-somethings were out on baby leave.
  13. by   TazziRN
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    I have always ensured that a certain package is well wrapped, so that I don't receive a surprise package of my own.:imbar
    Heh heh........I didn't think I would need wrapping paper, since I was told that my container was empty.......

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