Here We Go Again...

  1. Back in 2000, a small hospital (hospital "x") in our area was having severe problems due to extremely abusive management and poor financial decisions, ultimately leading to bankruptcy. Two-thirds of the nursing staff left this institution--all you could hear was the thunderous roar of feet. There was so much bitterness that spilled over into the media and the whole surrounding community became incensed about the goings-on at the hospital. Many of the nurses and staff went to hospital "y." Hospital "x" nearly didn't survive. Thankfully, due to a big management change, 3 years later hospital "x" is flourishing. Now, hospital "y" is having severe financial and management problems. Several nursing department managers have been fired in the shake-up (the old "doctor doesn't like the job the nurse manager is doing" argument). The hospital is losing money due to poor financial decisions (news is plastered on the front page of the newspaper) and, of course, nursing staff is targeted since "nurses are the biggest financial expense." (Employee pension funds have not been funded, pay is very poor, and raises are nonexistent. Why is it that nursing staff always has to "pay" for poor financial decisions made by the facility? ) Now, nursing staff is leaving this facility in DROVES and going back to hospital "x." It's sad to see this going on and realizing how powerless nurses are in these management power games. All we can do is answer with our feet. Loyalty to one institution just doesn't exist anymore .
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   jnette
    ~ shaking head sadly~......

    kinda makes us feel like we're the proverbial sheep or cattle... we are either being herded or moving on by ourselves... to graze greener pastures elsewhere.... always.
  4. by   live4today
    originally posted by jnette
    ~ shaking head sadly~......

    kinda makes us feel like we're the proverbial sheep or cattle... we are either being herded or moving on by ourselves... to graze greener pastures elsewhere.... always.
    mooooooooooooooooo!!! :chuckle :roll :chuckle
  5. by   nowplayingEDRN
    How very sad
  6. by   sjoe
    "Why is it that nursing staff always has to "pay" for poor financial decisions made by the facility?"

    Simply because we will. We don't organize and truly kick any butt but try to "make things work out somehow" instead. Of course we get this kind of treatment.
    Last edit by sjoe on Aug 8, '03
  7. by   VickyRN
    ...most often we nurses answer with our feet, moving every few years as working conditions change.
  8. by   passing thru
    Don't the nurses also lose benefits with all this changing? As in building up retirement and 401 K benefits?
    That would save the corporations big bucks....I think the companies know exactly what they are doing.

    Retired women receive thousands of dollars less each year in retirement dollars , than men, - - - although they both worked 30 + years.

    Women , typically, are still near the poverty level.

    Unless, UNLESS , they are receiving $$$ from a deceased spouses' retirement account.
  9. by   altomga
    okay Vicky...I read the same article!! It is very sad that b/c of the administrator decisions the nursing staff is suffering...I totally agree. Couple of years ago the "larger" hospital in the area offered to take the burden off of them (and the other smaller hospital)..but if you remember they wanted the money from "larger" hospital, but did not want their hands in the cookie jar (persay)...give me the money, but stay out of our business!!

    Like you said, the nurses have no control and unfortunately the nurses that had loyalty and retired from there now get no pension money....but the hospital seemed to have the funds to build the large extension for the MRI/radiology dept????
    Makes you wonder
  10. by   sjoe
    "most often we nurses answer with our feet, moving every few years as working conditions change."

    The last I read about it (a week or two ago), the annual turnover rate for RNs in the US is 26%! Something to think about, those of you who think that pension programss are a real issue.
  11. by   Tweety
    Originally posted by sjoe
    "most often we nurses answer with our feet, moving every few years as working conditions change."

    The last I read about it (a week or two ago), the annual turnover rate for RNs in the US is 26%! Something to think about, those of you who think that pension programss are a real issue.
    Is that all? I would have thought it was higher. I guess I can't tell because we have so many travelers and contract nurses at our facility, especially during "season". But I would have thought it was higher. I wonder how that compares with other professions.

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