Help with my goal please?

  1. Hey guys, I was hoping some of you can help me and give me some advice, Let me first start out by saying I am only 17 and a high school dropout, I quit going in the middle of 9th grade so I am not so educated, In febuary I will be 18 and will be able to start my GED classes, My career goal is to become a CRNA, I want to help people not feel any pain and make sure they keep breathing through operations, I would like to graduate with a CRNA license by the time I am 30, What would be your recomended method of accomplishing this goal, AND, Is this a realalistic goal?

    I was thinking (ged - pre req's - bsn - (2 years of icu even though 1 is minumum I want 2 to show I am serious about it and then the msn/crna program?

    Please don't discourage me because that doesn't help me, just please give me your opinion on how I can get to the ultimate goal. Thanks guys
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   RedhairedNurse
    Sounds like you've got it down, just hopefully you can obtain this goal by 30. Maybe a couple of yrs later, but who knows, If your smart, may be sooner. I wish you well and good luck.

    One thing I should add, I had a teacher that taught me to start with short term goals first, it's okay to have a long term goal in mind which is the CRNA, but keep one goal in mind as you go, like first short term goal, master GED, etc.
  4. by   itsmejuli
    Long term goals are great, but its the short term goals that will get you through each day and keep your feet on the ground.

    Get your GED then get CNA or PCT training so you can get a job in a hospital.

    If you're lucky you'll find a hospital that will pay for your education
  5. by   MB37
    Some of these steps may take less time than I'm giving you, but this would get you done by 30.

    Age 18: Study, take GED review class, take GED

    18-19: Enroll in community college, meet with advisor, discuss what is needed for pre-nursing at local CC and university offering BSN. As other poster suggested, consider taking a CNA course or preparing in some other way to get a hospital job and begin to be exposed to the profession.

    19-20: Take pre-nursing courses, seeking help from tutors, study groups, anything available on campus that you need to ensure good grades, since you are probably out of practice for studying. Consider whether or not you can afford to get a BSN immediately, or if you'll need to get your ADN first. Either way, take BSN prerequisites as well - you'll need them eventually.

    21: Apply to nursing programs, wherever you've decided you'd like to go. Try to keep your grades competitive (more As than Bs, avoid Cs and lower). If you are placed on a wait list (which many community colleges do), continue taking BSN prereqs and consider applying to the university program - you may graduate with a BSN before you're off the wait list at a CC. If you work at a hospital, they may pay all or most of your tuition.

    21-23: Earn your degree, whether at a CC or university. Both programs take about 2 years for the nursing component at most places. Graduate, study for the NCLEX, get your license, and get a job. Apply for ICU jobs, you may or may not be able to find one without a year of MS first. Depends on the economy, how you interview, what hospital experience you have, and where you live.

    23-25: Get ICU experience, 2 years is required by many CRNA schools anyway so good choice. You'll want to work in a fast-paced ICU with very sick patients, dealing with vents and multiple drips on a daily basis. If you don't start in one, transfer. You'll need BLS and ACLS just to work, and PALS before you apply. If you haven't already gotten a BSN, you'll need to take classes part time while you work. This may add a year to your ICU experience. You'll also need to take the GRE, and probably the CCRN. Look at requirements for CRNA programs you're interested in. You may need to take another chemistry course, or wish to try a graduate course in patho, statistics, or something else.

    26: Apply to CRNA schools. Get good recommendations, and hopefully get a few interviews.

    27: Start CRNA school

    29/30: Graduate and take your boards!
  6. by   sethmctenn
    great breakdown MB37!

    There was a guy in school who started as an adult with havng to get his GED. He was incredibly intelligent and did a great job. He was one of the stand outs in our class. Go for it!
  7. by   NewTexasRN
    The person who was detailed about how to reach that goal is absolutely right. You can do it. Just don't stop dreaming. When you feel discouraged come on here ask for our support and we will support you!!!! Good luck.
  8. by   tewdles
    I hired a registered nurse to work in the Peds ICU, back in the day. She was bright, a hard worker, and a good addition to the team. She was also a high school drop out that decided to move forward and get her GED and then a nursing degree. The world is your apple, take a bite!
  9. by   tschleif
    wow! good for you! We all make mistakes when we are young. You can do it! Best of luck!
  10. by   sunnycalifRN
    A very realistic timeline posted by MB37. However, Reminisce, do not be discouraged . . . as I told my son, who wanted to be an RN also (but without the pre-reqs at the time), the years are going to pass, no matter what, so you might as well be working toward your goal, rather than wondering whether you could have done it.

    p.s. - he got his RN, ICU experience and now is a flight RN on a helicopter!! So, it can be done.
    Last edit by sunnycalifRN on Nov 21, '09 : Reason: mistake
  11. by   Schmoo1022
    You can do it! I know many nurses that dropped out of high school for all sorts of reasons. It won't be easy, but you can do it. (it isn't easy for anyone!) Like the above poster stated..you are eventually going to turn 30 either way, why not be heading to where you want to be. My friends mother told her "How are you going to make it through nursing school when you can't even make it through highschool?" Well, my friend thrived in college..she took courses she was interested in and she turned into a fantastic student and nurse. Do not let anyone discourage you !
  12. by   Reminisce
    Quote from MB37
    Some of these steps may take less time than I'm giving you, but this would get you done by 30.

    Age 18: Study, take GED review class, take GED

    18-19: Enroll in community college, meet with advisor, discuss what is needed for pre-nursing at local CC and university offering BSN. As other poster suggested, consider taking a CNA course or preparing in some other way to get a hospital job and begin to be exposed to the profession.

    19-20: Take pre-nursing courses, seeking help from tutors, study groups, anything available on campus that you need to ensure good grades, since you are probably out of practice for studying. Consider whether or not you can afford to get a BSN immediately, or if you'll need to get your ADN first. Either way, take BSN prerequisites as well - you'll need them eventually.

    21: Apply to nursing programs, wherever you've decided you'd like to go. Try to keep your grades competitive (more As than Bs, avoid Cs and lower). If you are placed on a wait list (which many community colleges do), continue taking BSN prereqs and consider applying to the university program - you may graduate with a BSN before you're off the wait list at a CC. If you work at a hospital, they may pay all or most of your tuition.

    21-23: Earn your degree, whether at a CC or university. Both programs take about 2 years for the nursing component at most places. Graduate, study for the NCLEX, get your license, and get a job. Apply for ICU jobs, you may or may not be able to find one without a year of MS first. Depends on the economy, how you interview, what hospital experience you have, and where you live.

    23-25: Get ICU experience, 2 years is required by many CRNA schools anyway so good choice. You'll want to work in a fast-paced ICU with very sick patients, dealing with vents and multiple drips on a daily basis. If you don't start in one, transfer. You'll need BLS and ACLS just to work, and PALS before you apply. If you haven't already gotten a BSN, you'll need to take classes part time while you work. This may add a year to your ICU experience. You'll also need to take the GRE, and probably the CCRN. Look at requirements for CRNA programs you're interested in. You may need to take another chemistry course, or wish to try a graduate course in patho, statistics, or something else.

    26: Apply to CRNA schools. Get good recommendations, and hopefully get a few interviews.

    27: Start CRNA school

    29/30: Graduate and take your boards!


    Thank you very very very much mb37, This was exactly what I was looking for, I am going to do it and work hard for it, This looks like a good plan so I think I will follow each step, Now I have a place to always look back on to stay on task with this plan you have provided me with, I am very greatful, thanks
  13. by   Reminisce
    Thank you everyone for all your suport and encouragement, You are all so nice and I am very greatful, This is something I really really want and I know I can do it, Thanks everyone for your advice, I know it can be done now

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