help me buck the system, please! super-traditional pinning ceremony that nobody wants - page 4

Hi all- I'm posting this in the general discussion rather than the student discussion, as I want to hear from people who were successful in doing something like this. I'm the president of my... Read More

  1. by   Mystery5
    Quote from actioncat
    C'est la vie? (I assume that is what you meant). This is life?
    Oh my goodness! this post is so condescending. Nobody has an obligation to attend a pinning ceremony or commencement.
    Policies change ALL the time. Nothing is set in stone. Hey, that might be a good thing to remember in nursing. Just because something "has always been done this way" does not make it the best way to do something.
    She asked for advice and not admonishment to "go to your ceremony and not make a spectacle of yourself."
    And no, a state supported school should not be having a ceremony with strong religious overtones. There is absolutely no reason to have it in a church.
    Professionalism manifests itself in many ways. I, for instance believe that writing a coherent sentence is one way to show professionalism. To me, the ability to communicate through the written word is a more important marker of professionalism than wearing a cap and dress.
    I sincerely doubt the nursing shortage is due to the fact that nurses no longer wear caps. Just wondering, how much nursing experience do you have? Have you tried working on a busy floor wearing a white dress and cap?
    Dear Action,
    Since your birthday is August 1st, the same as mine, I will feel free to speak plainly to you, since we are almost twins.

    I read both of these posts and frankly, sister, your's is no less opinionated than the one you are critisizing. Plus, the syntax of your sentences is not superiour. It appears to me that you are reacting emotionally in response to the opinion of the previous poster.

    I sincerely hope the OP is mature enough to realize that her posting on an internet site her strong feelings about a matter that others might have heartfelt disagreements with, does invite them to also chime in their own strong opinions.

    Now, I suspect that the original poster's strong revulsion to wearing these caps might have something to do with being forced to wear them for clinicals. I can totally and unquivically sympathise with this sentiment. It sounds to me as if those running her program are utter control freaks. So, of course the whole class is probably totally fed up, except for the brownnosing teacher's pets. Because, ethically speaking, I think she is on firmer grounds with the religious issue. The legal precedent is very strong for that.

    My advise to her is to utter these four letters: ACLU. This might strike the fear of God into administration's hearts. Then, they can compromise on having the class vote on the dress code for the pinning.
  2. by   fab4fan
    Docs have a "white coat ceremony." Just in case some of you didn't know that; nursing isn't the only profession with its traditions.
  3. by   allamericangirl
    Quote from actioncat
    C'est la vie? (I assume that is waht you meant). This is life?
    Oh my goodness! this post is so condescending. Nobody has an obligation to attend a pinning ceremony or commencement.
    Policies change ALL the time. Nothing is set in stone. Hey, that might be a good thing to remember in nursing. Just because something "has always been done this way" does not make it right.
    She asked for advice and not admonishment to "go to your ceremony and not make a spectacle of yourself."
    And no, a state supported school should not be having a ceremony with strong religious overtones. There is absolutely no reason to have it in a church.
    Professionalism manifests itself in many ways. I, for instance believe that writing a coherent sentence is one way to show professionalism. To me, the ability to communicate through the written word is a more important marker of professionalism than wearing a cap and dress.
    I sincerely doubt the nursing shortage is due to the fact that nurses no longer wear caps.
    C'est la vie? (I assume that is waht you meant). This is life? ... Yes that is what I meant ..."Such is life!" I assume that you meant to type what instead of waht?

    Having a ceremony in a church does not mean that the cermony has religious undertones. I imagine if it is a small community college, they needed to find a place to have it, and they took what was available.

    If she is not obligated to go and doesn't like the tone of the ceremony, doesn't want to participate in tradition, doesn't want to have a pinning ceremony, why go unless it is to cause dissention?

    I don't believe that I made any reference to professionalism?

    My comment about the nursing shortage is only an observation and theory only, that I would be very interested in a study on.

    Evidently my sentences weren't so incoherent that you did get my gist.

    I find it hard to understand that a student chooses a school, completes the curriculum, and then starts rocking the boat at commencement.

    I am not entering the field of nursing to buck policy changes, or revise, refine, or re-define nursing or the medical industry. I am entering nursing to give care to the sick.

    I'm sorry you were so offended by an opinion other than yours. I am certain that there are other opinions that differ from both of ours.
  4. by   Mystery5
    Dear All American,
    Your post was fine. I think it's good to preserve traditions myself. If you go to Europe you'll find that they aren't as eagar as Americans to always change traditions. In UK the nurses still wear uniforms, although updated ones.

    The OP did say that the college has plenty of room for a ceremony. Really, you can't get away with this these days, they are leaving themselves pretty vulnerable on that one. It might be a local tradition, but probably will eventually be legally challanged.
  5. by   allamericangirl
    Grandmother did, Mother did, and two Aunts did. They NEVER complained and NEVER looked any less than PERFECT. No I haven't, but I would, and I could, and would be darn glad to do it, if it were required of me!
  6. by   allamericangirl
    Quote from Mystery5
    Dear All American,
    Your post was fine. I think it's good to preserve traditions myself. If you go to Europe you'll find that they aren't as eagar as Americans to always change traditions. In UK the nurses still wear uniforms, although updated ones.

    The OP did say that the college has plenty of room for a ceremony. Really, you can't get away with this these days, they are leaving themselves pretty vulnerable on that one. It might be a local tradition, but probably will eventually be legally challanged.
    I agree that the location of the ceremony is controversial, to say the least, because of separation of church and state issues. Schools in my state are no longer allowed to rent their auditoriums out for church services.

    I will probably be buying UK uniforms, and find a compromise between a dress and a steady diet of scrubs!
  7. by   begalli
    Hmm. This is very interesting. First, I'm surprised that it seems most pinning ceremonies that have been talked about here are part of the commencement or graduation itself from the school? Unless the school one attends is strictly a nursing school and doesn't graduate people of other disciplines, this might make sense, but isn't a pinning ceremony for the recognition or representation of the student nurse's right of passage into the practice role of nursing?

    What the heck does that have to do with the school? It was the student's hard work and dedication to their nursing program that got them to the point of being eligible to gain their license and practice their profession. Unless the instructors or school officials are going to go out sit for the NCLEX, do the work and earn a paycheck in the name of the student, then I don't think they should have any say in what the pinning ceremony is going to be like.

    I think our ceremony was a great combination of respecting our nursing roots while recognizing the changes that nurses have gone through over the decades by allowing us the autonomy of recognizing our accomplishments. What's the resistance? There's nothing wrong with updating a tradition. For goodness sake, at the holidays, I'm not going to go churn my own butter or go milk the cow to bake the cookies that have been a tradition in my family for a hundred years (so they say )!

    And just for the record, I think having this ceremony in a church in this day and age as nursing schools claim to teach cultural diversity is quite questionable and a bit hypocritical.
    Last edit by begalli on Jan 15, '05
  8. by   actioncat
    [QUOTE=Mystery5]Dear All American,
    Your post was fine. I think it's good to preserve traditions myself. If you go to Europe you'll find that they aren't as eagar as Americans to always change traditions. In UK the nurses still wear uniforms, although updated ones.


    Hello. Yes, I did respond emotionally, and I do believe my post was opinionated, but you are not the final authority on whether a post is "fine."
    I do have a problem with someone telling someone to "not make a spectacle of yourself." I just found that so... rude.
    Last edit by actioncat on Jan 15, '05
  9. by   VickyRN
    friendly moderator reminder:

    we're all entitled to our feelings. posters should be courteous. while disagreement in a debate is expected, personal attacks are not allowed.

    thanks for your understanding.
    vickyrn
    Last edit by VickyRN on Jan 15, '05
  10. by   Simkah
    At our last pinning ceremony, one of our graduating students wore a white mini dress, no slip, with an orange thong showing brightly through! Give me a little tradition anyday.
  11. by   Mystery5
    [QUOTE=actioncat]
    Quote from Mystery5


    Hello. Yes, I did respond emotionally, and I do believe my post was opinionated, but you are not the final authority on whether a post is "fine."
    I do have a problem with someone telling someone to "not make a spectacle of yourself." I just found that so... rude.
    Dear Action,
    Did I ever claim to be a final authority? I don't believe I did. I merely found American's post every bit as acceptable as your own. In her opinion, it is unseemly to make a big deal of the attire to be worn at the pinning. She's certainly entitled to have an opinion on that. You find it rude, eh???

    It IS a good practise to avoid making rash judgements based on a few posted words on the internet, wouldn't you agree??? It's funny how we can get over over something like this. You should have seen the falling out my class had over the pictures. It was utterly out of proportion, but I think we were all at the end of our rope, with our lives at the mercy of our instructors for 2 years in the program! I swear, I almost had a nervous breakdown!

    I think the OP will look back on all this and wonder why it seemed so important at the time. Really, I could've skipped the whole pinning. I ended up losing my pin a few years ago, I don't know where those pictures are stashed, and who knows where that precious cap is? Certainly not me. My kids will find it in the storage after I die, I think...
  12. by   rach_nc_03
    As far as the school dictating what the graduation ceremony will be, my feelings are these: You choose the school which you attend. You exchange money for your education, but not the right run the school, set it's policies, or dictate how, when, or where it should conduct it's commencement exercises. You agreed to follow their policy and procedure when you accepted their program.

    I believe that when you have completed your educational at an institution, you should live up to the rest of your obligation. You had ample opportunity to find out what their policies were. Go to your graduation exercises and have the dignity and decorum to not make a spectacle of yourself. You and your classmates made your school choice, no one forced you to go to school there. Finish what you started without causing trouble. Yes, it's your education and your graduation, but without the school, you wouldn't have either one. Life is filled with situations in which we have to do things that we don't like, and no employer is going to allow you to dictate policy to them and retain you as an employee. Se la Vie![/QUOTE
    if you read my original post and earlier reply to the thread, the school is a state-funded institution, and holding the ceremony in a church, with overtly religious overtones, violates the separation of church and state, as far as I understand it.

    also, my class raised the money to pay for the *entire* ceremony for last year's class, and this year's juniors will pay for ours. the school doesn't put one cent into it. and, frankly, that school exists because of taxpayer dollars, which I contribute to, and have for many years.

    this is *not* the school's commencement program. this is the nursing program's own ceremony, and we're told time and again that it is *our* ceremony, not the school's, and not the faculty's. I intend to approach this in a completely professional manner, as I have done everything else in nursing school, and in the careers I pursued before this one. As the leader of my class, I think it is my duty to speak for them on an issue they feel strongly about. as an individual of integrity, I feel it is important to behave in a way that supports my beliefs and ethical code. that is precisely how i intend to behave working as a nurse- by protecting the rights and care of my patients, even if it means fighting to change policies that do them harm. I won't 'go along to get along' on an issue I believe is important. also, if I choose not to attend the private pinning ceremony for my nursing class, this does not 'create a spectacle'. it makes a point, something I'm willing to do, and have *been* doing my whole life. (for the record, I've been able to change a large corporation's policies by pursuing change of things that didn't work- and not only did i *not* get fired for it- I got promoted.)

    people who are willing to stand up and make a point are the ones who affect change...something that has been crucial to nursing throughout it's history.

    and please, remember- my post was NOT intended to start a flame-war about tradition, religion, or anything of the sort. I wanted suggestions on how to approach our faculty about an issue the class agrees is a problem.

    the bottom line for me is that addressing the class members' concerns with faculty is part of my duty as a class officer. standing by my convictions is part of my duty as an ethical human being.
  13. by   hypnotic_nurse
    I enjoyed my pinning ceremony -- that's what I did instead of graduation, since I'd already done a couple of those and had no desire to do it again. It was a lovely closure to the nursing program, and I'm glad after all we went through together, that we could do it.

    My class was close, we mostly liked or at least respected each other. Sounds like OP's class is somewhat the same...and they should have something they like, especiallly since the school isn't paying for it.

    I can understand that if the OP's class had to wear caps for clinicals and hated them then why have to wear them for pinning, tradition or no?

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