help me buck the system, please! super-traditional pinning ceremony that nobody wants - page 14

Hi all- I'm posting this in the general discussion rather than the student discussion, as I want to hear from people who were successful in doing something like this. I'm the president of my... Read More

  1. by   HappyNurse2005
    I believe you should submit to the traditional conservative request for your graduation uniform BECAUSE this is not about you.
    oh really? if a graduation isn't about the students, then who is it about?

    If you look like a hip and regular gal/guy and expect that you will be noted as special by the patient and health team your are mistaken.
    granted, i've only been a patient in the hospital the two times i've had babies,but being a nursing student, i've seen many many nurses. And you know, i've had some very special nurses. My thinking they were special didn't have a thing to do with what they were wearing. It is the nurse's attitude, skill, caring, etc that makes a nurse special to a patient, not what they are wearing. As long as their scrubs match and are not obviously filthy/smelly, their uniform has never affected how I think of them.

    We are fighting for higher salaries, more control of your time, more time with patients, more opportunities to grow. If it is more important to you to look cute,then you choose for all of us, the dumbing down that the buyers of our skills and attitudes want
    I didn't realize that looking cute and all those other things were mutually exclusive. A nurse may want to look cute, but we all know thats not the most important thing. And why wouldn't one want to look nice?
  2. by   Mystery5
    Well, speaking of submission and humility, I happen to think they are very good spiritual qualities to develop. I'm reading St Thersa of Avila now and the three tenets that she emphasised in her teachings were Love, Detachment, and Humility. She was, BTW, way ahead of her time, quite an strong willed woman, having started a new order within the Catholic Church. She wrote several books which are quite profound.

    But, nevertheless, I still like the idea of a cap burning ceremony. Jesus was quite a counter culture guy after all, talking to the Samaritan woman at the well (A big cultural no no in that patriarchal, ethnocentric society), bucking the pharisees, and generally setting people straight on lots of things. But, in the end he definately was humble. So, as usual I'm on the fence. And, that program director sounds like a real pr**ck who needs a little visit from the ACLU.
  3. by   saltydad
    I note that the Consultant failed to respond to the portion of the OP's note regarding the Christian overtones of the ceremony. Does her suggestion to "submit" to the "conservative message" the Program Director is trying to give include submitting to this too? I would be quite interested to hear her response on this point.
    Howard
  4. by   macspuds
    To Whom it may concern:
    It is so sad that folks are so tied up with being Ploiticaly correct that they loose sight of what being a nurse really means.
    You are right in some respects: we need to keep up with the improvemernts in dress, but as to the other traditions, they are for your respect of your Profession and history of Nursing in general.
    I should hope that there are some potential Graduates that hold to the fact that Spiritualism has a place in Nursing. What about the patient that asks if you will pray with him or her? would you turn down a dying request?
    Hospice Nursing is all about spirituality and comfort in your nursing of these patients.
    I should hope that our profession has not turned it's back on the basics that make up our profession. Among these are Hope and Charity, which is the greatest?
    I should hope that "Breaking the system" has not become the Most important aspect in your graduation and future practice.
    Frankly, I have seen enough of the book and desk Nurses. The real aspect of nursing encompases a great deal more that that.
    I should hope that you revisit your Heart, dear rachel and find a little love there. I fail to see a warm person in what you say. If you sincerely believe all that you say, I feel sadness in my heart for you.
    macspuds
    Last edit by Nurse Ratched on Jan 24, '05
  5. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from macspuds
    To Whom it may concern:
    It is so sad that folks are so tied up with being Ploiticaly correct that they loose sight of what being a nurse really means.
    You are right in some respects: we need to keep up with the improvemernts in dress, but as to the other traditions, they are for your respect of your Profession and history of Nursing in general.
    I should hope that there are some potential Graduates that hold to the fact that Spiritualism has a place in Nursing. What about the patient that asks if you will pray with him or her? would you turn down a dying request?
    Hospice Nursing is all about spirituality and comfort in your nursing of these patients.
    I should hope that our profession has not turned it's back on the basics that make up our profession. Among these are Hope and Charity, which is the greatest?
    I should hope that "Breaking the system" has not become the Most important aspect in your graduation and future practice.
    Frankly, I have seen enough of the book and desk Nurses. The real aspect of nursing encompases a great deal more that that.
    I should hope that you revisit your Heart, dear rachel and find a little love there. I fail to see a warm person in what you say. If you sincerely believe all that you say, I feel sadness in my heart for you.
    macspuds
    In this country, we have the right to decide *if* spirituality is a factor in our daily lives and practice or not---and what form it takes, is also a choice. Having a ceremony with ANY religious undertones is inappropriate unless it is a private religious institution. In that case, a person would know what to expect, enrolling in such a college/university.

    Since the auditorium IS available, it only makes sense that venue is used, NOT the church. And the director of this program is acting in an intolerant and overbearing way, to say the least. Illegal, to say the MOST--- possibly.

    The "real aspect" of nursing encompasses what we hold dear, to many of us. And Christianity either does or does not have its place, based on individual beliefs. I know some VERY excellent nurses who are NON-Christian and non-religious. Not everyone needs to be religious to practice excellent nursing. It's not a ministry to EVERYone.

    Finally, I am sorry you feel sadness. I feel pride that someone is taking a stand here. This someone is a new nurse, who also has a solid belief system and is standing up for what a majority of class believes is wrong. Good for her! Good for us!
  6. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from Mystery5
    Well, speaking of submission and humility, I happen to think they are very good spiritual qualities to develop. I'm reading St Thersa of Avila now and the three tenets that she emphasised in her teachings were Love, Detachment, and Humility. She was, BTW, way ahead of her time, quite an strong willed woman, having started a new order within the Catholic Church. She wrote several books which are quite profound.

    But, nevertheless, I still like the idea of a cap burning ceremony. Jesus was quite a counter culture guy after all, talking to the Samaritan woman at the well (A big cultural no no in that patriarchal, ethnocentric society), bucking the pharisees, and generally setting people straight on lots of things. But, in the end he definately was humble. So, as usual I'm on the fence. And, that program director sounds like a real pr**ck who needs a little visit from the ACLU.
    Submission and humilty have their place, but not here. And I would hardly call cap burning either! Mixed message is what I am getting here.
  7. by   Mystery5
    I beg to differ, I believe that humilty is always in order.
  8. by   actioncat
    [QUOTE=
    I should hope that you revisit your Heart, dear rachel and find a little love there. I fail to see a warm person in what you say. If you sincerely believe all that you say, I feel sadness in my heart for you.
    macspuds[/QUOTE]

    That is your perpective, but I fail to see a warm person in your flowery post. More like Tsk, tsk, so perhaps you should examine your heart.

    Frankly, all sorts of professions have changed dress over the ages. it is about what is most practical. There are many ways to honor nursing. I do not believe wearing a cap is one of them.
  9. by   Mystery5
    Quote from actioncat
    That is your perpective, but I fail to see a warm person in your flowery post. More like Tsk, tsk, so perhaps you should examine your heart.
    LOL, he he..

    Yes, yes dear darling rachel, have you looked deep into the dark recesses of your rebellious heart and seen the lack of love, dear one???:chuckle (I say this only out of true agape love, my dear. Because of my extreme humilty, and nearness to our Lord, I can see the faults in others perfectly...)
  10. by   kesneysmom
    Quote from macspuds
    To Whom it may concern:
    It is so sad that folks are so tied up with being Ploiticaly correct that they loose sight of what being a nurse really means.
    You are right in some respects: we need to keep up with the improvemernts in dress, but as to the other traditions, they are for your respect of your Profession and history of Nursing in general.
    I should hope that there are some potential Graduates that hold to the fact that Spiritualism has a place in Nursing. What about the patient that asks if you will pray with him or her? would you turn down a dying request?
    Hospice Nursing is all about spirituality and comfort in your nursing of these patients.
    I should hope that our profession has not turned it's back on the basics that make up our profession. Among these are Hope and Charity, which is the greatest?
    I should hope that "Breaking the system" has not become the Most important aspect in your graduation and future practice.
    Frankly, I have seen enough of the book and desk Nurses. The real aspect of nursing encompases a great deal more that that.
    I should hope that you revisit your Heart, dear rachel and find a little love there. I fail to see a warm person in what you say. If you sincerely believe all that you say, I feel sadness in my heart for you.
    macspuds
    I agree with your post. I am leaving it at that. JMO
  11. by   Rita Marie
    Quote from rach_nc_03
    Hi all-

    I'm the president of my ADN class, graduating this May. We have 17 students, 14 of them women. Our faculty is, almost entirely, *extremely* conservative, and the school is in a very small town. Our pinning ceremony is held in a church, and has pretty significant christian religious overtones, which I have a problem with; I think it's an inappropriate blurring of the line between church and state (this is a state-funded community college), and I've had a few students express discomfort with having the ceremony in this church. By the way- it's only held there for faculty preference; there's plenty of room on campus.

    My main concern, though, is the attire for the ceremony. We're being forced to wear white dresses and caps. Now, we have to wear the caps in most clinical rotations, which is enough of an indignity (people think we're kidding, that other staff members are playing practical jokes on them by sending students in the room with caps on...it's nauseating, but I've tried to change this with no success). But I think it's ludicrous to insist we wear them at the pinning ceremony. It's *our* event, not the faculty's. In my opinion, the requirement that women wear dresses is inappropriately sexist, and from a logistical standpoint, *nobody* should be spending money on a white dress that will gather dust forever, when we have the expense of the NCLEX looming in our immediate future.

    We have one student who wants to wear a white dress, and the others are adamantly opposed to it. I'm looking for ways to approach the program director with alternatives...I think that I need to have some suggestions, or he's just going to shut it down completely. Personally, this issue is important enough to me that I won't attend the ceremony if we have to wear the dresses. I know of at least 2 other women who plan to do the same thing.

    My current plan is to have a meeting with the director and my vice-president to discuss the feelings our class has about the issue, and suggest a couple of alternatives- wearing nice, 'dressy' outfits, or wearing our clinical uniform (white smock and lab coat with navy pants). I'd like to hear from anyone else who had to address this issue, and how you resolved it. I'm also open to any suggestions *anyone* has...this director is extremely old-fashioned (he said he'd have us all wearing black stockings and orthopedic shoes, if he had his way), but he also respects me *specifically* because I'm confident and outspoken. By the way, if this were not the prevailing feeling of the other class members, I'd just skip the ceremony...I'm treating it like a class issue because I feel that's my role as the class president.
    Congradulations on your approaching launch into the "real world."

    First of all, the ceremony in the church building...getting upset about the church/state thing is so silly. It is a building. And if someone says a prayer--so what, there are prayers going on in every class room that you sit in when ever you have a test! Trust me!

    Second, at the pinning ceremony, try to consider going with the flow. It is one night, a few hours out of your life. For some it is a much bigger deal. In my class I have a mate who is from Nepal, another is from Cambodia. If they wanted us to wear white dresses, hats, stockings and all of that I would go along with it--for their sake if anything, because I respect them.

    Today it may not seem like a very important accomplishment, but years from now you will occassionally look at those photos and what you will see are your classmates and your won't really care that you were "made to get dressed up in whites."

    The idea of something dressy sounds very nice, I like that. And for our ceremony the plans are for dressy and probably a color sceme. Or the uniform for your clinicals sounds nice too. Cooperation helps make a work day go much better. It will make this go much better as well.

    Also, we are allowed to invite anyone up on stage to pin us during the ceremony--and I know that will be as special a day for my Mom or Mother-in-law, or my sister--who ever ends up doing this with me, as it will be for me. I want it to be a nice event, even if I don't agree with all of the plans that are going on. :hatparty:

    Rita
  12. by   saltydad
    Quote from Rita Marie
    Congradulations on your approaching launch into the "real world."

    First of all, the ceremony in the church building...getting upset about the church/state thing is so silly. It is a building. And if someone says a prayer--so what, there are prayers going on in every class room that you sit in when ever you have a test! Trust me!

    Second, at the pinning ceremony, try to consider going with the flow. It is one night, a few hours out of your life. For some it is a much bigger deal. In my class I have a mate who is from Nepal, another is from Cambodia. If they wanted us to wear white dresses, hats, stockings and all of that I would go along with it--for their sake if anything, because I respect them.

    Today it may not seem like a very important accomplishment, but years from now you will occassionally look at those photos and what you will see are your classmates and your won't really care that you were "made to get dressed up in whites."

    The idea of something dressy sounds very nice, I like that. And for our ceremony the plans are for dressy and probably a color sceme. Or the uniform for your clinicals sounds nice too. Cooperation helps make a work day go much better. It will make this go much better as well.

    Also, we are allowed to invite anyone up on stage to pin us during the ceremony--and I know that will be as special a day for my Mom or Mother-in-law, or my sister--who ever ends up doing this with me, as it will be for me. I want it to be a nice event, even if I don't agree with all of the plans that are going on. :hatparty:

    Rita
    First of all, no one is saying to deny a patient's spiritual needs. I would be happy to pray with a patient on request, respecting their desire but praying silently a prayer that I could use to acknowledge my beliefs. I also must say that I'm getting a little tired with other people telling me how I should just go along with another religion's ceremony; this is the height of intolerance. I would NEVER expect a non-sectarian (indeed, in this case, a governmental) school to have a Jewish-framed ceremony; this would be disrespectful of all those who are non-Jews. Or maybe the issue here is that Christianity is the religion of the majority, and therefore I should go along and not speak up because I may be the only non-Christian. If this is the case, then I think a reminder of the prohibition on governmental establishment of religion, any religion, would be in order. Rachel, please keep us informed of your progress.
    Howard
  13. by   StrbryJelo
    I was an LPN before going to RN school. As an LPN we had 3 different caps. The 1st was plain white and a burgandy ribbon was added when we reached a "senior" level of proficiency. Our graduation cap had 2 light blue ribbons. My pinning for LPN school was held in a church and my RN pinning was held in my college auditorium. For both we wore our student uniforms which were blue dresses (LPN) and white uniform pants suits (not scrubs) or dresses (RN). We wore dress clothes for LPN graduation and caps and gowns for college. We also received our Nightingale lamps and white bibles at pinning in both programs. Caps were pretty much on the way out when I was in RN school in 1981 and we had the option to wear them or not.
    I've worked in ICU for many years and for several of those I've been fortunate enough to be able to choose my own scrubs. Do I want to wear all white again? NO WAY! But did it hurt me to do it then or to wear white for pinning? NO WAY! I still have my pictures and we looked pretty good. Watch out as there a several facilities going back to nurses wearing all white. Large facitlities in large cities, not just small.
    Why does the idea of this being held in a church bother you so much and what are "pretty significant christian religious overtones"? The church your faculty wants to use...what is it like? Ours was held in a lovely church and the ambiance was much nicer than the pinning held in the school auditorium. The church added dignity and grace to the ceremony. Not because there was any specific religious service as part of my pinning, but because it was a beautiful building with lovely architecture.
    Some responders have stated there are many nurses practicing who don't hold a fundamental belief in GOD. I don't believe that. I believe in that old military adage that there are no atheists in a fox hole. You can't be an effective nurse if you don't have a basic belief in a higher order. Without this you can't survive over the long haul and you sure can't help your patients with their needs. Read all the latest. Docs are finally catching on to what those of us in the trenches have known for a long time, spirituallity affects your health and healing. You don't have to be a christian to paricipate in a pinning ceremony in a christian church any more than I have to be Greek Orthodox to enjoy a friend's wedding at her church or in a synagogue or temple. So if they say a prayer that doesn't fit your beliefs? Say a prayer you feel is suitable If you're an agnostic & don't pray, enjoy a moment of stillness and think about something that makes you happy.
    One person who responded gave a history of nursing dress that relates to nuns. I'm not familiar with that part of the history and am not doubting the writers accuracy. The point here being that it's still our current history. Because we've changed in our everyday work wordrobe, why do we need to change our history? What do you call those stupid caps and gowns for college graduations? Talk about out dated! I didn't hear any complaints about them and I don't know of any colleges that let you walk without wearing them.
    And push come to shove you can do what a coworker of mine used to do. She was always going to social functions that required evening attire which is pricey. She just hid the tags, taped the bottom of the shoes, wore the items and then returned them. Not a practice I care far as I've been in stores and found the stuff with perfume and makeup all over it. But, it's an opton
    Don't sweat the small stuff. In the long run that's what this is. Be proud of yourself for all the hard work you've done to get through your nursing program. And all the crap. All the programs are full of crap and busy work.
    Welcome to nursing. We can use all the help we can get. If you go to work at a place where the "nurses eat their young", run as fast as you can. There are MANY places out there where this is no longer done/allowed/tollerated.
    Mick

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