Help me

  1. Hi,

    I have a question. I'm really just looking for reassurance I guess. Today, while I was at work I accidently cut myself with the IV spike when I was re-spiking a bag of fluids. The patient had been hooked up to these fluids all day and they were running at 125cc/hr. The IV had stopped due to air in the line...so I unhooked the patient to prime the line and spiked a new bag of fluids and thus cut myself through my glove, I did bleed a little. A slight amount of blood was backed up in the IV line right where it connected to the patient but none no where near the spike. I asked a couple of nurses that I worked with but they said not to worry about it that I was ok. I probably would not give this a second thought except that the patient did have a history of IV drug use.....What do you all think?

    K
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   TazziRN
    You're fine. The spike is not in direct contact with the pt.
  4. by   miko014
    I wouldn't worry. What in the heck are your spikes made of??? I don't think I could cut myself with the ones we use if I tried! I'd be more worried about the pt, becasue technically there could have been a tiny bit of your blood in the tubing after you cut yourself...I doubt it, but there is more of a chance of that than the other way around. But I would report that and ask that they not use tubing with spikes made of razor blades.
  5. by   z's playa
    Yup...I second that thought of what your spikes are made of. :chuckle ....We couldnt cut butter with one if we tried......


    strange.


    Z
  6. by   z's playa
    Quote from miko014
    I wouldn't worry. What in the heck are your spikes made of??? I don't think I could cut myself with the ones we use if I tried! I'd be more worried about the pt, becasue technically there could have been a tiny bit of your blood in the tubing after you cut yourself...I doubt it, but there is more of a chance of that than the other way around. But I would report that and ask that they not use tubing with spikes made of razor blades.
    Razor blades......... ........too funny .


    Z
  7. by   BrwnEyedNurs
    Thank you all for your replies. I know when I think rationally that I am ok...but it still concerned me. I'm not exactly sure how I did it either. I didn't think the spikes on the end of our tubes were that sharp. I was having trouble getting the spike into the bag so I jabbed a little harder than usual and accidently hit my knuckle. I think it was the force more than the sharpness. Anyhow thanks for your replies....oh and I changed the tubing before I hooked the patient back up :wink2:

    K
  8. by   TazziRN
    The spike points are very much that sharp! I was spiking a bag once and wasn't careful....went right through the bag and right into my finger.
  9. by   Medic/Nurse
    I think you (or the patient) have zero risk from a "disease transmission" standpoint based on this incident.

    But, IV spikes are SHARP. As a rule, when discarding finished IV fluids/sets - I always remove (either cut or pull) the spike end from the tubing and toss it in the sharps - and then dispose of the remainder of the set in either the regular trash or biohazard based on any contamination/policy issues.

    I'm sure your accident will give others something to remember and be cautious of ... thanks for the reminder.

    Practice SAFE!
  10. by   TazziRN
    Quote from NREMT-P/RN
    But, IV spikes are SHARP. As a rule, when discarding finished IV fluids/sets - I always remove (either cut or pull) the spike end from the tubing and toss it in the sharps
    Hey, I like that! I think I'm going to start doing that.
  11. by   TiffyRN
    I actually cut myself with one when I was pulling it apart to discard it when I was still a student so I earned a respect for them then. I think we probably should put them in the sharps container, obviously I've had issues with them before.

    I think your risk of having been exposed to anything is not measurable.
  12. by   bethin
    Quote from NREMT-P/RN
    I think you (or the patient) have zero risk from a "disease transmission" standpoint based on this incident.

    But, IV spikes are SHARP. As a rule, when discarding finished IV fluids/sets - I always remove (either cut or pull) the spike end from the tubing and toss it in the sharps - and then dispose of the remainder of the set in either the regular trash or biohazard based on any contamination/policy issues.

    I'm sure your accident will give others something to remember and be cautious of ... thanks for the reminder.

    Practice SAFE!
    We also treat the spikes as sharps and should be disposed of in the sharps.

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