HELP! I DON"T WANT TO GO THROUGH CNA first... - page 8

This is really not to put any profession down but I've dreamed of being a nurse for soooo long, now only to discover that before entering my LVN program, I have to get the CNA title first! I am... Read More

  1. by   Foley1018
    working in the nursing home vs working in a hospital= in the hospital in our area the rn is responsible for everything for meds adl's charting and feeding, treatments etc. vs the nursing home Iwork in, I assits in others tasks like dressing, feeding all adls and tranfers. The rn does the treatments charting assesments meds and other things like that. My point I was trying to make was that you really should be a CNA so you can see these first hand,not just come off the street and olny be book smart, no offense to anyone....
  2. by   Aightball
    Being a CNA is a very rewarding thing! I've been a CNA for 9 years and have never looked back. If you can't get past the duties, perhaps you are not ready to be a nurse. The nurses in the hospital I work in do just as much "clean up" as the techs go.

    If you are indeed serious about nursing, get your CNA and work as a CNA for a while. At least a year. You'll be better prepared to be a nurse and will not have to struggle as much to understand the terminology or understand what your duties are.
  3. by   VA19
    I know that you may hate the idea of going thru CNA training first but you should if you want to be a nurse. I unfortunately did not and I found that things in Nursing School were much harder and more stressful for me than for those that had the CNA Training. The first semester in Nursing School when we all had 3 classes those with CNA training had more breathing room in Fundamentals of Nursing. As a RN I constantly have to be involved with CNA work and I don't see that changing anytime soon. In regards to speciality professions I also would like to be involved with Pediatrics but those are much sought after jobs and usually require a BSN or a BSN RN gets preference. Hope this helps.
  4. by   HisHands
    One of my rules of managing CNAs is: "I will never ask you to do something I wouldn't do myself." That includes bedpans, briefs and buckets (emesis). Another thing my nsg school taught us was our scope of practice. This includes all the requirements of a CNA plus the specialized functions that make us nurses. I don't think it's fair that a nurse can not help out an aide by doing vitals, or toileting patients if he/she has minute or two.

    Blessings.
  5. by   ayemlinda
    Hi there - times are changing. All of the hospitals in my area require "non-nurse applicants" to be CNAs and, almost without exception, the nursing schools locally have added that to their pre-reqs. I treasure my CNA and HHA training because it gave me hands-on experience that only reinforced my commitment to become an R.N. Currently I'm half-way through my LVN clinicals and work side-by-side with RNs, LVNs and CNAs. Nothing is "above" any of us. I will use the bridge program at the hospital to go on to my RN. In my experience, nothing could have better prepared me than the CNA training; it emphasized the commitment to patient care, and weeded out the people who weren't meant for the profession. One former classmate said, "I just want to become an RN; I don't want to touch poo"! My mom's an RN, my aunt was an RN, my sister-in-law is an RN and all of them, as an earlier posting wrote, "(would) never ask you to do something (they) wouldn't do.. ." The RNs with whom I work, as well as the LVNs continually contribute to patient care, up to their elbows. It's not glamorous, it's hard work, and there is nothing in the world that feels better than hearing a patient saying, "...I feel much better now..." after a treatment. Please think about the enlightened comments written above by people who can help you look at your situation in a much more positive light. Don't fight it, acccept this as a great learning experience and, before you know it, you'll embrace it as part of your nursing career. Best wishes and God bless you!
    Last edit by ayemlinda on Feb 6, '07 : Reason: spelling
  6. by   lookingforward
    Quote from TazziRN
    :yeahthat: :yeahthat: :yeahthat:

    It's one thing to not enjoy cleaning people up, I don't think anyone actually enjoys the "dirty" tasks. It's another, however, to blatanly complain that you don't want to be a CNA because you don't want to do the dirty tasks. For one thing, CNAs do much more than that , they are an indispensable part of the nursing team. For another, it ain't just the CNAs who do that. I agree that you need to re-read your original post carefully, maybe then you'll understand why you got the responses that you did.
    Well I never said I didn't understand why people commented as thay did. I just feel my honesty was misunderstood! It is possible to be an outstanding nurse without making LTC a living, fine if you find it rewarding, remember different strokes for different folks... it just doesn't seem like it's for me! Sure I will be a better nurse for it in the long run, but I cannot see myself having to change "briefs" ok, not diapers, all day long. I feel my best contribution as a nurse would be in another department. Thanks to all the responses, no matter how harsh. It has opened my eyes, but I'd still rather be in L&D or somewhere else... sorry for the BRUTAL honesty if it offended anyone!
  7. by   rktele
    If you are horrified at the thought of assisting an incontinent patient with skin care, you need to either deal with it, or rethink your career. I started out as a CNA and I wouldn't trade that experience for anything. As a RN, I wipe butts on a daily basis--what better way to assess my patient's skin? CNA skills are quite valuable, and you will be a better nurse for having them! I work in a hospital on a telemetry floor, not LTC. As for L&D, you will still be dealing with incontinence.
    Last edit by rktele on Feb 6, '07
  8. by   kimmymom
    I was in a nursing program that offered to take either the CNA class or a basic nursing skills class without becoming a CNA. I took the basic nursing skills class and wished I would have become a CNA beforehand. I am now a new RN and could've have used the experience. The tasks that the CNA's complete daily are invaluable, and yes, as a nurse I help to clean up patients as well:-) Good luck!
  9. by   LoveMyBugs
    Your school may want you to be a CNA first, so you know that you can handle the basic care. When I took CNA class at my community college, I spoke with the head of the nursing program and she told me that two weeks into the nursing program last year, they had 3 people drop out because they didnt relize that they would have to touch people. They wanted to do research and refused to clean poo, so they dropped out, they were unable to use the alternates because it was already two weeks in and the new students would be to far behind. This is a school that has only 40 spots a year with over 700 people applying, so this year being a CNA is required.

    Like you I thought that I wanted to go into L&D, but after working in LTC as a CNA, I think that I might want to go into hospice. Working as a CNA is more that just changing attends, your helping someone who is very uncomfortable feel just a little better, almost all my residents who are coherant are very thankful and will tell me that. While you might not think that LTC is for you, just by having the experiance as a CNA, you might change your mind as to what you really want to do, and you might discover that being a CNA is as bad as you think it is.
  10. by   SCRN1
    Quote from lookingforward
    Well I never said I didn't understand why people commented as thay did. I just feel my honesty was misunderstood! It is possible to be an outstanding nurse without making LTC a living, fine if you find it rewarding, remember different strokes for different folks... it just doesn't seem like it's for me! Sure I will be a better nurse for it in the long run, but I cannot see myself having to change "briefs" ok, not diapers, all day long. I feel my best contribution as a nurse would be in another department. Thanks to all the responses, no matter how harsh. It has opened my eyes, but I'd still rather be in L&D or somewhere else... sorry for the BRUTAL honesty if it offended anyone!
    Hun, what do you think many women in labor are doing as they are pushing? They are pooping and may not even know it! Guess who wipes that poop? The nurse!
  11. by   misty_maurie
    I agree with the posts saying that the experience is very important. I was a CNA for about 12 years before I went to nursing school and it helped sooo much!! There were so many people just out of high school that never worked as an aid and I got such a chuckle out of them cuz they didnt know how to place a bed pan for a patient.. or wrestled with the ted socks for 10 minutes! As a nurse you arent always going to have your aid handy and your job is to take care of your patient so when you do have to place a bed pan or wipe poo you can do it the right way! That would be sooo embarassing for you if you put the bed pan backwards (ive seen it happen). You work as a CNA while you are going through school...you will learn so much! I have also learned that what you think you want to do right now probably will change as you go on with your education. There were so many students just like you that wanted to do the baby thing but when they witnessed a stillbirth, and babies that arent healthy.. babies in drug withdrawal they totally changed their mind! Give yourself some time and take every opportunity there is to experience the things that will make you a better nurse.
  12. by   lookingforward
    i was looking around the other posts in other sections and i came across a post from dorselm that kind of went like this:
    i dislike...
    1. inappreciative pts who can pick up the phone, dial a number and talk but can't spread a packet of mustard on their sandwich. or who have you come in their room at 9 to bathe them and they tell you to come back later when they are ready.
    2. being short staffed and having to take on even more work
    3. co-workers who hang in clicks
    4. having to smell poop all day
    5 having to clean poop all day
    6. poop getting on me
    7 listening to phlegm in someones throat who has a trach
    lifting or transporting patients.
    8 not having team work

    i love.....
    working with some of the patients. they are so adorable and even though you can't always understand what you're saying, they are so sweet and appreciative of you helping them...
    ******so it seems like not everyone disagrees******
  13. by   lookingforward
    I guess some people just don't understand. Poopy is ok, as long as it's not 12 or so pts. all day, 7 days a week, as a career!

close