HELP! I DON"T WANT TO GO THROUGH CNA first... - page 4

This is really not to put any profession down but I've dreamed of being a nurse for soooo long, now only to discover that before entering my LVN program, I have to get the CNA title first! I am... Read More

  1. by   maureenlynn
    You know, I was scared to death on my first day of clinicals for the CNA class. I was worried that I would gag or crinkle my nose when changing a brief or something like that, but in all honesty, it's not as bad as you think. Instead of thinking of the poop-filled brief in room 205, think of the poor resident in room 205 who is lying in his/her own feces because he/she can't take very good care of his/herself anymore. Put yourself in his/her shoes. I personally would be horrified if someone had to come in and clean me in that way. And if that person gagged at that smell? Just go in there, get the job done with a smile and you both will feel so much better.
  2. by   midcom
    In my program, if you aren't already a CNA, sduring the first term you take a class that essentially trains you to be one, including a 6 week clinical doing CNA work. I completed that and am now in the 2nd term.

    I have discovered that the CNAs are so much more comfortable working with their residents in clinical and those of us who just completed the training are a bit tenative. Oh, by the way, this term's clinical is still in LTC but mostly doing LPN duties, INCLUDING changing diapers & wiping butts.

    If you really feel you cannot do CNA type duties, run, don't walk to a different profession. You won't make it through LPN training. One of the first things my instructors taught us was that as nurses we will be required to perform duties that those "under" us also do. RNs will do LPN work at times, LPNs will do CNA work. Heck, CNAs probably do housekeeping jobs too. Get used to it. If that resident's CNA is busy with another resident, are you going to leave another sitting in shi__? If you were in the hospital & wanted to get up to use the restroom NOW, do you want to wait for a busy CNA to come while your bladder feels like it's going to burst or would you hope a nurse would step in & help you? It happened to me afetr surgery. Not only did a nurse help me walk to the toilet but she wiped up the urine on the floor because it was too late & changed my gown.

    Dixie
  3. by   moongirl
    4th semester Rn student- seen lots o poo. and other various unmentionables.

    will it go away when I graduate? no.. because when I am in a room right now, I am precepting and am considered to BE the nurse.. who do you think is helping that CNA with the clean up? it aint the janitor.

    I think the fact that you have to go thru CNA classes is super idea. It will help you decide if this is the right career for you- which it def sounds like it is NOT. That way you wont waste the time going thru school to find out if you hate it.

    I agree with the other posters, I doubt you will find a OB job without an RN behind your name, and I know that in my area, hospitals dont hire LPNs anymore, most new grad LPNs here are hired for LTC.

    good luck with your decision!
  4. by   NurseCubanitaRN2b
    As a CNA I can tell you that there is NO SHAME in butt wiping...at least on our end....can you imagine the shame one feels who's having THEIR BUTT WIPED? I know this because some of them tell me how they feel so embarassed having me clean them up....I smile at them and tell them that they shouldn't feel like that because it's not their fault....and I also reassure them that they're fine and that I'm there to help them when they need me....

    Now, I worked with an LVN who stated that had it NOT been her being a CNA before entering nursing school there is NO WAY that she would have made it through...She said that being a CNA was soooooooo helpful because in LVN school she had to do the bathing and butt wiping.....and she had went to a tech school to get her LVN and having the CNA wasn't a requirement.....but she said that you can tell who had the experience and who didn't....and the ones that ended up dropping out DIDN'T have the experience as the CNA....Please don't make getting your CNA a bad thing, it will DEFINATELY help you in getting your LVN because in most states being an LVN/LPN requires you to bathe and butt wipe (in hospitals)....Good luck
  5. by   Cattitude
    Quote from lauralassie
    sorry some people are so mean to you on this thread. .
    i don't think they're being mean at all. it's being realistic. if they can't handle some words on a message board, how will they handle nursing school, let alone working as a nurse???
    i agree with the majority of posts here, the op really needs to rethink her profession choice before starting school. her words "horrified" at the thought of changing an older person's diaper? sounds like a really young person who thinks it's going to be all about johnson's baby powder and rubber duckies.:chuckle

  6. by   lauralassie
    Quote from casbeezgirlrn
    i don't think they're being mean at all. it's being realistic. if they can't handle some words on a message board, how will they handle nursing school, let alone working as a nurse???
    i agree with the majority of posts here, the op really needs to rethink her profession choice before starting school. her words "horrified" at the thought of changing an older person's diaper? sounds like a really young person who thinks it's going to be all about johnson's baby powder and rubber duckies.:chuckle

    you can't judge a person by a few sentences. to tell them we don't need them in this profession is mean no matter how you look at it. i would like to know more about them before i judge. oh....that's right nurses arn't supposed to judge. maybe this op has had a terrible experience with this sort of care in the past that makes them feel this way. as experinced nurses maybe we can help them overcome this. i think that is what this op is really asking for any way.
  7. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from lauralassie
    You can't judge a person by a few sentences. To tell them we don't need them in this profession is mean no matter how you look at it. I would like to know more about them before I judge. Oh....that's right nurses arn't supposed to judge. Maybe this op has had a terrible experience with this sort of care in the past that makes them feel this way. As experinced nurses maybe we can help them overcome this. I think that is what this op is really asking for any way.
    Looking at the title of this thread, then reading the OP about being 'horrified' at having to do some of the tasks described, i still don't feel any different. IF CNA tasks are 'horrifying', nursing tasks aren't going to be much less horrifying, and one shouldn't go into a profession with rose-colored glasses.
  8. by   wonderbee
    Nursing is much about poop and body fluids. We clean it, measure it, smell it, dispose of it, describe it, talk about it, collect it and write about it. RN, LPN, CNA... it doesn't matter. We're in the poop and whatever else comes out of a orrifice business. The only consolation I can offer to the OP is that you get used to it. But you'd better realize that nursing is a messy job.
  9. by   purplemania
    I see the benefit of being a CNA first. It would help you to solidify basic nursing practice and caring, really caring, for the patient. Hope you are not under the impression that being a nurse means you will not get your hands dirty.
  10. by   CrazyPremed
    To the OP,

    There is nothing wrong with not wanting to clean up crap all day long. I work in an ER where half of the nurses complain that they came to the ER to get away from all the CNA stuff. At times CNA work can seem gross and disgusting. Also, it can sometimes seem beneath a person.

    I remember cleaning a LTC patient for the third time and thinking, "I have a bachelor's degree, got accepted to a competitive Master's in Science program, have an incredible resume, GPA, and am finishing up the premed science requirements at the top of my class. All of my friends are in graduate engineering programs or medical school, preparing for competitive surgical residencies or $80,000+ jobs, and I'm stuck here." To pretend that this does not bother someone is a joke.

    What the CNA class does give is the understanding - from a pt's perspective - of why these tasks are important, and how they fit in to the care of a patient. By the end of my 3 month class my focus completely shifted. I developed a concern for a pt's dignity and respect, and enjoyed the process of getting to know a pt. Does this mean that I want to make a career of working in rehab or LTC, or now enjoy giving bed baths? HECK NO!!! But it did teach me to accept many of the so called negative aspects of nursing.

    The truth is, you will probably hate your CNA class, but you will be a better nurse for it (meaning that your life as an LPN may be somewhat easier because you will learn to perform the things you hate quickly). Don't worry. Most of the people in your class may feel the same way you do.

    Thanks for your honesty.

    CrazyPremed
  11. by   pjgarrett1388
    To the OP I honestly think the CNA class would be very beneficial to deciding whether or not you would like to enter nursing. I had the benefit of getting my CNA certification while in high school and can honestly say I am glad I did! When I did my first clinical I was scared to death, but as I got to know my residents I was able to see how much I was helping them. They do feel embarrassed about not being able to do some of their ADL anymore, but they are so grateful to have someone their to help them. I know that I want to be a nurse and I know that it is not an easy job, but it is very rewarding to get to see a smile on a resident's face or see someone laugh who hasn't laughed in a long time! We had a classmate in my CNA class who was scared to touch residents; he didn't want to handle them so we ended helping take care of his residents too. Needless to say he didn't pass the class! I cannot imagine getting into Nursing School and finding someone who will not touch the residents or patients! I hope you are able to figure out if this what you want to do or not, but I think the CNA class could be very beneficial to you!
  12. by   Batman24
    One of the RN schools I applied to requires I get a CNA certificate before beginning nursing classes. If I get into the other school and time allows for it I might try and get my CNA before starting that school as well. It would only serve to help me in the end.

    I don't think anyone really relishes the idea of having to change diapers, but I don't think that even remotely compares to those adults that need to wear them. I hope that when I become a nurse I make these people feel as comfortable as possible.
  13. by   PralineLPN
    All I can say, is that being a CNA/GNA (geriatric NA) was horrible and a hard, no-thanks, low paying, crappy (literally) job. But it payed off in dividends while in school. Also, as a LPN, I am easily able to transfer pts, and I learned a lot about talking to folks as a CNA. At school the non-cna's had an obviously harder time than the cna's with at least a few months experience. Just do it for a couple of months, you'll be glad you did. It also made me appreciate my cna's and treat them right. And furthermore, I think being a LPN will definately ease my transition to BSN/MS degrees. What with knowing procedures, sterile technique, Dx, meds etc.
    Paul

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