HELP! I DON"T WANT TO GO THROUGH CNA first... - page 17

This is really not to put any profession down but I've dreamed of being a nurse for soooo long, now only to discover that before entering my LVN program, I have to get the CNA title first! I am... Read More

  1. by   Always Smiling
    I had 2 masters degrees when I decided to make the switch to nursing. I have now been a CNA in a skilled nursing home for a couple of years while going through nursing school. I'm the first one in that room when a patient's been incontinent. My nose isn't stuck up so high in the air that I can't see how uncomfortable (not to mention the skin breakdown issues) the patient is after having a BM all over themselves.
    Last edit by Tweety on Feb 24, '07 : Reason: edited
  2. by   ERNurse752
    I remember when I was still a student on ICU...we had a patient we had just cleaned up, changed the whole bed, etc. He started pooping again, before we rolled him back over. I didn't want to change the bed again, so I just caught the poo right in my (gloved) hands. Hehe.

    (And, no, I don't really like poo either. But...it happens.)
  3. by   tgb3rn
    Quote from lookingforward
    This is really not to put any profession down but I've dreamed of being a nurse for soooo long, now only to discover that before entering my LVN program, I have to get the CNA title first! I am horrified of having to do some of the tasks described! This is not whaat I dreamed of all these years, I was thinking more along the lines of changing newborn diapers, not old folk diapers! CAN ANYONE BRING ANY CONSOLATION?
    It has been said here already, and others will and do disagree---but get out NOW.

    I am a man and it was VERY hard for me to get over some of the things you are worried about but had to and did. CNA, LPN, now RN. I think ALL nurses should be a CNA first.
    Just my opinion.
    Tom
  4. by   PHLEBOTOMIST_TO_RN
    I started out as a Phlebotomist, and I promise you I will be far and away more knowledgeable when nursing school starts then those who have ZERO experience working in a hospital setting. Never think CNA,Lab,etc is below you as its a great foundation.
  5. by   Tweety
    Please note that I removed a post that was intended to be private, because it spurred some heated response and personal attacks.

    Remember when someone gives an opinion, they are entitled without being told "that's so offensive, I don't want you as my nurse", etc. etc.

    Note that we've been there and done that already, and no need to start anew with a new poster.

    Just disagree politely, or hold your tongue and ignore the thread no matter how offended you are. Take a deep breath and pause before you post. Thanks so much for understanding and keeping it friendly

    Thanks so much. Carry on.
  6. by   JennMcK
    When I did my CNA training here in San Diego, I loved it. At first I was a little squeamish about changing residents diapers and giving them showers (during my clinicals). However I got over that real quick, I also felt happy that I was helping them. I mean, what if it was my grandparent in there? What about when I get old and they are uncomfortable about helping me? They're just as human as I am. My CNA teacher (who worked for 30 years as an RN) said, "If you feel uncomfortable about washing the private parts of a man or a woman, then you might not want to be a CNA or a RN. There will be many things that you might not feel comfortable with, but you still need to learn them." She was the best teacher, and she was so funny too.
  7. by   Lovely_RN
    It's not just old folks who end up incontinient. Code browns happen amongst all age groups in the hospital. You can't even rely on going straight to a Peds or NICU setting to escape adult poop, what if you get floated?

    What about bed pans? You could be dealing with a teenager who is bed ridden and needs the bed pan. What will you do leave the person squirming while you run around to find a CNA?

    You may not have to do the diaper or bedpan thing a lot as an RN but if you think that you will always be able to wait on the CNA to take care of this unpleasant task you are mistaken.

    If you are going to be a nurse expect to confront some non-baby (I have a 6month and baby poop stinks too) poop at some point in your career.

    It's really not as bad as you are making it out to be in your mind. I thought I could never do it but I did and have lived to tell the tale many times. Some poops were smellier than others but you get over it eventually.
  8. by   AR_RN
    I know this subject has been well covered, but as it's still ongoing, I thought I'd add my 2 cents.

    I've been reading Allnurses for a long time now and my journey is finally moving forward. I became a CNA about 6 months ago to give me a foundation in the nursing field while I finished up my prereqs and hopefully start nursing school in the fall. I didn't have to, but I had never worked in the medical field before and didn't really know what to expect. I don't doubt that one can be a great nurse without being a CNA, but I wouldn't have passed up the step for anything. I was scared of it at first, but in the past 6 months, I've been peed on, pooped on, vomited on, scratched, bitten, slapped, spit at, cussed, kissed, hugged, praised, thanked and more. I didn't think I could handle some of the body fluids, but rarely give it a second thought now. I still have a bit of trouble with trach "stuff", but am getting over that too. Had my first experience with C-diff this week. Whee. I have even discovered that I don't freak out when I walk into a room to find that a resident has passed away. So no, it's not a glamorous job, and I know I want to move on up the ladder to become a nurse rather than being a career CNA, but I've learned some very valuable skills and even more, I've learned something very important about myself. I can do this, and I will be a good nurse who can take the "yucky stuff" in stride. And I like to think that I will never see myself as above any task required of me as a nurse. Sometimes doing something you think you'll hate, or something you're scared of, you learn something that makes you a better person in the long run. Doesn't mean you have to keep doing it for life, but it can still be worthwhile.
  9. by   RN BSN 2009
    Gotta start off in the trenches
  10. by   twotrees2
    Quote from lookingforward
    This is really not to put any profession down but I've dreamed of being a nurse for soooo long, now only to discover that before entering my LVN program, I have to get the CNA title first! I am horrified of having to do some of the tasks described! This is not whaat I dreamed of all these years, I was thinking more along the lines of changing newborn diapers, not old folk diapers! CAN ANYONE BRING ANY CONSOLATION?
    hmmm - id have to say reconsider what you wnat to do in life then - these tasks described are a part of nursing even if your "just the nurse" - just my opinion ( not to mention the only thing you "have " to do as a prereq is get the title - in my opinion NOONE shoudl be a nurse without having worked as a cna at least a yr so they can KNOW what its like and have good training in those tasks )
  11. by   Xentec
    Tho i cringe at the thought of explosive liquid BM, at the same time i want to laugh at myself cleaning it up simply because it is so gross.

    Is that a normal attitude? I know i used this attitude to get through hell on earth type work when i was at Honda, this is how my buddies an i got through the "literal" pain and anger this job was inflicting on us 60 hours per week.....when its so bad all you can do is just laugh at yourself(and the people that was breaking down from the hard work).

    Tho i gota say, i do fear that breaking in period, but i know i'll take it like a champ(on the outside lol)

    What is the breaking in period of smelling and touching #2? 2 weeks or so?

    And to the original poster, just ask yourself "how would i feel if that were me laying in my own BM?"
  12. by   mistydave
    :hatparty: I don't want to be a cna first. Most NS in our area require it, however I found one that didn't. They are a private school. They said something about it being absolutely required here if you enroll in the programs after July. However, my program starts in April, so I got to slide by. I am very thankful for this because it would be an additional $600 out of my pocket to get the STNA, and I would not be using it. I guess I have a different reason than the original poster. But I don't want to be a cna first either--
  13. by   twotrees2
    Quote from stevielynn
    You should consider changing schools. There are nursing schools that do not require you to be a CNA first. Or maybe you should go straight for your RN and bypass LVN, unless LVN is your goal.

    Regardless, you will have to deal with bodily fluids. The one I dislike most is phlegm. I have an LVN co-worker who gags at vomit - she works through it and takes care of the patient but has an involuntary gagging reflex.

    As to whether being a CNA first makes you a better nurse in regards to team work - I disagree with that.

    You learn all the CNA stuff the first few weeks of nursing school. And that is essentially what you do with patients AT FIRST on clinical.

    I have met many nurses who were CNA to LVN to RN who are NOT team players, who ignore call lights, who look for the CNA to do the distasteful jobs.

    What matters is each person's own personal integrity - and being a CNA first does not guarantee that. Some former CNA's are so grateful to not be a CNA anymore that they avoid all "CNA" things. It CAN be helpful for some people who want a head start. But for me, someone with NO medical background, it was fine that I did not do the CNA thing. I love my CNA's and we are a team.

    Since you don't want to do this, the only option you have is look for another school.

    Or decide you want to be a nurse and just do it.

    steph
    i digress from my last post - thinking about it yes you are right there are many who turn into a cna's worst nightmare of a nurse- i still believe that one should spend at least a yr as a cna then maybe the ones who go for nursing thinking it is glorified or nurses dont have to that stuff may not go on to school or at least hopefully will know what it feels like to work with a nurse who is unwilling to help and will not be one of them. fwiw - i am going to miss my cnas i been working with the last 2 yrs- ( i leave next week) we have had a great repor cause i always try to help and they know if i dont when they ask its cause i cant -

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