Help

  1. I have worked on a rehab unit (sci/tbi) for the past 3 years as a nurse assistant. I recently finished by ADN and passed my NCLEX. I have been thrown out into the world of nursing with little orientation. I need advice on how to deal with former NA co-workers who think I have changed. I also need advice on how to deal with RN co-workers who for some reason have turned against me (or atleast that is what it feels like). I do fairly well at completing my nursing care in a timely manner. I am not scared to ask questions when I am uncertain. What I need the most help with is how to deal with all of these co-workers. I love this unit, I have never wanted to change speciality from sci/tbi nursing but my co-workers are stressing me out to the max and making it difficult for me to enjoy my work. I am considering transfering to some other unit. Please send some advice my way. Thanks
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  2. 3 Comments

  3. by   Mijourney
    Hi RR,
    Congratulations on passing boards and becoming an RN. In what ways do your coworkers perceive that you have changed? Perhaps you are demonstrating more confidence in your abilities as a patient care practitioner? Perhaps its just the fact that you have pursued more education and are receiving more pay. You should not dismiss your coworkers feelings. Maybe you can discuss your discomfort about how you feel they are treating you since you have worked with them for a while. Let them know that although you have accomplished a worthy endeavor, you still need their friendship and support. Your dilemma is very common in nursing. Minimal or no support for those who desire to enhance themselves practice-wise or educationally. It's called eating our young. In the work setting, there are too many aides and nurses (one or two is too many) treating fellow coworkers like a virus. It's no wonder the field of nursing frequently falls short of its expectations and potentials. During a shortage, in particular, no matter how we feel about someone's achievements or their increased demonstation of confidence and knowledge, it is highly important we demonstrate support for one another at the bedside. Best wishes.
  4. by   JillR
    Mijourney, as always you message was very well thought out and right on target.

    I think that it can be very hard to go back to work for the same facility in another position. I too have had a few problems with the CNA's that I used to work with. Most of them were very suportive as I was attending school, but some were not. I had a conversation with one of the CNA's when I began school about how I didn't want to change and forget what it was like to be a CNA, as some of the RN's I had worked with at that time seemed to do. She told me that I would have no choice, I would change, because my level of resposibility would change and that I shouldn't feel guilty about it. She added however, that it was important to never forget where I came from. She is right and I try to rememeber this when I delegate a task to a CNA. I don't know if this will help, but i wish you good luck with this problem.
  5. by   oramar
    Originally posted by Mijourney:
    Hi RR,
    Congratulations on passing boards and becoming an RN. In what ways do your coworkers perceive that you have changed? Perhaps you are demonstrating more confidence in your abilities as a patient care practitioner? Perhaps its just the fact that you have pursued more education and are receiving more pay. You should not dismiss your coworkers feelings. Maybe you can discuss your discomfort about how you feel they are treating you since you have worked with them for a while. Let them know that although you have accomplished a worthy endeavor, you still need their friendship and support. Your dilemma is very common in nursing. Minimal or no support for those who desire to enhance themselves practice-wise or educationally. It's called eating our young. In the work setting, there are too many aides and nurses (one or two is too many) treating fellow coworkers like a virus. It's no wonder the field of nursing frequently falls short of its expectations and potentials. During a shortage, in particular, no matter how we feel about someone's achievements or their increased demonstation of confidence and knowledge, it is highly important we demonstrate support for one another at the bedside. Best wishes.
    Dear Mijourney: What a perfect answer you have given, that just about covers everything you could tell this new nurse. What a fine person you must be, I wonder if the people you work for and the patients you care for know how lucky they are?.


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