heartbroken needed to vent - page 4

after 6 weeks of training I resigned. My preceptor gave me hell. literally hell. Even my coworkers agree on that. I told my manager that I'm not clicking with my preceptor but she said stick with her coz she's the best. and so I... Read More

  1. 1
    [QUOTE=seekerskeeter;6743727]
    Quote from KateRN1
    *warning -- harsh words ahead*she said so can you still handle it.. it's different from so you still think you can handle it. I didn't present myself a know it all because if I don't know it I do ask her how to do it.. there are times where she will call me in front of my patient and ask me how to do this and that then if I don't know I would tell her I was meaning to ask you about this topic before we get inside the patient's room because I dont know how to do this.. she wouldnt answer me ofcourse I look dumb in front of my pt but I think she finds joy in that, making me look dumb and incompetent in front of people. so during my break while eating I research online how to do stuff then the next time she asked me I was able to answer although she was never satisfied. she never made a comment that I ever did anything right. All she did was crush my confidence.
    My preceptor was exactly this way. She never ever gave me one work of positive feedback. On top of that she was always scowling, in fact, it seemed like she was unhappy doing her job. She was compassionate to some of the patients and would give bed baths to the sickest ones. I just did not understand how that compassion could not be extended to me as another human being deserving of basic respect. My preceptor even made comments that could be seen as racist (or racial prejudice toward the race category I fall into). It was just so awkward working with her. I hated every day I went to that unit. I would feel like I was going to vomit on the car ride over to the hospital. I am just so glad I never have to go back there. I don't think I would be able to work with someone like that agian, unless I had a face to face conversation about how their attitude was effecting me and changing their behavior.
    iamgabrielle likes this.

    Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  2. 2
    It is never okay for a preceptor to degrade an orientee in front of a patient. It makes the nurse and the hospital look bad.
    iamgabrielle and Hygiene Queen like this.
  3. 1
    Unfortunately, wherever you go you will have doctors/preceptors/coworkers/bosses/family members/patients who are rude, mean and treat you like crap. The best thing to do is not take it personal and just do your job. If it's a preceptor that's giving you a hard time, try your best to get through orientation. Once you're on your own, it will be much better and you don't even have to go to them for help. If it's certain coworkers you dislike, bond with the ones you do and schedule yourself so that you're working opposite days as the people you don't like. You can't change jobs every time you don't like your coworkers or change your assignment b/c you don't like a patient. Learn to work with people, especially the difficult ones, and you will go a long way. Goodluck on your job search.
    iamgabrielle likes this.
  4. 0
    i had to quit coz of my preceptor.. we're on the same boat ride.. she made my orientation a living hell.. never learned a thing from her.. she made me so anxious i felt like vomiting all the time.. my brain couldn't function with her. i was so scared to go to work.. there were times that i will have an opportunity to work with a different nurse coz she was on break and i would do just fine.. i was able to do my job without the feeling of my chest about to explode.. but once she returns I'm back to being a total wreck. for short she ruined me. i tried to switch preceptors but manager wouldn't do it. so the situation got so bad.. had to go.. tsk. sad
  5. 2
    Quote from zookeeper3
    the hard truth is that you will come across people like this your entire career and you just can't keep quitting!!!! i have told my kids and all those i have precepted for 17 years, that you don't have to like the person educating them, as long as they are competent and you can learn from them. this is precious advice.

    i learned skills from hard nosed nasty nurses, i learned how to interact with the caring ones. i learned how to stand toe to toe with a screaming doctor from those nasty nurses. i learned how to drop everything and hold a hand and just listen from the caring ones.

    each peer you encounter in your career has the potential to teach you something each and every shift. you can't run from the hard ones, but you can figure out what you need from them and what they need from you. ex. the hard a$$ nurse gets assigned the difficult needy on the call buzzer patient. i offer to take that one from them, and tell them i need the patient experience. the trade off is that my lab draw skills stink and i want her to help me improve my skills with the morning lab draws.

    this is about knowing how to work and work with people. it is a skill to be learned that will serve you well as you slowly become proficient in dealing with a wide breth of patients. it starts with our peers, please don't let anyone drive you out of a job, unless you are going to be fired, there is always wiggle room to work out a compromise.

    may i finally suggest, in the future, you immediately pull this nurse away in private and discuss how you prefer these situations be handled. it sure as heck is uncomfortable, but i've been pulled in for doing a few of the things you mentioned and quickly adjusted my precepting verbage and actions...

    ... we all learn from each other, you need to put in the difficult actions by stating what you need, like and dislike. i wish you well.
    this.

    i had an instructor that used to make me physically ill because she was so difficult. i took her aside, and when i told her how i felt, she looked startled and said she hadn't meant to come across that way.

    sure, she still made me know my stuff and still grilled me, but her attitude changed dramatically.

    i could have dropped out of school because of her, but i made myself toughen up and learn from the experience. not every preceptor is going to be warm and fluffy, but they still have much they can teach you. what will you do when you get another job and your preceptor is tough on you? what about a code when everyone is yelling and get short with you?

    ultimately, you're being taught how to save people's lives. take this and learn from it in your next position.
    Ruby Vee and seekerskeeter like this.
  6. 1
    [quote=amzyrn;6745153]
    Quote from seekerskeeter

    my preceptor was exactly this way. she never ever gave me one work of positive feedback. on top of that she was always scowling, in fact, it seemed like she was unhappy doing her job. she was compassionate to some of the patients and would give bed baths to the sickest ones. i just did not understand how that compassion could not be extended to me as another human being deserving of basic respect. my preceptor even made comments that could be seen as racist (or racial prejudice toward the race category i fall into). it was just so awkward working with her. i hated every day i went to that unit. i would feel like i was going to vomit on the car ride over to the hospital. i am just so glad i never have to go back there. i don't think i would be able to work with someone like that agian, unless i had a face to face conversation about how their attitude was effecting me and changing their behavior.
    sheesh. no wonder people don't want to precept. when preceptors start being judged based on their facial expression, something is awry. maybe she had a fight with her husband before she came into work. maybe she just got her butt chewed by the manager for something. maybe a patient just yelled at her. maybe she realized she has spinach between her teeth. maybe she's scowling because she's having problems seeing and needs glasses.

    i'm not saying this to be mean, but it's true: don't assume everything is about you. the world doesn't revolve around you.

    just because someone has passed nclex and has amassed years of experience and is a fantastic bedside nurse does not mean he/she is also a great teacher. some are good at it...others, not so much. unfortunately, sometimes nurses who don't want to precept are forced to. it's not fair to the new employee, and it's not fair to the experienced nurse.

    if you're expecting everyone to be all sunshine and roses, you're going to spend your life being unemployed.
    Ruby Vee likes this.
  7. 1
    I used to CRY every day at work for the first few months. I'd get home, and I'd cry. I'd cry on the way TO work, I'd cry the day before because I had to go to work. I hated it, and I was bent on finding a new job. I did stick with it though and once I got through that initial training period, was on my own and started to get more comfortable in my own skin as a nurse- my job isn't so bad and I'm more than happy to be employed.
    Ruby Vee likes this.
  8. 0
    welcome to allnurses! we're a very helpful group and are here to offer sympathy, a listening ear, ideas,
    to share similar awful exeriences and how we survived.

    unfortunately, all precepters aren't all sweet wonderful kind helpful people. it would be great if they were
    but that isn't how the world works.

    my first precepter was the precepter everyone expects to get. a week later, her husband had an mi and she
    took an extended leave of absence and was replaced by the nurse from the pits of ... uh... heck. her voice reminded me of the noise a fork makes when it scrapes your teeth.

    my mom called me over the first weekend and the inevitable flood of tears came, she asked if i were learning despite her attitude. i was. then she said if i could somehow force myself to tune out the fisheye looks and
    her obnoxious voice, not only would i become a more knowledgeable rn, but the exerience would force me to grow
    up.

    it was a hard lesson, but this many years later, i realize dealing with her helped my dealing with obnoxious people
    skills to grow.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top