have you ever "written up" yourself in an incident report? - page 6

especially when you could have swept it under the carpet.......a short while back, l went into the pt room to give an IM inj. Almost always, l draw up meds in the med area, for some reason, that... Read More

  1. by   the ole filly
    I just made my 3 rd medication error in 20 years of nursing. Unfortunately it is the 3rd one this year and I am now being given a displinary action for it. That is what I get for being honest and hard work by reporting on myself. I did not harm anyone. What has changed this year is giving meds to 18-20 psych patients and working 2 double shifts a week and driving 2 1/2 hours each day. I am now doing all the meds and have no releif from the other nurses because of the way my shifts fall and they have been there the longest. when you get a written displine I am not sure what that exactly means. Has anyone ever had this problem. Maybe I need to find another job if I am hirable now. I am paranoid now. I would appreciate any help. I have always had excellent reviews until today. Thanks
  2. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Even though we have always been told honesty is the best policy. After seeing what I have seen, I would no longer write myself up for something minor that would cause no harm to the pt.

    I know an excellent RN who was called before her state board for something that I considered trivial, and felt that is was over-kill to notify the board. (I was a witness to what occurred, and wrote and signed a legal affidavit as to what I observed).

    Anyway, her BON somehow got records dating back to the 1970s from another state, of self write-ups for med-errors this nurse had written on herself. They were for things like forgetting to give a pt a colace, giving a colace instead of a pericolace and other minor med errors. The BON used these 30 yr old self-write ups against this nurse, trying to prove a history of unsafe practice.

    The BON also found out this nurse had been in psychotherapy in the 1970s. They petitioned to get the private records of her therapy sessions!

    They were unable to get them, but only because this nurse spent $thousands$ in lawyer fees to stop them.
  3. by   CapeCodMermaid
    WE all may think colace instead of pericolace is minor, but in this state - Massachusetts - surveyors make a huge deal out of minor things. We had one nurse give a mulitvitamin instead of a multivitamin with minerals. You would have thought that he had given the patient rat poison! At one facility I worked at, each time a nurse made a med error (or each time they were found out) I, the SDC, had to do a 3 page "investigation" and give them a copy of "The Rights and Wrongs of Med Pass"...all in an effort to have something to show the state if they came in. :angryfire
  4. by   nialloh
    The problem with punishing nurses who report themselves is that it will make other nurses who witness their treatment keep quiet. If a nurse is going to be very badly punished, or lose their license for a small mistake, they will most likely hide that small mistake. And maybe a not so small mistake too.
    This means that the hospital/home loses an opportunity to find a potential system flaw in their med dispensing that could harm or kill a pt. A med error should be used as a learning experience.
  5. by   the ole filly
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    Even though we have always been told honesty is the best policy. After seeing what I have seen, I would no longer write myself up for something minor that would cause no harm to the pt.

    I know an excellent RN who was called before her state board for something that I considered trivial, and felt that is was over-kill to notify the board. (I was a witness to what occurred, and wrote and signed a legal affidavit as to what I observed).

    Anyway, her BON somehow got records dating back to the 1970s from another state, of self write-ups for med-errors this nurse had written on herself. They were for things like forgetting to give a pt a colace, giving a colace instead of a pericolace and other minor med errors. The BON used these 30 yr old self-write ups against this nurse, trying to prove a history of unsafe practice.

    The BON also found out this nurse had been in psychotherapy in the 1970s. They petitioned to get the private records of her therapy sessions!

    They were unable to get them, but only because this nurse spent $thousands$ in lawyer fees to stop them.
    I just wanted to say thank you for your imput. I am still bumbed out about the situation and what will happen will happen. I guess it is out of my control now. Thanks
  6. by   the ole filly
    Quote from nialloh
    The problem with punishing nurses who report themselves is that it will make other nurses who witness their treatment keep quiet. If a nurse is going to be very badly punished, or lose their license for a small mistake, they will most likely hide that small mistake. And maybe a not so small mistake too.
    This means that the hospital/home loses an opportunity to find a potential system flaw in their med dispensing that could harm or kill a pt. A med error should be used as a learning experience.
    You are correct. thanks for the imput
  7. by   cindyrn1
    Nursing is probably the hardest most stressful job there is right now. We are all going to make mistakes. My license was turned in by a hospital for a couple of things that I didn't even know I had done including something about my medications and passing them. I never made a med error there once! Needless to say, my State Board cleared me of any wrong doing. But it is evident that where you work is causing you to make these mistakes because of lack of staff and having too much responsibilities in one day! If I were you, I would be looking for another job where you don't have to drive as far per day and where you can comfortably administer medications without fearing of making a med error. I feel for you I really do. A write up only means that they have something in your file to turn to if the incidents continue to happen. I know an LPN that got a write up for administering Thorazine instead of Compazine to a psychotic patient (because the generic brands are so close in name). They didn't do anything to her for it, just put it in her file in case there were further problems. Have faith in yourself but do yourself a favor and find a job where you don't have so much on your back all day. Psych patients are a handful without having to do the meds too. I know how that goes too as I was in psych for 16 years. It is no fun doing meds and taking care of them! Hang in there and best of luck.
















    Quote from the ole filly
    I just made my 3 rd medication error in 20 years of nursing. Unfortunately it is the 3rd one this year and I am now being given a displinary action for it. That is what I get for being honest and hard work by reporting on myself. I did not harm anyone. What has changed this year is giving meds to 18-20 psych patients and working 2 double shifts a week and driving 2 1/2 hours each day. I am now doing all the meds and have no releif from the other nurses because of the way my shifts fall and they have been there the longest. when you get a written displine I am not sure what that exactly means. Has anyone ever had this problem. Maybe I need to find another job if I am hirable now. I am paranoid now. I would appreciate any help. I have always had excellent reviews until today. Thanks
  8. by   the ole filly
    Quote from cindyrn1
    Nursing is probably the hardest most stressful job there is right now. We are all going to make mistakes. My license was turned in by a hospital for a couple of things that I didn't even know I had done including something about my medications and passing them. I never made a med error there once! Needless to say, my State Board cleared me of any wrong doing. But it is evident that where you work is causing you to make these mistakes because of lack of staff and having too much responsibilities in one day! If I were you, I would be looking for another job where you don't have to drive as far per day and where you can comfortably administer medications without fearing of making a med error. I feel for you I really do. A write up only means that they have something in your file to turn to if the incidents continue to happen. I know an LPN that got a write up for administering Thorazine instead of Compazine to a psychotic patient (because the generic brands are so close in name). They didn't do anything to her for it, just put it in her file in case there were further problems. Have faith in yourself but do yourself a favor and find a job where you don't have so much on your back all day. Psych patients are a handful without having to do the meds too. I know how that goes too as I was in psych for 16 years. It is no fun doing meds and taking care of them! Hang in there and best of luck.
    Just wanted to day thank you for your help and encouragement
  9. by   Gompers
    Yes, I wrote myself up for a med error during my first year working as a nurse. I had given two full doses of IV morphine to a baby who had been extubated the shift before I came on. When I went to chart the doses off in the comptuer, I noticed that the morphine order had expired an hour before I gave the first of those two doses!!! I called the doctor and explained, and she was nice enough to put in an order for two extra doses so I could at least legally chart them off. But then she put through an order for Narcan just in case we needed it and gave me a little lecture. I spent the next four hours watching each breath that child took - good thing we were in isolation and I was 1:1 with him!

    In the morning I wrote up an incident report, then took it to my NM office and bawled my eyes out. She said that it happens to everyone, and since the baby was fine I shouldn't worry so much. She did tell me that it was a little more serious because giving narcotics without an order is a biiiiiiiiig no-no, so she did file the report. Then she told me that she wasn't going to punish me, because the emotional beating I was giving myself was way beyond anything she would ever do to me.
  10. by   rn711
    Quote from the ole filly
    I just made my 3 rd medication error in 20 years of nursing. Unfortunately it is the 3rd one this year and I am now being given a displinary action for it. That is what I get for being honest and hard work by reporting on myself. I did not harm anyone. What has changed this year is giving meds to 18-20 psych patients and working 2 double shifts a week and driving 2 1/2 hours each day. I am now doing all the meds and have no releif from the other nurses because of the way my shifts fall and they have been there the longest. when you get a written displine I am not sure what that exactly means. Has anyone ever had this problem. Maybe I need to find another job if I am hirable now. I am paranoid now. I would appreciate any help. I have always had excellent reviews until today. Thanks
    Usually a written disciplinary report is just that. It goes in your personnel file. Your head nurse or nurse manager also verbally counsels you on your error. At my prior place of employment, we used a scale which included things like pt/nurse ratio, if the nurse was in a different location than her norm, was there any harm to patient, etc. The scoring system then assigned a number to the incident. The higher the number, the more serious the incident. You get my drift. Hang in there!
  11. by   pumpkinsooner
    When I worked nights in an ICU, we had a forty-something female who had an MI at home, arrested, and no one at her house knew CPR. EMTs arrived and resuscitated her but too late to prevent cerebral damage. When we got her, she was on a vent and posturing, and had no potential for any improvement. (First moral of this story: either have people in your house learn CPR, or get a tattoo that says "do not put hands here with intent to perform CPR" in the center of your chest. Do NOT allow a combination of the two. If CPR is started too late, this scenario is what will happen to you.)

    One morning, right before shift change, I was doing oral care and the respiratory therapist came in. He wanted to move the ET tube to the other side of her mouth, and I agreed -- she'd been in the unit for a week, and the tube was starting to break down that side of her mouth.

    When we tried to move the tube, she bit down really hard, but she had an oral airway in also so she wouldn't occlude the tube. The RT decides he needs to take out this oral airway, which he seemed not to have noticed before this point. Well, that was clue #1 the guy wasn't paying very close attention.

    I suggested we pass this off to the day shift, so they could consult family about possibly traching the patient, and I could get out of this mess I shouldn't have got myself into in the first place. But he kept trying, and he must have tried too hard, because when he got the oral airway to finally move, one of her lower front teeth came out with it. Root and all. The lady's HR went up a little, but no other response. I discovered at that moment why I did not choose dentistry as my profession. Yuck.

    That was the last time I listened to that RT. I put the tube in a specimen cup, gave it to the day charge nurse, and I wrote myself up; she was my patient and I was responsible. I never heard another thing about it, and I don't know what happened to the lady.

    Okay -- somebody top that.
  12. by   TinyNurse
    while while i was precepting i had a med surge nurse write herself up for not running an IV 25 cc/hr more than it was supposed to be....( problem turned out to be wrong charting in difrerent places/doc not upset) but I learned from there on out, IV errors are a definite reason to call a doc.
    i've only been a nurse 7 months, never wrote myself up yet. knock on wood. xoxo jen
  13. by   Ada Grace Lorenzo
    I felt so depressed for about a week. Maybe because I cant believe I am such an idiot when it comes to doing it in actual. Im just a student by the way and some people were trying to tell me that Im not bound to be a nurse. I cant help but to burst in tears for about a week (can you imagine?). I thought I'll be commiting suicide. I've been through hell. Right now, Im trying to pull myself together. Ahhhhh...this is killing me!

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