Have you ever done CPR off duty? - page 3

All these current threads about CPR got me wondering, how many nurses have been off duty and had to do CPR? Have you ever been at the mall, or in a store, or at a ballgame, etc. and had to do CPR... Read More

  1. by   fetch33
    Quote from nurseklw72
    Just in case you don't want to do breaths, here's a little bit of info that I heard about in my latest CPR class: Apparently, in Europe, compressions are done but rescue breathing is not. Studies have shown that the success rate of CPR is higher in Europe than in America. This is why we have increased our ratio to 30/2.

    We had a code on our unit a few days ago. I was at the head trying like heck to ventilate the man. Another nurse was on the chest pumping away. I couldn't get a breath in. When I asked him to pause slightly so I could get in a couple breaths the resident said 'NO don't stop'. Aren't we supposed to pause slightly to get the breaths in?
  2. by   rnin02
    Quote from fetch33
    We had a code on our unit a few days ago. I was at the head trying like heck to ventilate the man. Another nurse was on the chest pumping away. I couldn't get a breath in. When I asked him to pause slightly so I could get in a couple breaths the resident said 'NO don't stop'. Aren't we supposed to pause slightly to get the breaths in?
    I was taught most recently 30 compressions to 2 breaths. A partial reason for this change is people give breaths incorrectly, create too much pressure and the compressions are not as effective. But I would still think those breaths are important, you need some oxygen to circulate, right?
    I've never had to do CPR, but I have had to do the Heimlech on my husband a couple times...he needs to learn to chew!
  3. by   porcelina22
    This is probably a stupid question- but as far as infectious diseases go, what are you going to catch by doing mouth-to-mouth? Aside from a cold, maybe Herpes if you managed your ENTIRE life without it (up to 90% of the adult population has Type 1 already), and in an incredibly rare instance RSV or Chicken Pox, what are you going to catch that is harmful?

    There's probably a really obvious answer that I'm missing, but my little breain hasn't recovered from an extended Christmas break quite yet.
  4. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from fetch33
    We had a code on our unit a few days ago. I was at the head trying like heck to ventilate the man. Another nurse was on the chest pumping away. I couldn't get a breath in. When I asked him to pause slightly so I could get in a couple breaths the resident said 'NO don't stop'. Aren't we supposed to pause slightly to get the breaths in?
    from what I understand, breaths must be altered with compressions when performing CPR on a non intubated person, however, when intubated, compressions can be done simultaneously while ventilation is taking place. Someone please correct me if I am wrong...haven't had ACLS yet, but this is what was explained to me by another nurse.
  5. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from porcelina22
    This is probably a stupid question- but as far as infectious diseases go, what are you going to catch by doing mouth-to-mouth? Aside from a cold, maybe Herpes if you managed your ENTIRE life without it (up to 90% of the adult population has Type 1 already), and in an incredibly rare instance RSV or Chicken Pox, what are you going to catch that is harmful?

    There's probably a really obvious answer that I'm missing, but my little breain hasn't recovered from an extended Christmas break quite yet.
    I was curious so I did some checking around, and found that these are transmittable through mouht-to-mouth resucitation: salmonella, tuberculosis, N.meningitis, Hepatitis B. Hep C requires blood to pass from victim to rescuer, but if there's blood in mouth or patient pukes up blood, well....same thing with HIV: risk extremely low through saliva, but I don't care HOW tiny the risk, it's a risk. Also, same thing with Hep C: any blood in mouth getting to rescuer, there's now exposure.

    Seems harmful enough to me!
    Last edit by RNsRWe on Jan 26, '07
  6. by   RNsRWe
    by the way, I carry a little pocket-sized mask/gloves pack in my purse, so doing it "naked" is not going to be an issue. I would not be doing it any other way.
  7. by   EricJRN
    Quote from RNsRWe
    I was curious so I did some checking around, and found that these are transmittable through mouht-to-mouth resucitation: salmonella
    I've implemented a no-CPR-for-pythons policy that will greatly reduce my risk of CPR-related salmonellosis.
  8. by   Lil1Flip
    okay I read and now I am going to respond. I have only performed CPR twice as a nurse (neither survived) and as a volunteer EMT 12 with only 1 surviving initial crisis died a week later. It does come to you. I remember the very first arrest I had and the adrenaline. Of course my 1st had to be a liver transplant recepient not to far in the post op phas;e with a lot of staples. As I started compressions I felt bones popping it was the most nauseating thing ever of course that was as an EMT.

    On the scene just remember this is not your emergency and focus on what we are always taught ABC's. You can see my ratio 0:14 but I know that my effort gave a greater chance than not doing anything.
  9. by   Dalzac
    Back in my younger nursing days I rode on a mobile CCU so I have done many many codes out in the street. I have also done mouth-to-mouth many time "naked" and out of dozens of times I have to say only one got me. Some little old wino had TB and the coroner called me and told me. I was positive PPD and took INH and b6 for a year. would I do it any different? Probably not. The idea of standing there and watching another human being die because I had no mask is positivly abhorrent to me.
  10. by   burn out
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    from what I understand, breaths must be altered with compressions when performing CPR on a non intubated person, however, when intubated, compressions can be done simultaneously while ventilation is taking place. Someone please correct me if I am wrong...haven't had ACLS yet, but this is what was explained to me by another nurse.
    2005 ACLS guidelines are 2 breaths /30 compressions for 2 minutes then allow time for reassessment of patient and or AED assessment for shock or no shock, pulse etc and give meds, then start next two minute cycle of cpr 2 breaths /30 compressions (continue the 2 minute cycle even if the patient wakes up)
    Last edit by burn out on Jan 27, '07
  11. by   blueheaven
    I've done CPR in the community setting only 2 times. Our church choir had just completed singing in another church and we were getting ready for evening service in our own church. The guys were bringing in equipment etc. One of the men went up on the risers, sat down, put his head in his hand and just fell over. I ran up and immediately started CPR, there was another nurse there and she helped. EMS was 5 minutes in getting there. Unfortunately he did not make it. What made it worse was his wife was a former ICU nurse.
    The other time was at WalMart. Guy went down, promptly turned blue, pulseless. Initiated CPR, got a thready pulse. The EMS crew that arrived were "greenhorns" and did NOT follow ACLS protocol, nor the ABCs. Talk about frustrated! I often wonder if this man would have survived if a "more seasoned" crew had answered the 911 call. BTW I did report them.
  12. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from burn out
    Yes I had to do cpr on my own mother. I had gone to her apartment as usual in the morning but she was still in bed and said she wasn't feeling good, she had chest pain and back pain all night and had taken ntg but had gotten no relief and was sick to her stomach. While I was calling 911 she collapsed and I had to start CPR. There was no equipment, no one to help
    (i remember screaming for help while doing compressions, there was no suction and I tried pulling the secretions out of the back of her throat with my hands) EMS took forever..it was a fight for her between me and GOD ...and he won.

    Oh, My God...I am so sorry to hear this. How do you deal with this, now?
  13. by   pagandeva2000
    I also worry about making a mistake. I am not exposed to codes or CPR on a regular basis, so, I admit, I am afraid. I just took CPR last week, and it made me think; because this was my first time taking CPR as an LPN, where I am definitely responsible for the outcome of the patient. Reading this reminds me that I have to purchase a few face shields. I am already a walking suitcase...I always carry my digital thermometer, automated blood pressure reader, drug book, herbal book and stethoscope...I guess that one more thing... a mask is good.

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