Has anyone switched from a BSN program to an ADN?

  1. My daughter wants to be a nurse. We are encouraging her to go through an ADN program only because that way she can live at home without having to worry about where her next meal is coming from. (She is a senior in high school, no savings yet, just started working.) She can't tell me why she wants a BSN, just that she wants to go to the same school her best friend is going to. Best friend will not be going into nursing. I have heard of people going from one ADN program to another for different reasons, but I've never heard of a BSN student being able to switch to an ADN program.

    We would not be supporting her completely if she lived at home, but there's a huge difference in paying us $100 rent than 5 times that much in the city, plus having to pay for food and utilities. I don't want to discourage her but I know that if she tries it she will not be able to make it and will end up dropping out. And no, I am not trying to sabotage her. We know what her financial situation is and she would not make it.

    Any ideas?
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  2. 36 Comments

  3. by   Halinja
    Quote from TazziRN
    My daughter wants to be a nurse. We are encouraging her to go through an ADN program only because that way she can live at home without having to worry about where her next meal is coming from. (She is a senior in high school, no savings yet, just started working.) She can't tell me why she wants a BSN, just that she wants to go to the same school her best friend is going to. Best friend will not be going into nursing. I have heard of people going from one ADN program to another for different reasons, but I've never heard of a BSN student being able to switch to an ADN program.

    We would not be supporting her completely if she lived at home, but there's a huge difference in paying us $100 rent than 5 times that much in the city, plus having to pay for food and utilities. I don't want to discourage her but I know that if she tries it she will not be able to make it and will end up dropping out. And no, I am not trying to sabotage her. We know what her financial situation is and she would not make it.

    Any ideas?
    That's a toughy. Both my older kids are pretty sure they know more than I do...they may even be right, but I've got a little bit of road wear, so sometimes I have the common sense they lack. Sigh.

    I sat down with the boys and made them a budget. One for staying home, one for going it out there on their own. I laid them out side by side and had them go through everything...and equated it to hours worked. This would cost you X many hours to pay for, this would cost you XX hours to pay for...etc.

    If she's wanting to do a BSN, that means a lot of study time. So...you might say, okay, add up all the hours that its going to take to pay for everything. Now add on class hours, with four hours study time for every one in the seat (or whatever they say is standard these days, that's what my school says...and in nursing school, it really does add up like that.) After she subtracts the working hours, and the school/study hours, how much time does that leave her to even SEE her best friend?

    Don't know if that'd work, but it couldn't hurt!
  4. by   Tweety
    If you know she won't make it simply ask. "How are you going to pay for it? What are your plans?" You have to sit down and with her and discuss the realities of your financial situation and what you can and can not pay and if she goes the BSN route what you will and will not pay, and that she'll have to take out loans, which unfortunately nowadays most kids have to do.


    You realize at this age some kids just can't wait for that freedom, no matter what the cost., and the thought of friends going to a campus school while she lives at home with mom and dad may be just too high a price to pay. Don't expect practicality at that age, emotions tend to rule a bit more.

    For young people I always advise, get the BSN out of the way as early as possible. However, both ADNs and BSN come out of school pretty much on equal footing, enjoying the same opportunities. and making the same amount of money and there are plenty of RN to BSN programs, and an employer might even pay for it. The value of the BSN is later jobs in management, teaching, research, case management, etc.

    It should be a family decision. She might have a bitter pill to swallow, but life's like that.

    Good luck.
  5. by   TazziRN
    Actually she could live at her mother's but she hates her stepdad and wants to move out. Originally she was planning on moving in with her dad and me and go to school here, until she found out where her best friend was planning on going. Daddy is doing the financial lesson thingy now.
  6. by   Multicollinearity
    What about a compromise solution? She could live with you and go to community college for 2 years to do her BSN pre-reqs. Then after two years she could: a) transer to the university for the BSN program and take out loans or b) stay at the community college and do the ADN program with many BSN pre-reqs out of the way.

    I guess I am talking about giving more ideas and options, so this isn't an all-or-nothing decision. For example, maybe bring up the idea of trying the community college for 2 semesters and see how it goes. Then re-evaluate.
  7. by   BonnieSc
    I'm going to be very blunt. You have to let her make her own decisions, whether you think they're practical or not. She has her own reasons for her preferences, and those reasons, whatever they are, deserve respect too. If it doesn't work out for her, then she will have learned a far more valuable lesson than she will from you and her father talking her into going for an ADN against her wishes.

    Personally, I think most young adults NEED to be away from home, unless there are some strong extenuating circumstances. They have to learn about independence, about the real world, and yes, about failure.

    I disagree that it should be a family decision, except for giving any advice that she asks for and being a sounding board. This is her life. Give her the same amount of money you would if she was at home and leave it at that.

    She CAN afford to attend BSN school; I speak as someone who attended an expensive private college with no parental funds, because there weren't any to give. I did get a grant; I also worked during school and took out loans. Some parents are anti-student-loan, and I don't understand why. With a BSN degree, your daughter is going to be more than able to pay off those loans when she graduates. There are worse things to invest in than an education.

    By saying "I know if she tries it she will not be able to make it", you ARE sabotaging her.

    Finally, yes, she could certainly switch to an ADN program if she really wanted to. Colleges don't care where you get your prereqs. Remember that if an ADN program has a waiting list, it can take longer to get in there than it would to get into the clinical nursing program at a BSN school.
  8. by   Multicollinearity
    Wendy,

    I agree with some of what you said. However, just because you found a way to attend a BSN program doesn't mean everyone else can. She may or may not be able to get grants. She may or may not be able to study enough to keep her grades up while working enough to pay her bills. I guess I am trying to say that just because it worked out for you -- doesn't mean it can or will for everyone else.
  9. by   Halinja
    Wendy79, I don't think the point was that anyone was going to forbid or force anyone. The point was making sure that she fully understood ALL of the circumstances, consequences, and options before she made her choice.
    Last edit by Halinja on Oct 20, '06
  10. by   gauge14iv
    My son is at a major university - away from home. I admit I was really worried about the whole financial aspect but it has worked out ok. The financial aid programs, scholarships, loans and grants he has gotten have covered everything including his living expenses. Granted - he isn't living high on the hog, but he is doing just fine. He will have some debt to pay coming out of school - but I don't know that that's a bad thing. It's an investment he is making in himself.

    I personally think it is the absolute best thing he could have done for himself - I just had to trust him to know that.
  11. by   TazziRN
    (I disagree that it should be a family decision, except for giving any advice that she asks for and being a sounding board. This is her life. Give her the same amount of money you would if she was at home and leave it at that.)

    I disagree. It is a family decision because she brought the family into it.

    (With a BSN degree, your daughter is going to be more than able to pay off those loans when she graduates.)

    EXCUSE ME?????? You wanna rephrase that one?????

    (By saying "I know if she tries it she will not be able to make it", you ARE sabotaging her.)

    By saying this here, where she does not go, to all of you instead of her, I'm sabotaging her? How????

    (Wendy79, I don't think the point was that anyone was going to forbid or force anyone. The point was making sure that she fully understood ALL of the circumstances, consequences, and options before she made her choice.)

    Thank you, Halinja.

    I love my daughter and want nothing more than for her to succeed. However, I also know my daughter, which none of you do. I know what will happen to her because I know her. To let her go straight from high school to a BSN program without the support of her family and her home would be like throwing her in the deep end.

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  12. by   RussA
    I think some of the response is slightly off the beaten path from the original question. Has anyone switched from a BSN program to an ADN.

    TazzRN - as you know, a BSN program takes you through GenEd, Science, and Nursing courses. So, a person can withdraw, and enter an ADN program. Again, it's dependent on completion of the ADN pre-reqs, and other entry stiplulations...by merit or waiting list (first come basis).

    For University vs Community College cost - it's what you can afford/obtain through grants/loans. Personally, I wished my children started off in a community college...but they both wanted to go to a University. My eldest got his MBA 1 1/2 years ago, and his younger brother has another semester to go to earn his MBA (both on my dime). So it cost me a bit more, but I think its well worth it.

    Good luck on your family decision
  13. by   TazziRN
    Okay, I should clarify: I'm not talking about the gen ed/pre-reqs, but the nursing classes.
  14. by   RussA
    Matriculation for nursing classes from a university's 4-year program to a community college nursing program is "probaly" nil.

    It appears that each college has their own methodology what subjects are taught at each point of the curriculum.

    The program I attended were based on 4 semesters. 1 & 2 for LPN, Semester 3 & 4 for ASN. Each semester had a theory and clinical phase -these needed to be simutanously passed. Failure in theory or clinical required both to be taken again. Program also allowed new students with a LPN license to entry into the 3rd semester.

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