Hair color--is it that big of an issue? - page 2

Hi everyone! I'm new on this board so I don't know if this was discussed yet but............. I love dying my hair. The color I love having it most is bright red. Problem is...I'm also... Read More

  1. by   TinyNurse
    I am so sorry that this question even needs to be asked. As nurses we learn constantly about cultural diversity, but when a nurse wants to express her cultural diversity, she has to wonder if it will affect her job. Something just isn't right with that!

    The truth is, a "not normal" hair color may negatively affect you during your job search. Personally, I'd dye it normal for the interview, then dye it back after getting the job.

    Another tip is to move to a major city and work at a level I hospital. When I was in San Diego at a level I, ALOT of the nurses had facial piercings, and quite a few of them had very "un-natural" looking highlights/lowlights.

    Your "look" shouldn't matter. Patient care should! Nurses are human too, and sometimes we all like to experiment a bit with our hair color/style, jewelry, scrubs, etc. Sometimes I think that administration needs a refresh course on cultural diversity and respect.
  2. by   mugwump
    I don't mean to start a big debate but when did red hair on someone with asian ethnicity (not natural but dyed) become cultural diversity. This isn't someone who is jewish needing permission to wear a yamika or for religious reasons permission to keep hair covered.
  3. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from mugwump
    I don't mean to start a big debate but when did red hair on someone with asian ethnicity (not natural but dyed) become cultural diversity. This isn't someone who is jewish needing permission to wear a yamika or for religious reasons permission to keep hair covered.
    I wouldn't consider it cultural diversity merely because she is Asian, but it would be considered cultural diversity if she was part of a sub-culture in her area that followed such practices. Culture is a learned process, and you don't have to necessarily be born into it. I do feel it is more of an expression of personal identity...but nonetheless.
  4. by   TinyNurse
    Hi Mugwump,

    I'm not saying that "red hair on an asian" constitutes cultural diversity. I'm saying that cultural diversity doesn't have to be a "standard culture" i.e amish, mexican, southern, etc.

    If doing something to your hair feels right to you, and it suits you, then I believe that is your own "cultural diversity".

    Don't worry, no big debate, just wanted to explain what I mean. Hope it comes across right.
  5. by   RebeccaJeanRN
    Red mohawk? Too conspicuous for nursing school or an interview, and even for many places of employment. I never really understood why someone would tattoo all over their faces, and rule out so many jobs, just to express himself. Same with your hair. If I were the person hiring, I'd look and think "wow, this person is far more interested in a hair statement than the job...what other conventions will she think its important to buck"? Just being honest here. Employers like team players and people that aren't out to call extraordinary attention to themselves. Of course, they'd never say that about the hair. They just would not call back for that second interview. And maybe they'd miss out on hiring the best nurse ever...so if that's YOU, don't let it happen! (you can always buy a wig and be your creatively expressful self on off-hours)
  6. by   SaintSybella
    Perhaps big cities might be more leniant.
    I don't know, I was also thinking that if I worked in a big city, my hair could possibly help build that "trust" relationship (like what TinyNurse said to me earlier)....being it inner-city and all.

    I don't know. This is how I've been pretty much my whole life. ahhhh why must I make things so difficult for myself!! lol

    And my hair is long enough that I can tie it back. It looks completely normal when i have it down.
  7. by   Logan
    Hi,

    I see this issue as related to tattoos and piercings.

    I think the current policy is "you can be culturaly diverse on your own time - not on the company's time".

    Or something to that effect...

    Quote from mugwump
    I don't mean to start a big debate but when did red hair on someone with asian ethnicity (not natural but dyed) become cultural diversity. This isn't someone who is jewish needing permission to wear a yamika or for religious reasons permission to keep hair covered.
    "Cultural" doesn't always mean "traditional" (and vuice-versa).


    Thanks,
    Matthew

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