"The Good Ol' Days!" - page 2

by BostonTerrierLoverRN

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I was blown away to find out student nurses could not be married during school, when one of my instructors went to a Public Charity Hospital based Diploma Nursing Program. I loved hearing about having to sterilize everything,... Read More


  1. 10
    My first job I made $75 a week and lived at the hospital.
    I remember the Cuban missile crises, how JFK almost go us into a shooting war with the Russians.
    He was the first President to have a Comedy Album made about him "The First Family"
    Bach to Nursing, I remember having to sharping needles and put them in the old autoclave.
    Have to make your own NSS. By adding salt to water.
    I remember the old state mental hospital. Assisting the doctor in shock treatment. They would line the beds up in rows. The doctor would have this wooden box on a table. the electrodes would be attached to the box. With IV meds they would heavily sedate the patient. Then attach the electrodes to his head and then shock him. The patient's body would convulse and then relax. The Doc would move down the line to the next patient. There was no screen. The patient in the second bed would see the patient in the first be go through shock treatment knowing he would be next.
    Yup, They were the go old days.
  2. 2
    Quote from pockunit
    It is AMAZING to me how casual adoption used to be.
    Desperate times called for desperate measures.

    Unwed mothers had few choices back then, and not every place had decent "social services".

    Usually what a desperate teen or other unwed mother wanted was to get shot of the infant (hopefully to a good home) before her reputation (or what was left of it) was ruined.

    Of course one also didn't require tons of "ID" papers like today in order to get on in life; thus one's true BC (listing parents) may have rarely been called for. Indeed up until recently and still for all one knows it is/was possible to obtain a passport or other government ID with a litany of "other" paperwork and or simply two or more persons swearing an oath to who you were.
  3. 7
    I just remember my grandmother telling me that the first time she saw male genitalia was with her husband. In nursing school the textbooks all had fig leaves, and apparently, there were male aids that took care of cleaning those specific bits and pieces.

    She was also reprimanded in school for having lunch with a male friend (friend of the family I believe) in a public restaurant near the school. She lived on campus.

    Shame I never really asked her about her nursing experiences.
  4. 8
    Well heck, I'm read a book to my son tonight that I got from the library- it's a Mister Rogers book called "Going to the Hospital, and it's from 1987- I was well into school age by then, and the book just cracks me up- there was a page of steel cribs lined up, separated by pastel curtains, a photo of a doctor taking a child's blood pressure (PSHH! As if!) a giant IV pump looking thingy thing, and the nurses are all sporting bug eye glasses and mullets...and white bottoms. Nobody in our hospital wears white bottoms except students, and they're even shifting to all blue. It's a great book.

    My mom has been a pharmacy tech since 1971, and she has some good stories about how it used to be. At home, growing up we had a big GLASS IV bottle that was labeled normal saline, we used it as a spare change jar. When I was in school to be an LPN several years back, all my instructors were from the old school, and they had us crunching out drug calculations in the apothecary system. I have yet to see any grains or drams of anything. In fact, I told my mom about that, and she told the pharmacist she was working with (who had been in practice since the late 60's) and he said that if he ever saw something come across in the apothecary system, he'd personally track down the doc who wrote the script and box their ears.
  5. 10
    Have you ever read Nurse by Peggy Anderson? It was written in 1978, and is just an amazing piece of nursing and hospital history- a real slice of life. My favorite parts of that book involve smoking. Doctors smoking in the nurses' station, patients smoking in bed, stuff like that. It seems unbelievable now! It even seems hard to believe that in 1990, there was a smoking lounge in the hospital where I wore a candy-striped pinafore. Did that really happen?
  6. 5
    love the stories
  7. 5
    Quote from hey_suz
    Have you ever read Nurse by Peggy Anderson? It was written in 1978, and is just an amazing piece of nursing and hospital history- a real slice of life. My favorite parts of that book involve smoking. Doctors smoking in the nurses' station, patients smoking in bed, stuff like that. It seems unbelievable now! It even seems hard to believe that in 1990, there was a smoking lounge in the hospital where I wore a candy-striped pinafore. Did that really happen?
    Ohhh yes!

    About the only place it was forbidden during the "old days" was certain units, OR and any place there was O2 being given (hence all those "No Smoking Oxygen" signs.

    Patients smoked either in their rooms or in the bathrooms. Doctors and others smoked in the nurse's station or other facility lounges, and on it went. Indeed though one is not that old can remember as late as the 1980's many office buildings allowed workers to smoke in their offices or certain indoor areas.

    Nurse by Peggy Anderson was a great book and made an excellent television series! Still remember the quote from the book: "Doctors don't keep you alive, I do".
    GrnTea, ♑ Capricorn ♑, Esme12, and 2 others like this.
  8. 2
    These are great!

    My great-aunt worked in a TB sanatorium in Ukraine in the 1950's and she said most of the patients were vile and angry. They would contemptuously spit their blood-streaked phlegm on the floors or near the staff.
    RN2LuvU and BostonTerrierLoverRN like this.
  9. 5
    My Grandmother who turns 99 this year, started her career as a nurse by going to the Mater Hospital here in Brisbane and asking the Nuns if there was any work for her. She started her training as a Student Nurse by making toast in the kitchen and then she worked her way up from there. I trained as a Student Nurse for 2 years in the very same hospital that she started her career, only toast making wasn't one of my first competencies.
  10. 16
    Quote from hey_suz
    have you ever read nurse by peggy anderson? it was written in 1978, and is just an amazing piece of nursing and hospital history- a real slice of life. my favorite parts of that book involve smoking. doctors smoking in the nurses' station, patients smoking in bed, stuff like that. it seems unbelievable now! it even seems hard to believe that in 1990, there was a smoking lounge in the hospital where i wore a candy-striped pinafore. did that really happen?
    when hospitals went "no smoking", it was harder on the pulmonologists and cardiologists than it was on the patients! i remember having ash trays in the nurse's station for the physicians to use while they were "rounding" on their patients . . . we nurses had to go to the break room to smoke. seriously, you didn't want to be in either place if you were allergic to tobacco smoke! i had one colleague who used to pass meds with an ash tray on the med cart and a cigarette hanging out the corner of his mouth.

    a standard part of patient teaching was teaching the patients not to smoke with their oxygen on. seriously. i only remember two patients setting themselves on fire, but it was pretty dramatic.

    when i was a student, we were supposed to stand up and offer the physicians our chairs when they came into the nursing station. i thought that was an antiquated piece of nonsense until the day i was the nurse, there were five or six students cluttering up my nurses's station and no free chairs and a couple of the doctors came to do their orders. then i got it -- with nursing students taking up all the free space, there's no place for anyone to do their work. it was an "aha!" moment.

    metal bedpans were a trip -- they were always cold, and they made such a racket when someone threw them . . . . metal urinals were a trip, too. now somedays i wish we had them again. a 150 kg. patient can flatten a plastic bedpan and you have spillage all over your bed. a metal bedpan would hold up to the challenge.

    remember blue pens for day shift, green for pm shift and red for night shift?

    maalox and heat lamps for decubs? had a colleague set fire to the patient's bed by having the heat lamp too close . . . not a good outcome there.

    i started in the late 70s -- no iv pumps in our little hospital except for heparin. dopamine drips you counted drops, but we had ivac pumps for heparin. i remember titrating pressers by dropping an hour's worth of the drip into a buretrol and then counting drops. we were pretty accurate!


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