Going Back To Wearing Whites and The Cap! - page 7

Yeppers......strongly thinking about it! There's a nurse on my unit who wears her starched white nursing dress, white stockings, white shoes, and her nursing cap every tiime she works. ... Read More

  1. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    We didn't have caps at my two nursing colleges.

    But, I would love to wear one if I could. I work in dialysis and we get a lot of blood and chemicals on our clothes. It would really show in all white.

    I do feel like the white cap commands respect.
  2. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I see the name on the badge, comma, job title, as a title of respect.
  3. by   CseMgr1
    While I was proud of being capped, then receiving my Junior and Senior Stripes, followed by the removal of the stripe which signified graduation, I was glad when I didn't have to wear it anymore. It was a heavy, starched cap, which was constantly being knocked askew, every time I worked with a patient who had multiple IV's, etc. I haven't worn mine, since 1983, when I left hospital nursing and went into Home Health. I still have it, though...tucked away in the back of my dresser drawer, in an old Leggs Nurse White pantyhose box
  4. by   babs_rn
    Caps are SUCH an infection control problem. Also symbols of subservience. And as far as the whites go, well, you paint a room white to make it look bigger...you can imagine what it does for my imperfect rear view! My cap sits on the head of a teddy bear these days.
  5. by   MishlB
    I keep hearing the word classy...what you wear has NOTHING to do with how "classy" you are, or how good you are as a nurse. You can put a pig in a dress, but it's still a pig. Everyone assumes that patients care what we wear, a cap or all white. I don't think they really do. They know I am their nurse because I introduce myself as such, and the trust me based on my performance and attentiveness to their needs. I think the white dress, cap and hose is a little dated, and maybe a scream for attention?
  6. by   dianah
    (I actually have worn mine - dress, white nylons, cap, pins, etc - on Halloween a few times. Got many double-takes!! The phrase "scream for attention" reminded me . . . that was in another facility where dressing up for Halloween was OK)
  7. by   mobileLPN
    As a guy who has always been a fan of whites I have a few observations to make. When I wear hospital issue green scrubs or my own teal (left over from LPN school) or blue scrubs at work, I am often mistaken for the doctor, the lab or x-ray tech, or even housekeeping. This is despite the fact that my name badge has LPN in big lettters and I introduce myself as a nurse to every patient I take care of. When I wear my whites, everybody knows I'm a nurse. I always hear that whites are soiled too easily. That's the point! I'd hope that whatever color you wear, if you get blood or other fluids on you, you would change. Whites make it very clear what you've been dealing with.

    Being male, I have no personal experience with caps. I have worked with a few nurses and nursing students over the years who wore caps and must say that none looked anything but professional. Some people think the are meant to indicate subservience. I don't buy that for an instant. Airline pilots and Military officers wear caps, do we consider them subservient? No, we consider their uniforms a sign of their authority.

    One last observation.....

    Imagine you walk into your lawyers office, perhaps your incorporating a new business, or just need some contract advice.
    You look up from your paperwork and see your lawyer, the licensed professional that he or she is, wearing their pajamas.
    Think about it.



    -Aaron

    "He who trades liberty for safety deserves neither"
    -Benjamin Franklin
  8. by   justjenn
    If I am lucky enough to graduate school next year, I WILL be wearing white's, cap & yes, even cape. It was a dear friend of my Nana's. I have always been different & walk to my own beat, so it would not bother me.

    PLUS, I have talked to a few women who share the same views as me. Although they wouldn't wear the uniform if they were the only ones, if I did, they would too. I plan to form a club "NCS" Nurse's Cap Socitey.

    justjenn
  9. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Originally posted by justjenn
    If I am lucky enough to graduate school next year, I WILL be wearing white's, cap & yes, even cape. It was a dear friend of my Nana's. I have always been different & walk to my own beat, so it would not bother me.

    PLUS, I have talked to a few women who share the same views as me. Although they wouldn't wear the uniform if they were the only ones, if I did, they would too. I plan to form a club "NCS" Nurse's Cap Socitey.

    justjenn
    Just watch that cape so that you don't accidently get it caught on something.
  10. by   justjenn
    MishlB

    I work in a very -layed-back law office where I don't often work w/ the public. I am a behind-the-scenes person. My dress atire is normally blue jeans, or these pants that hang a smidge down from your waist. All my clothes are pretty much my boss' 14 yr. old daughters - hand-me-downs.

    When I am on the phone, I get treated with respect. When people come to our office & see me in person - they all think I am a kid and treat me different. It's like they don't think I am capable of doing the things that I was doing.

    Now, in the other law firm I worked for, I had to dress the "paralegal part." I didn't get respect from the attorneys, but did from the clients.

    It doesn't matter what you wear - doctors/lawyers will all treat you bad or underneath them regardless. I just live w/ it.

    Wish things were different.

    justjenn
  11. by   Ariko
    Originally posted by cheerfuldoer
    Ummmmmmm...ARIKO????????.....JNETTE......NOT me said that men wearing white looked like cooks. Just getting the usernames right for ya!


    A thousand pardons. Not my first charting error this week. (or is it weak?)
  12. by   Noney
    Cheerfuldoer

    I worked for 6 years in a facillity that required nurses to wear all whait and caps. The patients (geriatrics) could tell who was their nurse. Funny thing is when I quit there and went to another facility I would catch a glimpse of myself in the mirror and think "Oh no I forgot my cap" I also used to wear a white dress uniform occasionally. Too big for that now!

    You can was you cap with dishwashing liquid and a soft brush.
    I know a few nurses that threw their cap in the washer (by itself) then let it hang dry.
  13. by   SteelTownRN
    There really are two sides to the whites vs scrubs debate. On one hand, white is a color that is recognized by the public as being worn by nurses, and gives us instant recognizability. (How many non-nursing staf have been mistakenly identified as a nurse by patients and families?)

    The other side is that whites are a reflection of a time where nurses were subservient and little handmaidens, not the progressive professionals that we have evolved into over time. Whites seem almost impractical. Furthermore, as men increase in number in the profession, it is purely sexist to portray nurses in dresses and white caps, something not worn by men. Scrubs have become a necessity in many areas of the hospital, as infection control measures are implemented. I personally feel that ancillary staff (housekeeping, maintenance, dietary) have no business wearing scrubs, and only serve to confuse patients and families by wearing them. How many people wear nametags where the name AND service department are clearly visible? And, how many patients have the eyesight to even read them anyway? Just my two cents...

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