Gay / Lesbian patient resources for nurses? - page 2

are there any resources that you know of on the web that discuss care of glbt patients? how do you find gay / lesbian nurses are treated at work in the hospitals? is there any difference how how... Read More

  1. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    A person's sexual orientation, be it the patient or the nurse has nothing to do w/their care, IMO.
    Depending on what their care is for, it might have something to do with it.

    As far as how gay/lesbian nurses are treated at work, by their co-workers I assume you mean...again, why is that an issue? I do not discuss my sexual preference/orientation, nor do my co-workers. I have worked w/many gay/lesbian providers, and I react to them as I do anybody else......
    Really, sexual "issues" have no place at work.
    I agree.
  2. by   glbtnurse
    I agree that there should be no difference in the treatment of heterosexual vs. homosexual patients HOWEVER the GLBT community can be seen as a cultural group unto themselves. As a nurse you pay attention to cultural differences everyday and implement them into your care plans without even noticing it. (painting with broad brush strokes here ) An asian patient may have a family that is more apt to take care of them [feeding/a.m. care] whereas an American family places more value on independence and encouraging their family member to do things on their own to build up strength. Both cultural grouping have the same good intentions but are coming from different perspectives and would appreciate it if nurses recognized where they were coming from to build a strong pt-nurse relationship. GLBT patients sometimes have different stressors than the heterosexual population and nurses should be attentive to those needs as much as those of any other cultural grouping.

    Finally, when I talk about GLBT nursing care I don't think it is a matter of asking about their sex life as one post stated rather it is knowing how they identify themselves.
  3. by   geekgolightly
    It is a very common thing to talk about one's personal life. Poeple ask me, "So are you married?" or "how long have you been with him?" These are delves into my personal life and I enjoy sharing with my coworkers and my patients when asked. Sometimes I volunteer the information. It's how we make friends in the workplace.

    When someone is gay, there should be a comfort level wherein there is no hesitation to share as freely as a hetero would baout their personal lives... and, quite frankly, there isn't. I have an interesting perspective as a bisexual who is married to a male, so I "pass," and have heard negative comments on a fairly regular basis from some of my coworkers about gay men, and lesbians. Not only that, but people assume you are Christian (I am not, I am Buddhist) and I have gotten the strange stare once that information is divulged. There is an otherness related to non christian, non hetero, and other non dominant persuasions, and those outside of the circle DO feel left out.

    I strongly support the transgendered and even feel akin to them even though I do not wish to permanently change my body parts, and I have heard some rather evil things about them coming from nurses mouths. This is when it's hardest for me.

    For those of you asking "why are you asking?" I think you're putting your head in the sand and pretending there is no problem. There very much is.
  4. by   medicrnohio
    Quote from moondancer
    A person's sexual orientation, be it the patient or the nurse has nothing to do w/their care, IMO.
    But a persons sexual orientation can have a lot do with things. Consider these issues...visiting your partner in the hospital, making decisions for your partner if they are sick or injured, healthcare providers assuming you are heterosexual. I actually had my own ex-doctor say to me "Well you are a heterosexual, aren't you?" It was obvious to me that he did not approve of my being a lesbian and therefore he is no longer my doc. My current OB/GYN won't even discuss the issue with me. I can't find a doctor willing to sign papers so that my partner and I can have a child through artificial insemination. And much much more........

    Indeed a person's sexual orientation can have a lot to do with it....whether they be the patient or the nurse and I've been on both sides.
  5. by   medicrnohio
    Quote from glbtnurse
    What I meant by gay / lesbian nursing website is that it would act like a publication where glbt nurses could exchange information about their specific experiences in the health care environment. In addition to that, one has to look at the GLBT populations' specific health care need and how one could steer health promotion to become more effective. Examine issues like homophobia in health care settings etc.
    I think this is a great idea. I love the idea and I'd love to help you out with it if you need any help. Please feel free to PM me at any time.
  6. by   Bipley
    Quote from glbtnurse
    Are there any resources that you know of on the web that discuss care of GLBT patients? How do you find gay / lesbian nurses are treated at work in the hospitals? Is there any difference how how patients treat them?
    Sissy is gay. She has a girlfriend... Stacy. I'd give my retirement if she would fall in love with a man. NOT because it is better to be in love with a man but instead... it is SAFER to be in love with a man.

    Believe me, I have told Sissy that if we can put a man on the moon, we can put a man on her. She disagrees. Okay... so be it. The fact remains, it is safer for our overall physical well being if someone is straight.

    If one is gay, one is gay. Period, the end. It doesn't mean the rational folks in this world feel it is a bad thing. Nurses don't like those that don't fit the mold. (I'm gonna get slammed, just watch) But you know what? It's true.

    To be a well liked {not talked about} nurse, you have to be female, married to a male (prefers a person in medicine) and FEMALE through and through. Gay doesn't cut the mustard.

    I'm not claiming this is right or that I agree. I AM claiming this is my experience and opinion.
  7. by   Bipley
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    Depending on what their care is for, it might have something to do with it.
    Ohhh? How?

    Specifics, please.
  8. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from Bipley
    Ohhh? How?

    Specifics, please.
    Someone else already covered this.


    visiting your partner in the hospital, making decisions for your partner if they are sick or injured, healthcare providers assuming you are heterosexual.
  9. by   hondurena
    As a professional discussing your sexual orientation/preference with a client is a . When caring for pts I do not get into conversations about whether i am married or single or gay/lesbian. I keep small talk short. Too many times pts have divulged information to me about my co-workers that i didn't even know. Pts on a unit too long become bored and gossip about everything-- they can even tell you who died on another floor and what time. Secondly i am not anti gay/lesbian--- but we all need to tone it down a bit. I was on a unit one night expecting an admission--- ER gave me report on a male patient, bedboard assigned him to a room. When he arrived on the unit with a long luxurios hair weave, make-up and long manicured nails--- my CNA's (older ladies) were so confused. They put him in a female room, when i heard the commotion i moved him to his assigned room--- the other male in the room was like what the !@#$ --- i thought the poor old man was going to code. I spent the rest of the shift playing musical chairs. It was not my duty to start inservices on gay/lesbian/transgender patient room assignments. I suggested the hospital open a med/surg unit for gay/lesbian---- why not they do it in prisons.
    I am not hatin-- please don't get me wrong-- but when issues like these arise we as professionals must accomodate every human being we care for and put our personal feelings aside--- but we cannot control other patients and their beliefs or opinions
  10. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    As a professional discussing your sexual orientation/preference with a client is a .
    But if they happen to ask if you're married, etc.....
  11. by   geekgolightly
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    But if they happen to ask if you're married, etc.....

    I like the "my partner and i..." route, and if they ask further, then they asked for more info, go ahead!

    And personally, I like to share aspects of my personal life, such as my husband and children and feel that anyone should be comfortable to share that as well.
  12. by   Tweety
    Quote from Bipley
    Sissy is gay. She has a girlfriend... Stacy. I'd give my retirement if she would fall in love with a man. NOT because it is better to be in love with a man but instead... it is SAFER to be in love with a man.

    Believe me, I have told Sissy that if we can put a man on the moon, we can put a man on her. She disagrees. Okay... so be it. The fact remains, it is safer for our overall physical well being if someone is straight.

    If one is gay, one is gay. Period, the end. It doesn't mean the rational folks in this world feel it is a bad thing. Nurses don't like those that don't fit the mold. (I'm gonna get slammed, just watch) But you know what? It's true.

    To be a well liked {not talked about} nurse, you have to be female, married to a male (prefers a person in medicine) and FEMALE through and through. Gay doesn't cut the mustard.

    I'm not claiming this is right or that I agree. I AM claiming this is my experience and opinion.
    You're absolute right. Nurses are part of society and society likes straight. It's the norm, it's safer.

    Too bad. I'm not going to fit the mold because that's just what nurses and other people are comfortable with. Nurses and society have to change, (or at the very least educate yourself and be tolerate and accepting) not me. End of discussion.
    Last edit by Tweety on Jan 1, '06
  13. by   Really An Actress
    "Tone it down"? That's one of the most homophobic comments I've ever heard. You mean stay in the closet, don't you?

    In my experience health care workers are among the most intolerant of the GLBT community. It's very sad, really, that racist or homophobic nurses can think they can hold hateful thoughts and still believe they give the same good care to their patients.

    Bipley, I would advise you not to try to change someone's sexuality. It's a waste of your time and can be construed as hostile. I'd advise you to read statistics on domestic abuse before you decide it's safer for a woman to be in love with a man.

    And hondurena wants gays and lesbians separated? Because they're like prisoners?

    GLBTNurse, sounds like a great idea.

    Medicrnohio, I'm sorry about the discrimination you are facing.

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