frustration over nursing shortage

  1. You would think that with the increasing nursing shortage being in the news here lately that something more would be done to encourage those wanting to go into the field. I have been wanting to return to nursing school for several years now, but am limited financially. I have a family and bills to pay. All the scholarship programs are geared towards high school seniors, not "nontraditional students" such as myself (32 years old). Calling the local hospitals to inquire about any programs they might have was a waste of time. They acted like they didn't understand what I was talking about when I asked if they had any scholarship or internship programs for RN students. One told me they had a program, but you had to have finished your first clinical rotation before you would be eligible. That leaves me out. I apologize for dumping all this on you all, but I am really frustrated and needed to vent.
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   P_RN
    I totally agree. Somewhere in congress there was talk of a program sort of like the Peace Corps....that would repay your obligation if you worked for some length of time as a nurse.

    Coming up with the initial money is VERY hard!!

    How much nursing school have you already done?

    I suppose military is out? Could you afford maybe one course at a time? I wish I had better answers.
  4. by   SlinkRN
    Have you looked into your community college? They usually have an associate degree program that is geared for more mature students. I went to my community college when I decided to become a nurse in my 30's and I am LOVING my new profession. Getting through a nursing program with a husband and 4 kids to keep track of was tough - but worth it!
  5. by   SlinkRN
    PS: Community college is extremely affordable too!
  6. by   huckfinn
    tlt,
    You didn't post your job. Many hospitals have scholarship programs for CNAs.
  7. by   Sylvia
    Are there any vocational/technical schools where you live? They are generally very affordable and you usually get excellent training there.

    There was no way I could have afforded even a community college so I went to a vocational/technical school and got my LPN training. Then, when I became an LPN and started making a little money, I was able to afford to get my RN training.

    Sylvia
  8. by   spudflake
    If you're willing to move - try Nevada and California. Both areas are HURTING. Nevada is #1 for having the least nurses per population Calif is #2. I'd try Nevada because it's a nice place to live. Elko is opening a new hospital expanding to 75 beds. Yes Nevada is a huge state with all the people in the south. (look at the map HA) There are LOTS of jobs that can fit ANY student schedule and earn enough money for school. Comm. College is the cheapest Las Vegas is the pits - avoid at all cost. Reno is nice and the skiing is so close and absolutely wonderful The weather is great and the people are very friendly and helpful. Close community. The nuts are unfortunately crosssing in from the west.
  9. by   tonchitoRN
    Where there is a will there is a way. There are always student loans. I was in debt for many years but now my loans are paid off. I look at the loans as an investment. The payoff is immediately when you graduate. Better odds than the stock market. Good luck.
  10. by   frustratedRN
    i attended a community college. at first i got a few grants here and there. it was enough to pay for books at least. but once they saw my grades the grants increased. by the time i graduated i was paying for nothing. i worked damn hard tho. and i was raising four kids and working as CNA at the time.

    another thing you might try is those hospitals that have nursing schools. they are more likely to have programs like what you are looking for. careful tho cos you will prob have to sign on for a long amount of time.

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