Four years for an associates? - page 4

So this is my first year in college, and I signed up for general ed classes at my local community college. In the middle of the semester, I decided I wanted to be a nurse, but unfortunately I didn't... Read More

  1. by   marilynmom
    I think you should get your BSN.

    When I went to the CC I paid about $1500 a semester. I'm now about to graduate from my state university with a BSN and my tuition has been $1800 a semester. Books at both have been about the same each semester.

    If your goal is to get a BSN and go on for further education you should just get the BSN to begin with. I know way to many ADN nurses who have went back to school for their BSN and they are stressed out to the max with working full time and going to school even part time.
  2. by   nurse2b2010
    Quote from AnnieMc
    So this is my first year in college, and I signed up for general ed classes at my local community college. In the middle of the semester, I decided I wanted to be a nurse, but unfortunately I didn't take Chemistry or anything this current semester!

    Because of Anatomy 1 & 2, I'll be stuck until next winter. (Since nursing app req/deadlines are due May 1st this year, and they only offer nursing school that starts in the fall.) So basically, it'll take me 4 years just to get an associates! Has this happened to any of you? I mean, next year, I'll only really need to take Anatomy 1 & 2, so that'd be 4 credits a semester, but my dad wants me to go fulltime to be on his insurance. Does anyone know if there's a way to be 'dual enrolled?' For example, can I start nursing school even though it requires me to have completed Anatomy?
    Annie, I think it really depends on the school you are in and what their policies are. Me -- for instance, I am a pre-nursing student, and I will have all my pre-requisites done by the end of this current semester so that I can apply for nursing school in Fall 08. I have already applied. But my point is I have all my pre-reqs done so next semester I am taking just filler classes so that I can receive my full financial aid. One of the classes I am taking is speech which is part of our nursing program (I think it's in the second semester), but they are allowing me to take it this coming spring. I am taking Anatomy l & ll this summer which is required in the first semester of nursing school. My best advice is to talk to your nursing advisor. She'll guide you in the right direction! Good luck!
  3. by   marilynmom
    Quote from LuckyMe2g
    You have to ask yourself...are many people really getting their BSN in only four years? I honestly don't know,
    The vast majority of my classmates in my BSN program get their degree within 4 years, or 4.5 at the most. My school puts out it's stats every year or so and the majority of students actually do get their degrees (in whatever field) within 4 years.
  4. by   nurse2b2010
    That is why it's very important to research the school and degree program that you are interested in. As for me, I will have a degree in liberal arts in general studies as well as my ASN, and I plan on transferring to a 4-year institution to get my BSN after working for a year as an RN. So, I will have my ASN in 3 years as well as my liberal arts transfer degree. Yes, it can be a racket!
  5. by   LeavingTeaching4RN
    Quote from llg
    The desired standard for higher education in the United States (all disciplines, not just nursing) is 4 years of full time study for a Bachelor's Degrees. That's why athletes have only 4 years of competition eligibility and standard undergraduate scholarships are only 4 years. Colleges and Universities track their statistics on both graduation rate and time and get concerned when too many people are taking longer than 4 years. Results are published in surveys, etc. and become a source of embarrassment and controversy for the school when they can't produce a 4-year graduate. Of course, some people do take longer for a wide variety of reasons ... but, the desired standard is 4 years or 8 semesters of full time study.
    Actually, athletes have a 5 year scholarship eligibility from the NCAA. They can red shirt their freshman year. Then, they have four years of eligibility remaining.

    I think that each person has to research the programs they're interested in and make an informed decision.

    Buyer Beware: If a students enters a program without a realistic program plan and graduation date, shame on them.
  6. by   nurse2b2010
    Yes, you're right, we should all be smart enough to research the direction we want to go!
  7. by   jla623
    I wouldn't feel too bad....I will graduate with two associates degrees and it will have taken me 7 years.....Two associates equals a bachelors degree right???? haha
  8. by   jackson145
    I'm working towards my ASN. I've had 6 semesters of GenEd (part-time) and will have 4 semesters of NS.
  9. by   nurse2b2010
    I think the real important thing to remember is not how long the journey is, but that you finish or finished your journey! Good luck to everyone!
  10. by   llg
    Quote from LeavingTeaching4RN
    Actually, athletes have a 5 year scholarship eligibility from the NCAA. They can red shirt their freshman year. Then, they have four years of eligibility remaining.

    I think that each person has to research the programs they're interested in and make an informed decision.

    Buyer Beware: If a students enters a program without a realistic program plan and graduation date, shame on them.
    Yes, athletes can be red-shirted a year ... but they can only play for 4 years. That's because a college career is "supposed" to take 4 years.
  11. by   LeavingTeaching4RN
    llg, you're right. BS should take 4 years. My BS took 4 years with the mandatory summer session. Again, it is our responsibility to know what is required for any course of study.


    However, if I would have known then what I know now, I would have hung around a few extra semesters. I had a great undergrad experience. GO SEMINOLES!
  12. by   sleika
    I, too, think the BSN is the best way to go. I was originally a psychology major (3 yrs completed) who finally decided to go back to school, but this time for nursing. I realized today that I have enough credits done to actually be done with a BSN in the same amount of time as it would take to get my ADN. Ha!
    I hadn't looked into this before b/c I thought it would take longer. But, it's better. Plus, I hear you can do it part time if you want. I keep hearing how hard it is to get into the ADN program at my cc, so hard that if you don't have a 4.0 on the pre-reqs you don't really stand a chance. The BSN program will accept 3.0.
    In the end, considering the career advantages I think it's definitely worth it.
  13. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from laurainri
    when you go to a CC they do not tell you how long the wait list is. It took me 5 years to complete my ADN. Sad huh. If I had known I would have transferred to a BSN.

    Me, too. Five years and 127 credit hours= ADN for me.

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