Forcing nurses to work as aides - page 3

I have a question for you all. My employer (LTC facility) has hired and scheduled too many nurses on my shift. This means one person usually has to float, which is fine. Unfortunately they have... Read More

  1. by   cjkes78
    I just finished Funds 1 in PN school. We didn't actually learn some of the things that are taught in CNA classes. For example: we didn't learn how to put a "brief" on a patient, we didn't learn how to put on those hose (ted hose?), we didn't learn how to operate lifts, and I know there is more that I can't remember.

    When I took my CNA class a few years ago, we were taught those things and we actually had to get in the lifts to know how the patient would feel.

    Some of the skills that we were't taught in Funds 1 are skills that are on the state board test for NAs. One of my skills for the state board test was putting on those hose. Now, its not like its a complicated task, but those things are hard as H*** to put on and I don't think that if I hadn't been taught and had the practice before that I would have passed that skill, especially since the state wants it done a certain way.

    Anyway, sorry to get off the topic but this thread made me wander if there are other nursing schools that don't teach students what a CNA learns in their class?

    BTW: We did learn some basic skills: transfers, oral care, TPR, BP, bed making, bed baths, peri care, etc., but it was no where near as thorough as the basic skills I learned in my CNA class.
    Last edit by cjkes78 on Dec 23, '04
  2. by   mattsmom81
    My nursing program started us out with CNA skills...and then we were given the opportunity to work for pay (if we chose to) during our student years. But this was a now defunct hospital based diploma program...I don't know how it is done today.

    Those who haven't done CNA work, or have never watched what they must do for am cares in LTC obviously don't KNOW how hard it IS. It is a skillful art involving hard physical work...with the CNA's working together like a well oiled machine to get all these totally dependent folks up, cleaned, and going for the day. I sure would NOT want to 'step into' that new role during MY pregnancy.
  3. by   MtnMan
    Perhaps spending a little time with the lowly aides and finding out what they do besides take breaks would be in everyones best interest. Since you are held responsible if they screw up I should think you would want to know what thry do. In the Marine Corps everyone knows as much about each others job as possible. They do it in case of mortality but I believe it applies to any workplace as a sort of healthy checks and balances.
  4. by   CoffeeRTC
    I work in LTC as an RN...started as a CNA while in nursing school for my BSN. I took the job as a CNA while in my second year in order to learn pt care and get a step ahead in nursing school. Let me tell you this helped! If it wasn't for that CNA experience I would have never really learned basic care.
    Getting back to the OP...your facility should have trained you on lifts etc. Once you get the basic inservice (should only take less than 8hrs) you should be good to go. Now weather you should have to work as a CNA...different story.!
  5. by   emeraldjay
    Quote from michelle126
    I work in LTC as an RN...started as a CNA while in nursing school for my BSN. I took the job as a CNA while in my second year in order to learn pt care and get a step ahead in nursing school. Let me tell you this helped! If it wasn't for that CNA experience I would have never really learned basic care.
    Getting back to the OP...your facility should have trained you on lifts etc. Once you get the basic inservice (should only take less than 8hrs) you should be good to go. Now whether you should have to work as a CNA...different story.!
    I think most prospective nurses should work as CNAs before jumping in to nursing school. I had always believed that the first thing taught after handwashing is pt care. Apparently this is not the case anymore, beyond cleaning. Scares me to think that NYS still allows someone who has gone through at least one year of RN or LPN school is allowed to take the written and practical for NYS Nurse Aide.

    The frightening part is that an ER nurse does a lot of aide work, unless they have aides for that. I didn't see any aides in the ER where I did my time for EMT, my preceptors joked about putting me on code brown duty but they all knew I wasn't even taught how to place a bedpan.

    I don't believe anyone should be thrown to the wolves without proper training in using the lifts. Any LTC facility that believes in "learn as you go" for nurses is just asking for a mountain of incident reports. I also believe that anyone on "light duty" should be limited to feeding and taking vitals. A pregnant woman's body is under enough strain being pregnant, it doesn't need anymore added by lifting pts or moving lifts and med carts.
  6. by   Hairstylingnurse
    Quote from findingmywayRN
    Thanks for your responses. I sense that the impression of my post was that I do not want to "work as an aide." This is not the case. My concern is that I have not been trained on the equiptment they use on a regular basis, which I am expected to just learn as I go, combined with the physical demands of the job and my limitations. I have told my boss this and she said the nurses should all be trained on this equiptment, but there has not been any training provided so far. Just to make myself clear, I do know basic nursing care, how how to wash residents, take vitals, etc. I do not, however, know how to use a shower chair, or how to transfer a resident into or out of the tub/shower, using lifts, etc. and this worries me about liability as pointed out by nursemaa.

    chris_at_lucas_RN I agree it is important to always ask for help, which I always do.
    Findingmyway, there would be nothing wrong with it even if you didn't want to do cna work. I for one don't want to do it. I'm much more comfortable in my LPN skin so to speak. I'm terribly uncoordinated and not nearly as efficent as an cna. I worked as a cna for 6 weeks while I waited for my nclex results and was horrilble at it.The other cna's were always trying to help me catch up:uhoh21: and I'm as hyper as hell. I've been ADD all my life. I don't want to do cna work and I respect the h#$$ out of the good cna's( they should be paid more) and I know plenty of cna's tHAT SAY THEY WOULD NEVER GO BACK FOR THIER LPN OR RN, BECAUSE THEY WOULDN'T WANT MY JOB FOR ANYTHING. So each to his own.

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