For The Love Of All That Is Holy . . . . For The Love Of All That Is Holy . . . . - pg.3 | allnurses

For The Love Of All That Is Holy . . . . - page 3

"PT" means Physical Therapist. If you cannot bring yourself to type out "patient", the correct abbreviation is "pt". It's LOSE your license, not "loose" your license. I've seen this one so often... Read More

  1. Visit  purplegal profile page
    #26 8
    Might as well add these common, but annoying mistakes:

    To/two/too

    There/they're/their/there's/theirs

    Your/you're
  2. Visit  sevensonnets profile page
    #27 9
    All that purplegal! And don't get me started on people trying to rehome there cat's and dog's on Craigslist.
  3. Visit  BCgradnurse profile page
    #28 7
    The improper use of the apostrophe drives me crazy. The use of "loose" instead of "lose" is a close second.

    I also use a broom to chase those darn kids off my lawn!!!
  4. Visit  TriciaJ profile page
    #29 8
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    How about "tow the line"? I read that one in a newspaper! (OK, it was the online version of a newspaper, but really!) It is "toe the line." As in having our toes on the line.
    Our local rag is notorious for crap like this. I can't get through a single issue without my teeth being on edge. Luckily, there's not usually enough of it to even wrap a single fish.
  5. Visit  TriciaJ profile page
    Quote from BCgradnurse
    The improper use of the apostrophe drives me crazy. The use of "loose" instead of "lose" is a close second.

    I also use a broom to chase those darn kids off my lawn!!!
    If that doesn't work, I fly around on it. That scatters them!
    Last edit by TriciaJ on Jan 8 : Reason: typo
  6. Visit  Ruby Vee profile page
    #31 6
    Quote from TriciaJ
    If that doesn't work, I fly around on it. The scatters them!
    Beverage alert!
  7. Visit  BeachNurse3484 profile page
    #32 6
    Quote from BCgradnurse
    The improper use of the apostrophe drives me crazy. The use of "loose" instead of "lose" is a close second.

    I also use a broom to chase those darn kids off my lawn!!!
    I'm friends with a girl on FB that never uses the possessive form for her children. As in "I went to Sarah school today". It drives me up a wall, and takes every shred of restraint to not comment on it.
  8. Visit  NICUismylife profile page
    "for all intensive purposes..."

    OMG! I want to claw my eyes out whenever I see it. It's "for all intents and purposes," people!
  9. Visit  Horseshoe profile page
    #34 2
    Quote from BeachNurse3484
    I'm friends with a girl on FB that never uses the possessive form for her children. As in "I went to Sarah school today". It drives me up a wall, and takes every shred of restraint to not comment on it.
    Lol, I've never seen anyone do that. Strange...
  10. Visit  blondy2061h profile page
    Quote from NICUismylife
    "for all intensive purposes..."

    OMG! I want to claw my eyes out whenever I see it. It's "for all intents and purposes," people!
    Unless you're drawing an abg for all intensivists' purposes.
  11. Visit  Tomascz profile page
    #36 3
    "Tow the line" or tow that line, dates back to a time when barges were towed by a bunch of guys on a rope or tow line. It was nasty and hard and didn't pay worth a crap; kind of like nursing.
  12. Visit  amoLucia profile page
    #37 2
    cite/site/sight

    There are exceptions to the apostrophe use - its is the possessive (without the apostrophe) while it's is the contraction for 'it is'.

    And if the word ends in an 's', one only uses an apostrophe, like Moses' tablet to show possession.

    Also the use of IRregardless. It used to be no such word as irregardless. However I do think the official 'grammar police' have softened on this, altho my spellchecker is still catching its use.
    Last edit by amoLucia on Jan 8 : Reason: correction
  13. Visit  Horseshoe profile page
    #38 5
    Quote from Tomascz
    "Tow the line" or tow that line, dates back to a time when barges were towed by a bunch of guys on a rope or tow line. It was nasty and hard and didn't pay worth a crap; kind of like nursing.

    Origin:

    There is some confusion between 'toe the line' and the frequently seen misspelling 'tow the line'. The 'tow' version is no doubt encouraged by the fact that ropes or cables on ships are often called lines and that 'tow lines' are commonplace nautical items.
    The earlier meaning of 'to toe the line' was to position one's toes next to a marked line in order to be ready to start a race, or some other undertaking. In the 19th century, we wouldn't have been limited to lines when it came to placing our feet, but would have had a choice of what to toe - a mark, scratch, crack or trig [a line or small trench]. These were all then in use in 'toe the ...' phrases. The earliest version we know about is from The Diverting History of John Bull and Brother Jonathan, 1813, by 'Hector Bull-Us' - known to his family and friends as James Paulding:
    "He began to think it was high time to toe the mark."

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