For the family and patient (long) - page 2

Yesterday, they flew in a 20 year old mother who had been in an MVA, had not been wearing a seatbelt and was ejected through the windshield of the car in which she was a passenger. She was brought... Read More

  1. by   LesJenRN
    Thank You for sharing that.
    As an ICU nurse, I often feel that one of the most important aspects of my job is helping people die with comfort and dignity...
  2. by   Spidey's mom
    Thank you.

    steph
  3. by   missmercy
    Thanks!! You did a beautiful thing for that family, for your helper, for us all!Thank you for sharing the experience! (and I am going to use it in my orientation -- if it is OK with you!)
  4. by   Ahhphoey
    Thanks for that reminder. You never truly know if when you walk out the door to go anywhere, if you will return. We must cherish and love those close to us and let them know how we feel about them before it is too late.
  5. by   moon-glow
    wonderful story. I guess that is what nurse is about. sympathy, empathy and compassion. Life, family is wonderful and precious.
    :kiss
  6. by   FranEMTnurse
    And by the way orrnlori,
    Your experience and message should be submitted as a manuscript to the Nursing 2004 magazine. They look for articles such as that, and yours is an excellent one. In my opinion, it would win first prize.
  7. by   RedSox33RN
    Thank you, Lori, for sharing such a touching experience. I think not only you got a lot out of it, and the family, but we did as well.

    I think submitting that to a nursing journal is a wonderful idea. That is in some respects, exactly what nursing is all about. Not just the patient, but the patient as a real person with a family and friends and a life they've left behind.

    Thanks again for taking the time to share.
  8. by   orrnlori
    Thanks for your kind replies. I think of myself as a crusty sort. I've seen so much in just the last 6 years being a nurse in the operating room that I've become immune to much of it. It is pretty easy to lose your humanity after so many cases and so many non-compliant patients and so many tragic stories. It gets easier to refer to the patient by their procedure rather than their name and I do get so exasperated with patients sometimes. Being in the OR takes you away from the direct patient care that is so vital to bedside nursing, I do love it though and the only other thing in nursing I'd like to do is teach.

    This situation just so moved me. There were other people coming in and out of the room while we worked on this young lady that day, other nurses, the PACU manager, etc. So much of what we did was unspoken and nearly telepathic. I couldn't help but think differently this time. She was so young, they were only making a quick trip I would assume. Their children were in the back seat restrained in child seats and I believe were not seriously harmed but I don't know. So much of the time, we only get snippets in the OR of what happened. We didn't even have a name for her until the very end as we were helping to prepare her for her family, she was just listed as 'beta female' or something like that I believe during the surgical interventions. I know the surgeons and nurses did their best. I know I did my best. I know there was a reason this happened but I will never know what it was or how it could possibly benefit anyone. These are the things that make it harder.

    Again, thanks for taking the time to reply. I felt better just writing it out, it reminded me most vividly that our time here is so limited and to make the best we can from what were are handed.
  9. by   FranEMTnurse
    orrnurse, It definitely was a benefit to you. Just thing about how it reoriented your way of thinking. We can all too easily fall into the habit of dehumanization, and it isn't just in OR nursing. I'm sure the ER nurses would agree. I was an EMT and a leader in my ambulance corps for many years. I answered so many calls, (including several taxi calls, you know, the cry wolf kind?) I saw my own self becoming hardened to it. It can easily happen to anyone. I did the thing I know how to do best after that. I backed off, but did keep my EMT and my CPR instructor certifications. They were a valuable asset when I went to nursing school.
    Quote from orrnlori
    Thanks for your kind replies. I think of myself as a crusty sort. I've seen so much in just the last 6 years being a nurse in the operating room that I've become immune to much of it. It is pretty easy to lose your humanity after so many cases and so many non-compliant patients and so many tragic stories. It gets easier to refer to the patient by their procedure rather than their name and I do get so exasperated with patients sometimes. Being in the OR takes you away from the direct patient care that is so vital to bedside nursing, I do love it though and the only other thing in nursing I'd like to do is teach.

    This situation just so moved me. There were other people coming in and out of the room while we worked on this young lady that day, other nurses, the PACU manager, etc. So much of what we did was unspoken and nearly telepathic. I couldn't help but think differently this time. She was so young, they were only making a quick trip I would assume. Their children were in the back seat restrained in child seats and I believe were not seriously harmed but I don't know. So much of the time, we only get snippets in the OR of what happened. We didn't even have a name for her until the very end as we were helping to prepare her for her family, she was just listed as 'beta female' or something like that I believe during the surgical interventions. I know the surgeons and nurses did their best. I know I did my best. I know there was a reason this happened but I will never know what it was or how it could possibly benefit anyone. These are the things that make it harder.

    Again, thanks for taking the time to reply. I felt better just writing it out, it reminded me most vividly that our time here is so limited and to make the best we can from what were are handed.
  10. by   BabyRN2Be
    Wow, I'm teary-eyed now. Thank you for sharing your story. The family was so lucky to have someone to care of her, to take the time like you did.
  11. by   Noney
    Thanks,

    Noney
  12. by   seanymph
    (((((orrnlori))))). I just pray there was a nurse as wonderful and caring as you who took care of my husband when I lost him in very similar circumstances. Your story brought tears to my eyes and healing to me. God Bless you.
  13. by   Rustyhammer
    Every once in awhile I get touched by what I read here.
    This is one of those times. I want to thank you for sharing something that we can all relate to. It's not always easy doing the things we do and even though that family was not in the frame of mind to appreciate what you did, you certainly made it easier for them.
    Thanks again.
    -Russell

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