flunking out of nursing school - page 2

Well, today it happened, I flunked my 4th and last test before the final exam for Mother Baby/Peds. I am so lost right now, that I do not know what to do. I quit my fulltime job, I have neglected my... Read More

  1. by   ASSEDO
    Another suggestion, if the college or nursing school has members on the board from your district meet with him/her and complain to them, and ask for his/her help in getting you back in class. You may find yourself right back in class. In some areas, districts donate money to college and a board member may have a some power: Mess with someone in my district and your college may be out of funds! It happened to some nurse students in my district. Guess, what, the board member called and told them to go back to class, and NO Questions will be asked.

    Nursing schools are known for their abuse. When I went to class on the first day there were 32 in my class. The nursing director go up and stated "1/2 of you in this class will not gradutate. We graduated with 16. She was right.

    Fight for yourself kiddo, no one else will.
    Last edit by ASSEDO on Nov 17, '07
  2. by   illbeanurse
    Quote from Agnus
    This probable is not much comfort but those of us who have been where you are. (I am one) actually found that time (8 months in my case)off from school were actually a blessing. Unlike you I needed an attitude adjustment and this provided not only that but a wonderful chance to explore nursing from a different perspective and time away from something I was tired of, school.

    When I was allowed to come back in Aug. (I had to reapply with no guarentee) I became the number one student in that class. I thought I had studied hard before now I really was because of what I had learned working those 8 months. I understood what it was I did not know.
    You are absolutely right!!

    I plan on buckling down and studying the entire time I am off. I will not over do it, but do a little at a time to make sure that I am learning something while I am off.

    I think my lesson here as well is to learn how to study more effectively and I know the school can help me with that.

    I look forward to being the #1 in my class too, just like you did.

    Thanks
  3. by   illbeanurse
    Quote from Emmanuel Goldstein
    I was accepted into a diploma program back in '79-80. The school prided itself on its tough, bad-ass reputation. The instructors made it clear from day one that they did NOT like having married students, or those who were parents because they wanted your FULL attention focused on them. And they also HATED those who refused to live in the dorm (attached to the hospital). These people (instructors, etc.) were--- to put it kindly--- psycho.

    They did their damndest to drum out those who didn't live in the dorm (and a few who did live there--- the *gasp* divorced students), and they were not subtle about it either. They controlled every aspect of the lives of those who lived in the dorm, down to opening their mail and stapling it back before distributing it (told ya, they were not subtle).

    Anywho, I managed to do pretty good in class and clinicals, and it really ticked them off. (I was the trifecta in their eyes: married, kid, lived off site) They did everything they could to trip me up, but to no avail.

    Until.

    One of their rules was anything below a C was automatic expulsion from the program, no ifs, no ands, no buts, no appeal. Period. And you never came back. We took our non-nursing reqs at one of two local colleges. I picked the wrong one =\. Did great in all classes, until the final exam in micro. The exam consisted of TWO essay questions. Get one wrong, get an F. And of course, I missed one.

    I didn't even know what my grade was on the final when I was asked to come to the school director's office. They told me I failed and that I was out. I simply said, "Ok" because I wasn't really surprised I'd failed that exam. One of the younger, snarkier instructors got within inches of my face and smirked, "Face it little girl. You will NEVER be a nurse."

    I never forgot that moment.

    Fast forward a few years. Now divorced, another kid, made it through LPN school at the top of my class, took Boards and scored a perfect 800. Worked my way through RN school, 4.0 average, took my Boards, scored 12 points shy of perfect (2388? 2288? can't remember what the max possible was). This isn't because I'm some great shakes or anything, I just test well.

    But I had GREAT satisfaction sending my photo with copies of both Board results and both schools' transcripts to my old diploma school (attention to the hag who'd gotten in my face) with the comment, "WANNA BET?"

    I absolutely love it!!!!!!!

    Now that is the most motivation I have gotten all day and I love you for it.

    God bless you for the story. I feel that much stronger about fighting my way through to become a nurse!

    Thanks
  4. by   nurz2be
    Quote from illbeanurse
    You are absolutely right!!

    I plan on buckling down and studying the entire time I am off. I will not over do it, but do a little at a time to make sure that I am learning something while I am off.

    I think my lesson here as well is to learn how to study more effectively and I know the school can help me with that.

    I look forward to being the #1 in my class too, just like you did.

    Thanks
    One other thing I would suggest is that IF you plan on reapplying to this particular school, I WOULD NOT go to the school causing wrinkles by bad talking to ANY administration about the nursing instructors. If you are not guaranteed a spot when you reapply, don't give them an excuse to pass you by. If you do as I and others suggest and meet with a study group who is still in the program I would ask them or an individual in that group, once it gets closer to time for you to reapply, to write you a letter of recommendation about how you continued to apply yourself and were intent on learning in or out of the program. This should grab them by the horns and make them pay attention. Be what they assume you will not be, SUCCESSFUL. Show them you have no hard feelings and that you used your time off to excel forward. GOOD LUCK TO YOU.

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