Family Member Watching Pro-terror/ Anti-America/ Anti-Semitic video - page 2

Would love to know your thoughts. A coworker was stunned to go into a room and find a parent watching an pro-terrorism, anti-America, anti-Semitic video. Allegedly, it was calling for the... Read More

  1. by   sugarmagnolia3
    Quote from MunoRN
    What you're describing could easily apply to the media sources a large portion of the population utilizes, are you saying it would be reasonable for us to investigate all of these people for criminal charges?
    Good point.
  2. by   sugarmagnolia3
    Quote from chare
    Regardless of whether you agree with it, or what you think of it, the family can watch whatever they wish. And no, it's not abuse.

    It always amazes me how much we, as a society agree with and support free speech; as long as we agree with what is being said.
    Look, I totally support free speech. Hate whomever you want, and speak about it publicly, that is your 1st amendment right. However, is it not a crime to encourage violence and destruction against individuals or groups people? And I guess I just feel a little "not right" about a parent listening to it in front of a child.
  3. by   KatieMI
    Quote from sugarmagnolia3
    You were in situations more than once, where you walked in to find a parent watching terror videos, encouraging violence in front of a minor child? So you didn't feel safe, but were not concerned about the safety of the patient? I'm not sure if you read my actual post.
    They can do whatever they like according to the First Amendment of the Constitution of the USA. They cannot DO anything along the line, but they can think, read and watch. And I would leave alone the content of video games so many people play in front of minor children.

    My situations were, for one example, family member with swastika tattoos watching anti-Semitic video in room (with no minor kids around, but I guess he would do just the same). I left the room and told the manager that if she would force me, a Jew, care for this patient, I would refuse it and let the chips fall where they might. She listened
  4. by   sugarmagnolia3
    Quote from KatieMI
    They can do whatever they like according to the First Amendment of the Constitution of the USA. They cannot DO anything along the line, but they can think, read and watch. And I would leave alone the content of video games so many people play in front of minor children.

    My situations were, for one example, family member with swastika tattoos watching anti-Semitic video in room (with no minor kids around, but I guess he would do just the same). I left the room and told the manager that if she would force me, a Jew, care for this patient, I would refuse it and let the chips fall where they might. She listened
    I agree with you, but I just think there is a difference between animated violent video games, and an actual person encouraging actual violence against an actual specific person or specific group of people. I am going to research, but I don't believe this type of speech is actually constitutionally protected.
  5. by   OldDude
    So...how would one feel if, in the spirit of not wanting to "judge" anyone, you didn't report what you saw and this same parent was arrested for placing a pressure cooker bomb that exploded in a Jewish day care center? Like I say, see something, say something...let the experts do the "judging."
  6. by   psu_213
    Quote from sugarmagnolia3
    And I guess I just feel a little "not right" about a parent listening to it in front of a child.
    I would feel "not right" about it too...especially if the parent is trying to indoctrinate his/her child. However, I really don't see how this rises to the level of abuse. There are lots of less then ideal things parents do (I wish I could turn in parents who let their toddler kids play on the floor of the ED rooms), but it requires something more than "a little not right" before we can report a parent for abuse.

    As for speech encouraging violence...there is no law against listening to this. There is something like that on the nightly news regularly. It may leave a bad taste in your mouth to hear it, but you can't turn someone in for listening.
  7. by   sugarmagnolia3
    Quote from psu_213
    I would feel "not right" about it too...especially if the parent is trying to indoctrinate his/her child. However, I really don't see how this rises to the level of abuse. There are lots of less then ideal things parents do (I wish I could turn in parents who let their toddler kids play on the floor of the ED rooms), but it requires something more than "a little not right" before we can report a parent for abuse.

    As for speech encouraging violence...there is no law against listening to this. There is something like that on the nightly news regularly. It may leave a bad taste in your mouth to hear it, but you can't turn someone in for listening.
    You're right, I believe it is against the law to actually encourage or threaten violence, but it is not against the law to listen. I think it is subjective on whether it is emotionally abusive or not to subject children to it.
  8. by   psu_213
    Quote from OldDude
    So...how would one feel if, in the spirit of not wanting to "judge" anyone, you didn't report what you saw and this same parent was arrested for placing a pressure cooker bomb that exploded in a Jewish day care center? Like I say, see something, say something...let the experts do the "judging."
    So let's take the child out of the picture for a minute. You walk into a patient's room, and he/she is watching a video on their personal device. You hear anti-Semitic phrases being used in the video and the "You Tuber" is advocating violence towards Jews. Do you report that? I understand see something, say something, and if the patient were the one talking about committing violent acts towards Jews, etc., then, yes say something. I don't think you can report them just for watching something.
  9. by   quiltynurse56
    Since the parents were watching this with the child in the room, I am going to guess they watch these kinds of things at home too. Probably the family culture. While we may disagree with it, are we the ones to police other families culture?

    What they find appropriate for their family is not what I would find appropriate for my family. In this day and age, there is a wide range of views. Many of which I do not agree with.

    If they were watching this and there was a roommate situation, then the appropriateness of it would have to be discussed with them.
  10. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from OldDude
    So...how would one feel if, in the spirit of not wanting to "judge" anyone, you didn't report what you saw and this same parent was arrested for placing a pressure cooker bomb that exploded in a Jewish day care center? Like I say, see something, say something...let the experts do the "judging."
    That's an overreaction and ties up resources that could be better utilized, IMO. I don't report people watching violent scenes on television because I'm afraid they might decide to murder someone. It's just a TV.
    More concerning is what happens out of plain site. Most people with sinister plans don't make an effort to advertise them ahead of time.
  11. by   Emergent
    You can always get the family's name and contact the FBI or the homeland security people. It's up to citizens to be alert.

    Sadly the officials dropped the ball on that recent Florida shooter, but I'm sure citizen reports have also saved lives many times.
  12. by   SpankedInPittsburgh
    Yeah people are entitled to their beliefs no matter how bat-poop crazy they are. Unfortunately the fruit often doesn't fall far from the tree for a good reason as the young are socialized into whack-a-doo land. This is disturbing and distasteful but not illegal and probably not child abuse. Very sad situation indeed but honestly so long as people are entitled to freedom of expression and thoughts I don't know if there is much to be done about it.
  13. by   klone
    Quote from psu_213
    I would feel "not right" about it too...especially if the parent is trying to indoctrinate his/her child. However, I really don't see how this rises to the level of abuse. There are lots of less then ideal things parents do (I wish I could turn in parents who let their toddler kids play on the floor of the ED rooms), but it requires something more than "a little not right" before we can report a parent for abuse..
    Yes. I'm sure many pro-life Christians might consider it abusive if parents took their child to a Planned Parenthood or pro-choice/pro-abortion rally.

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