Extreme Measures

  1. Just wondering from all of you night shift folk, if you have done anything extreme to make your sleeping room dark/quiet, etc. I have read the posts on sleeping after night shift - but I need the room extra dark & quiet. My husband calls me a vampire. (That's it, a coffin!) I will be starting graves soon so any advice would be great!!!
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  2. 15 Comments

  3. by   defib queen
    A DARK ROOM, (THICK DRAPES, GARBAGE BAGS OVER WINDOWS, WHATEVER IT TAKES) AND COOL AIR VIA AIR CONDITIONER IN THE SUMMER OR CUTTING OF MOST OF THE HEAT IN MY ROOM IN THE WINTER WITH LOTS OF COVERS. THAT IS HOW I DID IT FOR 3 YEARS. THEN I WENT TO DAYSHIFT. ALTHOUGH I USUALLY LEFT THE TV OR RADIO ON LOW FOR SOME NOISE, I FOUND IT EASIER TO SLEEP WITH SOME KIND OF NOISE THAN TOTAL QUIET. I TEND TO THINK TO MUCH ABOUT THE NIGHT BEFORE, WHAT I DID OR DIDN'T GET DONE IF IT WAS TO QUIET. MOSTLY, GIVE YOURSELF SOME TIME BEFORE GOING STRAIGHT TO BED TO COME DOWN. FOR ME IT WAS THE HOUR DRIVE HOME BY MYSELF, BY THE TIME I GOT HOME I WAS READY TO SLEEP. GOOD LUCK!
  4. by   Sleepyeyes
    I use earplugs and a face mask.
    There were a few other threads about this with some very useful info,
    such as TV "white noise" to help me relax a little. And someone else suggested Tylenol as a sleep aid, and it does work for me (must take the edge off the achiness).

    Most of all, teach your family to regard your "sleep time" as sacred and inviolate, or they will quickly find themselves living with someone whose sleep-deprived self might not be the best alter ego to be around... :chuckle
  5. by   indynurse
    Dark drapes, turn off the ringer on bedroom phone, Tylenol PM. Always wear sunglasses for the drive home on sunny days. The bright sunlight always seems to wake me up. We have CD music channels on our cable system and I keep one of the easy listening or smooth jazz channels on at a low volume. It's non-stop music without commercials or a deejay reminding you what time it is if you are having trouble falling asleep.
    If you have a large walk-in closet, you may be able to fit a twin bed in there and have a totally dark room to sleep in.
  6. by   Q.
    I took melatonin for a while...not sure if it really helped or if it was all in my head.
  7. by   Pretzlgl
    Thank you guys - I like the walk in closet thing....hmmmm
  8. by   Aussienurse2
    LOL!! Walk into bed room, fall on bed! Now about sleeping through the night...any suggestions?
  9. by   ptnurse
    When my husband started working nights he cut piece of cardboard to fit the windows in the bedroom and taped them in place. Our bedroom window was in the front of the house so I suggested (rather strongly) that he take them down. Them he went to the store and got white spray paint. He sprayed the brown cardboard white and put it back up in the windows. It looked fine, like the white backing on curtains. The bedroom was like a cave even at noon.
  10. by   colleen10
    I was watching a medical show on TLC once and they followed a surgeon throughout his work day. He worked nights and when the end of his shift came it was broad daylight. Before he left the hospital he put on a special pair of goggles that block out most sunlight but you can still where them to drive and walk around outside. I remember him saying that sunlight causes the melatonin in your system to react and causes you stay up. So, if you can not come into contact with daylight you will have a better time sleeping.

    Then, when he first got home he kept the goggles on and tried to keep the whole house as dark as possible. No bright lights either. When it was time for him to actually go to bed they showed him going to sleep on a cot that he had in a walk in closet.
  11. by   Pretzlgl
    I love it! Thank you. ptnurse I like the idea about the white spray paint, aluminum foil just does'nt make a pretty window covering!
  12. by   Annabell
    I have been working nights for 5 years. So far, no problems with sleeping during the day.

    I have a 30 min drive home every morning, and by the time I get home, I am ready for a hot bath and bed. I keep it dark in my room also by using hunter green blinds and curtains. No phone in bedroom. I let the answering machine get it if it rings. My family and friends know I work nights, and usually the only calls I get are from telemarketers. And I don't want to talk to them anyway.

    I find that a box fan helps me sleep better. I even use it in the winter months. It may help you.
  13. by   MRed94
    UH.....I wear hearing aides all the time, so when it is time to sleep, out they come, and bubye world!

    I work all three shifts in no particular order, and have just learned to sleep when I can. With 3 kids, full time job and full time school, not to mention house......sleeping is easy for me. Just finding the time to do so is hard.

  14. by   Q.
    Originally posted by colleen10
    I remember him saying that sunlight causes the melatonin in your system to react and causes you stay up. So, if you can not come into contact with daylight you will have a better time sleeping.

    Yes, it was something like that. Sunlight causes a decrease of melatonin, therefore you stay up. Darkness causes an increase of melatonin. I remember reading that people who are blind and cannot regulate their melatonin levels d/t not being able to see light as well have taken melatonin to help.

    I wish I could remember the source. Damn damn damn.

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