Experienced preceptors

  1. 0
    I could use your advice. We have a new grad on our floor and she is about a month into orientation. She is not going to make it if it keeps going this way. She has given up hope. She has been training with the BEST preceptor on our floor. Problem is, it is clear to me that this preceptor and her don't click personality wise and because of this she is not getting the BEST training even though she is with a great trainer. The preceptor (who I love and is definitely the BEST one on our floor) is sending her off alone to do things she does not feel comfortable doing. She has made a lot of comments about her orientee and I know she does not like her. She declared she was not going to make it after about a week and is no longer trying to train her. She is not spending the time to show her how to do things. She just keeps sending her off to get away from her. It is not working for anyone. I do not normally work this shift, I am just filling in for a few weeks and one day I took the newbie when her preceptor was out. In 12 hours I did not see any red flags. Other than a lack of confidence and wanting to be shown how to do things (which is normal) I think she will be a great nurse. She just needs practice. I think she needs a new preceptor. If she came to my shift I would take her but she can't work nights she has small kids. She said she can't do nights. After working with her that one day I have been watching and her preceptor is NEVER with her which is not normal for this preceptor.

    I am stuck in a place where I see how this is going to end if I don't say or do something, but there is no good way to do this. Should I approach the preceptor and ask her about it? I don't want her to think I am attacking her, but I think she needs to just realize this is not working. I love her to pieces, but I think this trainee needs someone else. I think they would both be happier. Should I talk to the preceptor? Should I talk to the education person on our floor who sets up newbies with their preceptor? Should I ask the new nurse to speak up for herself? I just do not want any hard feelings from anyone. I hate to see someone not make it when they could. I also hate to upset a nurse I enjoy working with who really is USUALLY the best person to train the new nurses. Just a bad match this time.

    Advice?

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  2. 18 Comments...

  3. 6
    PLEASE intervene!!!! ASAP!

    We had a similar situation once, and a change of preceptors was all that was needed. If the current preceptor is a mature adult, they will admit there is a personality issue- and be happy to get the newbie the help needed.
    canoehead, SoldierNurse22, psu_213, and 3 others like this.
  4. 5
    It would be awful if a promising new nurse had her confidence shattered for something like a personality conflict or a misunderstanding. Speak c the preceptor but also speak to the nurse manager, who, believe me, doesn't want her hiring budget to take an unnecessary hit.
  5. 3
    usually the preceptor approaches the nurse educator and states that they think a change is needed. Not everyone is expected to get along with everyone. If you don't feel comfortable saying so to the preceptor, then go the nurse educator. State how your day with the orientee was and your assessment of the situation.

    good luck
    SoldierNurse22, poppycat, and amoLucia like this.
  6. 2
    From personal experience I beg you to intervene and either speak to manager or preceptor directly.
    SoldierNurse22 and beeker like this.
  7. 3
    I hope you intervene. It would be horrible to be in this new orientee's position. Put yourself in her spot and then think wouldn't you want someone to speak up for you???
    nurseladybug12, poppycat, and beeker like this.
  8. 3
    Speak up! I'd try the preceptor first though. Otherwise you can Approach the unit educator to tell them your perspective. Being a new grad is so hard, they need all the kindness and help they can get.
    krazievi3t6url, HouTx, and poppycat like this.
  9. 5
    The preceptor (who I love and is definitely the BEST one on our floor) is sending her off alone to do things she does not feel comfortable doing.

    This statement contradicts itself.

    She declared she was not going to make it after about a week and is no longer trying to train her. She is not spending the time to show her how to do things. She just keeps sending her off to get away from her.

    This doesn't sound like the hallmark of a "BEST" preceptor!

    Even an outstanding preceptor can get worn out of someone with whom they don't click with. But sheesh, if that's the case, then she needs to either go to the nurse manager and tell them to can the orientee or find someone else to work with her. Preferably the latter before canning anyone.
    OCNRN63, wish_me_luck, barnstormin', and 2 others like this.
  10. 6
    Agree with some comments above ... an "excellent" preceptor is not one who just successfuly trains & acclimates other nurses with whom s/he establishes a natural rapport, but someone who demonstrates skills in adult education even when a personal rapport does not flow naturally.
  11. 3
    My suggestion/recommendation would be to go to the third-party Education person and voice concerns; I don't know if the preceptor is the best person to go to first. Sounds like she's detaching already and it may be too difficult for her to remedy the damage done. Something else needs to be done and it may take some real change. And maybe some thinking outside the box.

    Both of these nurses need to be rescued. But for the newbie, it needs to be ASAP (else she'll probably be a new poster here on AN describing her struggles).
    HouTx, SoldierNurse22, and poppycat like this.


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