Excellent article on nursing shortage

  1. Best, most accurate article I've seen on the nursing shortage.

    http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/06241/716999-28.stm

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  2. 16 Comments

  3. by   CaLLaCoDe
    Yes, I agree, an excellent article.
  4. by   EmmaG
    Bringing nurses from abroad, or even educating more nurses here, without addressing the root causes of the nursing shortage, will have the same effect as sticking a finger into a leaky dike. It may help in the short term, but in the long-term, disaster awaits. The focus on the recruitment of nurses from overseas further weakens the collective ability of nurses to seek improvements in working conditions. Emigrants are less likely to challenge employers because of their tenuous residency status. This willingness to accept employment on whatever terms are offered enables employers to place additional demands on the health-care work force which will, in turn, accelerate the departure of domestic nurses from the profession.
    Amen.
  5. by   TheCommuter
    This quote, from the article, hits the nail on the head:
    Despite these numbers, we do not really have a shortage of qualified nurses. What we have is an insufficient number of nurses willing to work under the very difficult working conditions they face in hospitals.
  6. by   CITCAT
    Enjoyed the article and it is very accurate, the majorityof nurses rns are in the 40-50 age grouping and ina survey done by a michigan nurse assoc. the amounts of nurses that are going to retire/relocate by 20012 will be extraodinary, unionization of one hospital improved worker satisfaction,and performance.They forced the hospital to conform and provide safe patient:nurse ratios and acuity. Hats off to Mclaren/Mt. clemens general.
  7. by   Retired R.N.
    Quote from Valerie Salva
    Best, most accurate article I've seen on the nursing shortage.

    http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/06241/716999-28.stm
    One factor that seems to be completely ignored, however, is the fact that we, the taxpayers, are subsidizing some very expensive educational programs for R.N.s that do not adequately prepare the students for the realities of the jobs that await them after graduation. This "elephant in the living room" topic needs to be addressed if we are ever to solve the so-called "shortage of nurses."

    How can we nurses even pretend that we respect the professionalism of our own fellow workers when we are so blind to the working conditions that they face every day of their lives? When studies have shown that driving an automobile when sleep deprived is equally or more dangerous than driving under the influence of alcohol, how can we in good faith approve of mandatory schedules that do not permit nurses to get enough sleep? Since when have the benefits of regular meals become unnecessary for nurses? Should nurses have to consider Depends an accessory to their scrubs? Why do nurses have so little control over the practice of nursing?
  8. by   NRSKarenRN
    BINGO!

    Bringing nurses from abroad, or even educating more nurses here, without addressing the root causes of the nursing shortage, will have the same effect as sticking a finger into a leaky dike. It may help in the short term, but in the long-term, disaster awaits.
  9. by   Diary/Dairy
    Thanks for posting - this is a great article.
  10. by   Minty80
    Thanks! Great article.
  11. by   snowfreeze
    Thanks for posting - great article
  12. by   oramar
    have to get to the bottom of my driveway and get my Post-gazette, it is still there because we have had heavy, heavy rain all night
  13. by   MrsCannibal
    Interesting article, very eye opening (kinda scary!)
  14. by   KeyMaster
    Truely great article! It should be mandatory reading for every manager in every hospital. Our DON bemoans the "critical nursing shortage" in pandering, pretty speeches - then demotes long term staff from supervisory positions because they are "only diploma nurses". We have been told to go back to school for a BSN or MSN or lose the jobs many of us have been doing for years. At least 4 great RN's I know (all with 15 -35 years exp.) have LEFT nursing as a result. How can you cry "Shortage!" then open the door to push experienced staff out? Did I mention this was to help us achieve Magnet status? I'm all for higher education, but doesn't experience count for something? Thanks for letting me vent. I'm going to go look at college options with my daughter now...maybe we can carpool to save $ for tuition....

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