Ex-nurses offered return incentives

  1. From the BBC:

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/2335839.stm

    Once again, it looks as though folks in the UK are ahead of us here in the States, when it comes to nurses. How about it, Don Murray? Is this right?
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   stressedlpn
    wow, At least they are trying to do something postive,
  4. by   oramar
    The longer you are in nursing the more of an activist you become. It is a natural, unavoidable process. In the US the focus is on churning out new nurses. Once a nurse starts to catch on to the abuse and speak up, she or he is labeled a complainer and ejected out of the system. Healthcare managment is just fine with the way things are going. New people are cheaper and more likely to do as they are told, at least for a while they are compliant.
  5. by   UKRNinUSA
    I'm from Scotland and read the article with interest, however I won't be rushing back over there to take up a job which pays a half to a third less than I make over here. The nurses pay over there is a joke! I hope the nurses there strike, which apparently they have been threatening to do. I think it will be the only thing that will make the government finally sit up and take notice.
  6. by   sanakruz
    UKRNinUSA-Why do they call nurses "sister" in the UK? Is it from nuns formerly being hospital staff or is it something else entirely? It always seemed demeaning to me. I'm with Oramar-I have been accused of being "burned out "because I have voiced what I thought was a legitamate complaint....
  7. by   CATHYW
    originally posted by oramar
    the longer you are in nursing the more of an activist you become. it is a natural, unavoidable process. in the us the focus is on churning out new nurses. once a nurse starts to catch on to the abuse and speak up, she or he is labeled a complainer and ejected out of the system. healthcare managment is just fine with the way things are going. new people are cheaper and more likely to do as they are told, at least for a while they are compliant.
    unfortunately, this is too true in many places. instead of listening to the experienced nurses and learning from them, it is cheaper to take on newbies and train them to follow the "party line."
  8. by   nal
    I have been participating in an incentive scheme to encourage nurses to return to the public system. While it is a good idea there are several things I would like to point out. The system is still the same and problems that may have caused you to leave in the first place still remain despite advertising to make it look appealing. I have seen brow beaten nurses currently nursing who are either frustrated with the system, or oblivious to some of the problems as they are so used to dealing with them. I still see low morale, understaffing, poor hourly rates, pressure on younger nurses and university trained nurses, internal bickering and backstabbing, various power tactics, hostility, lack of necessary equipment, inflexibility with family commitments , and the list goes on (we know them all). I still can't help feeling like this is another quick fix (cheaper) solution to the current nursing shortage without dealing with the real issues, and that someone is trying to pocket any unused funding specifically set aside for this purpose.
    why participate you may ask? Well, after three years of study and several years of nursing previously, there were aspects of my work I did not mind and enjoyed. This was an opportunity to return to the profession and due to the shortage and strike action I had hoped there had been improvements to address the above problems I mentioned. If you participate in one of these incentives, have it in writing exactly what it entitles you to and what it covers, I should have done this. Current staff were not prepared for my arrival (afterall they were the ones helping me to refresh my skills) and not all recieved me as a qualified RN with open arms ( I thought they would have been glad to have an extra pair of hands). While this is a good incentive, we are the ice breakers and our feedback will help improve the process for those to follow, and at least it is a positive start. You may also be encouraged to go to those areas who have the biggest staff shortage ( this usually means problems ++).
    I hope you found this insightful and informative.
  9. by   lisamct
    Im a nurse in Scotland and although the 'return to nursing' scheme seems to be quite successful in encouraging non practicing nurse to re-join the NHS they continue to ignore the problem of trying to retain the nurses we they already have. Despite a recent dip we continue to fill student nurse quotas within our universities however the students who actually comlete their course are often only accepting posts within public health or community as the situatoin within our hospitals is so poor. As for our salaries, well, I have 10 years experience, i'm in charge of my own unit, I'm responsible for all staff rotas as well as most of our in-house training, as well as all this I am the main facilitator for all Person Centred Planning as well as all staff education on the subject and I earn, with my weekend/unsociable hours enhancements approx. 20,000 p.a which is about 11 p.h. ( approx. $14 i think) We do well within the NHS within the private sector nurses earn around 25% less than we do.
    So, sorry to rant on but if our government paid more attention to retaining their present highly skilled, highly qualified nurses rather than conning students and non practicing nurses into service than maybe the NHS would be in a better position than it is now.
    Phhewwww, a good rant always makes me feel better....
    Lisa

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