Evidence-Based Practice...your thoughts - page 2

by ThePrincessBride

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What do you think of this move toward Evidence-Based Practice in nursing? Has your place of worked pushed you to integrate EBP into your patient care? It is a hot topic and my school is really advocating for EBP, stating if you... Read More


  1. 0
    Yup, EBP is here to stay. We use it everyday in hospice.
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    im only in my 1st year of nursing. i find EBP has it's place in nursing but accessing the info while on the wards is virtually impossible. i also find it useful for other modules such as sociology as you can relate EBP to the conformity or unionship between nurses on our wards. this in turn creates concepts for change and there is a lot of change happening lately in the psychiatric services.........
  3. 1
    Quote from ThePrincessBride
    What do you think of this move toward Evidence-Based Practice in nursing? Has your place of worked pushed you to integrate EBP into your patient care? It is a hot topic and my school is really advocating for EBP, stating if you do not perform EBP, you are guilty of performing malpractice.Do you agree with this?
    The more I think about this, the more I think it's unfortunate your school is suggesting that there is a 'move' towards EBP - as if the concept is something new. It seems to be suggesting that it's only very recently that nurses have been interested in knowing that there's a reason for what they're doing, and considering whether or not what they do is beneficial and of proven benefit.

    As you can see from the responses so far, it's not something new, it's always been there. I think your instructor's statement 'if you do not perform EBP, you are guilty of malpractice' is meant to make you think and question what you see and do, but it's a very provocative way of approaching the topic. I see more and more students who seem to almost expect to find outdated or poor practice (some even go looking for it) and are surprised if they find 'best practice' - this can only lead to conflict between students and working nurses.
    RNperdiem likes this.
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    Everything we practice is evidence based if you think about it. It really is the best practice and if your protocols are written to EBP then if you don't follow them, yes, you are liable.
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    A really good example is backflushing the secondary tubing into an empty piggyback bag then reusing the secondary tubing set again for tthe next piggyback as long as the primary fluid is compatible, of course.

    Evidence says its all good and will reduce BSI. reduce cost, etc....

    Many of the senior nurses on my floor however refuse to reuse secondary tubing no matter what....
  6. 0
    yet another example is scrubbing the hub......new evidence says that one should scrub for 10-15 secs and let dry an equal time before hooking up.

    The old-schoolers give it a one microsecond once over and hook up so fast all they are doing is spreading the bacteria around......

    So.........

    Even more is dressing changes........many of the dressing changes that I was taught to do using sterile technique are done in my hospital using clean technique. The claim is that doing them sterile did not significantly effect client outcome......

    The list goes on and on
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    I agree that it is probably the new "buzz" as previous posters had said. I don't have any qualms with it other that it seems a little pretentious. I just hope that it doesn't devovle nursing or medicine in to some brain dead step-by-step check list or "this-or-that" type of care administration and kill off good interventions or creative solutions to problems because they're not EBP(TM) approved yet.
    CompleteUnknown likes this.
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    EBP is something we SHOULD have been doing all along. However, we have NOT actually been doing it consistently or well.

    If you get beyond the introductory level of EBP, you'll see that it involves a much more rigorous consderation of the the evidence -- both research evidence and non-research evidence -- than has been typically done in the past. Think about it ... a large percentage of the nursing population doesn't even take a research class in school. They don't have the knowledge to understand / evaluate many of the research articles out there. Lots of nurses only "skim over" the statistics and other technical elements within a research article because they either don't understand it or don't value it.

    In reality, many (most) decisions have been made (and policies written) without a rigorous literature review. At best, there is a cursory look at a few recent articles chosen because they are readily available. In other words, they don't really evaluate the quality of the articles of the articles they read -- they either accept them or not based on whether it seems reasonable to them. ("Yeah, that sounds like a good idea. Let's try that.")

    Having a formal EBP process in place is forcing people to do a better job of living up to the standards we always said we believed in. EBP is not perfect. It has its limits. But for most clinical settings, it's a big step forward.
    chare likes this.
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    We had an EBP unit-based council. It was in full swing during our magnet evaluation 2 years ago....

    Really though, I was into it.
  10. 0
    Quote from mindlor
    A really good example is backflushing the secondary tubing into an empty piggyback bag then reusing the secondary tubing set again for tthe next piggyback as long as the primary fluid is compatible, of course.

    Evidence says its all good and will reduce BSI. reduce cost, etc....

    Many of the senior nurses on my floor however refuse to reuse secondary tubing no matter what....
    I have back flushed IVPB for years.......maybe it is the just the nurses that you work with that are reluctant to embrace change


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