Ethics Violation-Would you remain silent or challenge the system? - page 3

Today I was labeled a "whistleblower and tattletail because I, along with numerous other students, witnessed a table of individuals cheating on an exam in our Anatomy and Physiology class which is a... Read More

  1. by   PurrRN
    This scenerio is just an example of what I percieve to be one of the biggest problems in our society. The willingness of some people, to overlook the specific wrong action of a person (group of people) and shift the blame or responsibility onto others. It doesn't matter what the personal motivation was for the reporting of the cheating was,........it was the CHEATING that precipitated the reporting. If they hadn't cheated, they wouldn't have been reported..........period. Integrity isn't something that suddenly appears when there is a big enough dilemma for it to be applied to. It is built by doing the right thing in smaller situations in life, such as: to cheat or not to cheat!!! I think it's a sad commentary of modern life that there is ANY question directed at the motivation behind someone's reporting of a wrong action instead of focusing on the wrong action itself. Just my , and believe me, I would have been right behind the OP giving my account of the incident.
  2. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    It may sound selfish, but i'd report it, and keep going till something got done about it. Why? 1) i couldn't live with the fact that i saw something wrong, yet did nothing, 2) the people that cheated could possibly be my nurse someday.

    Those aren't the only reasons, but i wouldn't want a cheater being the one responsible for taking care of me. If they'd cheat on a test, who's to sa they wouldn't cheat on pt. care?
  3. by   AlabamaBelle
    [quote=Angie O'Plasty, RN]Honey, if you can't take a failing grade because you either weren't able to get an A or you didn't study, you have no business being a nurse.

    Cheating is just one symptom of not being able to cut it, at whatever level.

    And no, I never did cheat. I was the nerd on the end of the front row keeping my paper covered.[/quote

    ]:yeahthat:

    I, too, am that nerd. I did report cheating in high school. I wasn't popular to begin, but I know what I did was the right thing.

    Cheating on tests is a symptom of cheating in or at life. I pray that I never have an RN who cheated or that any of my family members do. I've taken my licks and owned up to my mistakes and learned from them.
  4. by   Daytonite
    i'm standing with many of the others who are on the side of the op in support for reporting the cheats. i also say that cheating is indicative of the potential to go on to falsify records, lie about medication errors and omissions and the list could go on and on. these are things that could result in most nurses getting fired from their jobs, when or if discovered, and possibly having their licenses taken away by their state board of nursing! there are patterns to people's behavior. as a manager i can tell you that one of the first things employees will point out is other employees who work around the rules because it is unfair to everyone else. they will want and expect maverick employees to be stopped. it's no different in a school situation with cheaters. i don't want someone without honesty and integrity working for me or with me.

    of even greater interest to me, however, was the response of the cheaters. to boldly accost the op and threaten them is an indication that these cheaters are aggressive (not assertive--there is a difference) and may also harbor some violent tendencies. they obviously can't control their emotions and went out of their way to attempt to bully the op. i'd sure hate to see them transferring this kind of behavior onto a helpless patient who wasn't complying with a doctor's orders or who was refusing to following facility rules because they were confused, elderly, or in some way cognitively impaired. state boards of nursing and public health are constantly on the alert for individuals like this who slip through the cracks and end up with licenses working in facilities where they could do potential or actual harm to it's citizens.

    in addition to notifying the school's department of nursing and naming names, i would urge the op to also report this confrontation initiated by these cheaters to the campus security department, if only to get it documented. this kind of aggressive and confrontational behavior is not a desirable characteristic in a potential healthcare professional.
  5. by   icugirl33
    I agree with you 100%..You are right, the nursing program is a limited access program. If you are going to cheat to make it in, you probably won't pass the program anyways. Why give seats to cheaters who will most likely not make it out and by chance they pass, will end up hurting a patient.
  6. by   AlabamaBelle
    Daytonite:

    As always, you have hit the nail on the head!!!!!

    Cindy, RN
  7. by   BSNtobe2009
    I went to one college that had a "cheating" policy that I did not consider cheating. I define cheating as not coming up with the answers yourself. If you come up with them, it's your work.

    This one college, if you took a class again as a repeat, and the professor gave out an assignment again, if you referred back to your old notes or old tests they considered that cheating...I totally disagreed.

    It's still their original work, and if the professor is dumb enough to give out the exact same test or assignment again b/c he's too lazy to draft up another, then yeah for the student for being a good record keeper.
  8. by   donsterRN
    Quote from reebok
    I will respond to you b/c so far you have had the best answer or reply to my controversial statement. I agree with you. But for a student who cheats on a A&P test alone does not mean that he will automatically cover up med-errors or falsify documentation and the student who earned his grade wont. You could look at it in a different way. That cheater may be more likely to double, triple check when administering meds or often seek help from other nurses to avoid certain mistakes.

    My question for you is Can you honestly say that you've never cheated on a test? Not the whole test maybe 1 answer. from pre-k to bachelors degree.

    And if you are a person with that much integrity. Certainly you've never made a med error or falsified documents or covered up any mistake throughout your whole nursing career. Every nurse has made a mistake. And admitting up to it at the right time is when ethics is involved. What I meant by prioritize: It's a pre-req.,professor doesn't care. In the actual Nursing school it matters. There are M.D.'s who have made straight A's their entire life and have never cheated but fail when it comes to ethical delimmas. Trust me a pre-req. test is not the best determination for ethical standards. I would hope a criminal record would be weighted more heavily.
    I'm not certain I'm following your logic, but I believe that someone who cheats and gets away with it is likely to continue the practice.

    You can add me to the list of people who have NEVER cheated on a quiz or exam; all of my grades are my own.

    There are indeed trust issues, and nurses repeatedly rank at the top of the list of professionals with the highest levels of trust by the general public. Nursing school is tough, and people who cheat usually do not succeed when it comes time to actually know something.
  9. by   reebok
    symptom of not being able to cut it, at whatever level.

    And no, I never did cheat. I was the nerd on the end of the front row keeping my paper covered.[/quote]

    For all the self-proclaimed nerds: I noticed no one admitted to never falsifying documents, making a med error or covering up a mistake their whole nursing career. Can anyone of you confess that underoath? Im talking to the well seasoned nurses so newbies dont bother responding.

    The truth of the matter is that you can't be that judgemental. So you all can just get off that high horse of yours. I live in the real world. No blood, no foul.

    And as far as
  10. by   AuntieRN
    I commend you for reporting the cheating. It does show you have integrity and I would have done the same thing for the same reasons. Heck it is really hard to get a slot in a nursing program, why should someone be able to cheat their way in when there is someone waiting who will really work hard to get where they want to be. Cheating is wrong no matter who is doing it or how you look at it.
  11. by   Jolie
    Quote from reebok
    symptom of not being able to cut it, at whatever level.

    And no, I never did cheat. I was the nerd on the end of the front row keeping my paper covered.
    For all the self-proclaimed nerds: I noticed no one admitted to never falsifying documents, making a med error or covering up a mistake their whole nursing career. Can anyone of you confess that underoath? Im talking to the well seasoned nurses so newbies dont bother responding.

    The truth of the matter is that you can't be that judgemental. So you all can just get off that high horse of yours. I live in the real world. No blood, no foul.

    And as far as[/QUOTE]

    Why are you so determined to champion the wrongdoers? I'd be willing to bet that even the cheaters would acknowledge that what they did was wrong (privately, or within a group of their peers). If a cheater does not believe that what s/he is doing is wrong, then why hide and sneak? Why not just get up with their test papers and go sit next to the class brainiak and openly ask for answers? Because even they know it is wrong. Doesn't stop them from doing it, but they know it is wrong.

    So, do you not know that cheating is wrong, or are you just unwilling to acknowledge it? Sounds almost like sociopathic thinking.

    Add me to the list of geeks and nerds who earned my degree without cheating, who self reports med errors, who doesn't call out sick on sunny days, who pays my taxes, who returns to the store when I discover an unpaid item in my cart, and who teaches my children to do the same.

    I believe that character is reflected by how we behave when we know no one else is watching.

    May you never find yourself coding, and be forced to rely on a nurse who cheated his/her way thru ACLS.
    Last edit by Jolie on Nov 11, '06
  12. by   reebok
    I know someone out there still disagrees with me. So here goes my last attempt to try to get you all to understand. Let's think of a possible real life situation.

    For ex: Sally, an only child, has just experience the 1rst death in her family. Sally lost her only parent who was her father. She remembers her father being extremely proud of her for going back to College. She's going through the grieving process as well as experiencing financial problems. Sally has 3 kids and the kids' father doesn't help to support them. Two of three kids she have are experiencing trouble at school academically. The reason why she didn't study was b/c she was busy helping them with their homework. Although Sally is currently working full-time to meet ends-meet, she has recently received threat of an eviction and 3 red letters saying some utility will get cut off or car repossessed. She cheated but after she got the answers she went back over the test to understand the material. She cant justify the cheating but right now shes at a time in her life when she could loose everything. She could loose her car, house, fuure, kids and mind.

    Let's say the cheaters were expelled b/c you reported that incident. She was expelled and lost her Faith. Was it worth that woman's children quality of life. Was it worth her living the rest of her life struggling to take care of herself.
    Prioritize: Is reporting the cheaters for a pre-req test that important?
  13. by   Daytonite
    Oh, for the love of mike! Yes, it is that important to report the cheaters. In your example, SHE'S the one who dug her own hole, not the people who reported her. SHE'S the one who sacrificed her children's quality of life. No one held a gun to her head and forced her to do what she did. It was her own free will and choice. She could have gotten tutoring. She could have gone to the dean and asked to take a leave of absence from the program until she got her personal life back on track. The point is. . .if you want to work in the system then you work with the system not around it. Going around the system to suit your own needs is unfair to all the other people who are part of the system and waiting for the same service. The importance is that it speaks volumes about Sally's character and virtue. I don't think you will understand this unless you become a manager or a parent and find yourself in the role of having to make some serious decisions about hiring people or deciding who your children can associate with. Symptoms cannot be ignored. They are like arrows pointing the way to answers and solutions, dude! Cheating on exams is a symptom of a bigger disease that the person has.

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