The Ethics of Managing Your Personal Time - page 2

Thereís a lot said about ethics in nursing, and much of it -- most of it, probably -- pertains toward the ethical treatment of patients. Not charting meds you havenít given or procedures you havenít done, admitting your med... Read More

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    I can't count the number of times I've been asked "so and so is going to be 'sick' on wednesday, will you be able to cover?" Please people, switch shifts with people or plan ahead.
    nurse.sandi likes this.

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    My own father died and I had to work. They were so great to me..they let me off to attend my only father's funeral. I do not know if this makes a difference but he was 52 years old and passed unexpectantly. Come on.. they couldn't find a replacement and I did not hear any of my coworkers trying to change shifts with me. Shame on me...lucky I did not know what I know now. Experience will change your life.
    Last edit by nurse.sandi on May 4, '11 : Reason: addedum
    Chin up and wooh like this.
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    Quote from megan_EMT
    I can't count the number of times I've been asked "so and so is going to be 'sick' on wednesday, will you be able to cover?" Please people, switch shifts with people or plan ahead.
    Is going to be sick....? I totally understand your point. I guess I can predict three days from now I will be sick. Unbelievable...but after some of the things I have been through...I believe it.
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    Quote from caliotter3
    Very good article. Reminds me of the time when all the employees of a nursing home attended a Christmas party and left one nurse and one CNA to take care of the 172 residents. That one was obviously a blatant disregard for the poor people who made the employment there possible.
    I would be up the wall ..and hysterically crying. I honestly would not know what to do.
    Poi Dog likes this.
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    Yes, RubyVee, but - as you stated, some policies are so unreasonable and contradictory that only a dead saint could follow them.

    It seems the height of insanity to hire a nurse, train a nurse, orient a nurse, spend all that time and money - and then harrass the poor nurse when it comes to needing sick time for personal or family illness.

    I know some people take more time off than others. I know someone has to replace the MIA nurse.

    Still, there really are times when a nurse might need more than 3 sick days per year.

    Don't sing the virtues of Managers and Administrators, either. They are not being punched and kicked, spat upon, etc. in the ER or Psych ward. They are not on the front lines caring for those with respiratory contagions.

    Some workers have no kids or their kids or grown or their dog doesn't require long walks - ever- or they never have any household malfunction issues.

    Yes, we should be considerate of our coworkers, but they and our bosses need to realize that sometimes life just happens. What other industry demands that people work when sick? Yes, I'm sure there are times when bosses in any outfit can be very demanding regarding attendance, legitimately. But insisting that people use only 3 sick days per year anc come in with the flu? At least, it doesn't seem to happen in the movies or TV shows that portray life at the law firm or the bank.
    Chin up and Teacher First like this.
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    Quote from mindlor
    well one of the main concepts of ethics is Veracity (Truth).

    Lets all just tell the truth... Hey boss, I would like to go to the wedding....I am willing to use PTO. if you could find a temp or prn to cover me I would appreciate it.

    As a manager its more the lying that bothers me than anything else. What else are they lying about?

    ps, if ya come in spewing various microbes willy nilly, I would send ya home, please dont come to work actually sick.....

    If someone lies to me I ccant trust them. if I cant trust me I cant have them working for me........

    Lots of nurses looking for jobs.....just sayin....
    Yes, the lying is bad - but understandable. After all, you would definitely spend hundreds of dollars, maybe thousands, on agency staff or PRN's so all your truthful nurses could go to the event. Right?

    Lots of nurses looking for jobs? Yeah. And very costly to fire all of your experienced ones and start over with new ones.

    There has to be a happy medium. And telling people not to come in spewing sickness? That approach is nearly unheard of. What if it's a long-term illness and your staffing is desperate. Would you be that generous? Lots of places are not. Kudos to you on that.
    wooh likes this.
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    Quote from nurse.sandi
    My own father died and I had to work. They were so great to me..they let me off to attend my only father's funeral. I do not know if this makes a difference but he was 52 years old and passed unexpectantly. Come on.. they couldn't find a replacement and I did not hear any of my coworkers trying to change shifts with me. Shame on me...lucky I did not know what I know now. Experience will change your life.
    You are so right, Sandy, experience does change us. I'm really sorry about your father and your hateful bosses insisting you come to work at that horrible time. It sounds like something that survivors of Auschwitz have described. They arrived by train after several days and nights of being in those cattle cars - no food, no water, no toilet, maybe even standing up the whole time, stench indescribable, no air circulating, summer heat, winter freezing - after all that, they arrive and are greeted by SS men screaming orders and ny snarling, barking, growling German shepherds, and are ordered to "schnell" (hurry up, go faster) to jump down and get in lines and go to the left or the right - to life as a concentration camp inmate or to the gas chanbers and ovens. Families forever split up, children screaming as they are torn from their mother's arms, some babies tossed into the air and caught on bayonets before their parents' eyes.
    Those chosen to live were put to work or put into a reception area, perhaps in the open, exposed to the weather, whatever it might have been. Soon, an inmate worker, trying to help, trying to tell them what to do to survive, whispers to them about the all-pervasive, nauseating smell being burning flesh and the smoke rising from the smokestacks being their parents or their olde, or sick or youngest loved ones.

    With no time to mourn, maybe numb from the shock of all this terrifying evil, they must still follow any orders given and behave in a way that will not call undue attention to themselves and must begin life in the face of great odds of dying a death of torture, quick or slow.

    Your horrible boss telling you you had to work instead of having a few days off to deal with the shock and grief and practical concerns of your father's sudden death made me think of the above. I'm so sorry you had to deal with that. I hope you will never again allow yourself to be treated like that. Just say "I'm in shock, I cannot think straight. I'm sorry you are inconvenienced, but I will not be in. Goodbye."
    Last edit by Kooky Korky on May 8, '11
    Chin up likes this.
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    Quote from dajulieness
    I would be up the wall ..and hysterically crying. I honestly would not know what to do.

    Well, I think that would be a good time to tell the boss I was suddenly ill, make myself vomit on her feet, and pretend to faint! Or insist that she and a couple of other workers had to stay and help.

    In other words, do not accept such a ridiculously impossible assignment.

    Then, also call off on Christmas Day.
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    Of course no one likes to work on days like Christmas... but think of how your patients must feel, they are in the hospital on Christmas...
    Elisheval likes this.
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    I don't get why retaliatory call-offs could ever be a good strategy. It will hurt the patients/residents and management will not suddenly decide they give a crap. If someone was going to get the most sought after Holiday with Christmas off - dunno - I think maybe that young mother or dad who actually puts forth the effort to manage their time and their life, should be rewarded for it. That way, people are less likely to resent that person when the unexpected happens, as it always does with young children.

    Never have a I seen a nurse who cares about her co-workers be met with the cold shoulder for a truly unexpected event/sickness. In fact with that type you sometimes have to shoo them out the door!

    I've worked with both types, so the idea that simply being a parent makes selfish last minute call-offs inevitable just is not true. Buy yeah. The slackers usually do end up with the better part of the deal. There's always something or someone else to blame.

    The statement - and then harrass the poor nurse when it comes to needing sick time for personal or family illness. contains a false assumption to me as you don't "need sick time" you get sick. We still have FMLA, don't we? I'm sure it isn't perfect but it was designed with the intention to address this issue, among others.because the complaint is not about inadequate benefits. It's about chronically thoughtless individuals who are able to party without thinking about what they've burdened the responsible people with, as well as patients getting poorer care on an understaffed unit.

    I've worked agency (no benefits) for quite a while so I had no idea the average paid sick time is now 3 days a year. Just hearing that nauseates me. As I recall my last f/t place had 1 sick day per month, rotating holidays off and double time for working them, plus 2 floating holidays per year. First yr pd vac> 1 week/ year 2-4>2 weeks/ year 5-10>3 weeks/ year 10+>4 weeks. If you didn't use your sick days they paid you for the time at the end of the year. It was cumulative as well.
    Chin up likes this.


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