Ethics: Does it bother you when people are in nursing to make money? - page 8

I just wondered if others as I do feel there are some in our line of work who look at money, security of earnings first rather than having a passion for their patient's welfare or wanting to work at... Read More

  1. by   CaLLaCoDe
    Quote from happydays352
    Nurses make a decent amount of money in my area. Around 27 to start and with shift differentials that could push me up to 30. I make 10 an hour, and 80 for a 12 hour sleep shift so yeah that's a lot of money to me.
    I love care giving it doesn't pay very well but I love it. Nursing is not about care giving anymore so I will be leaving a job I love for one that will pay more and be more intellectually stimulating. Yep poop will still be a part of my job and I will get paid more to clean it up.

    Nursing is a real job, they are professionals. Nuff said.
    I beg to respectfully differ. Caregiving does still exist in nursing. Even one on one care at the bedside with RN and CNA working hand in hand. I deal with poop, impactions, colostomy bags...etc etc...and please don't forget to when you get your RN!
  2. by   happydays352
    I should clarify I was referring to the lack of pt contact. Of course I will continue these basic care giving tasks but the emotional care giving I can provide to my pt now will decline. I have no problem doing the dirty work of nursing what I will miss is the amount of time I spend with people now. I spend most of my day talking to my pt's I see them almost every minute of the day and I have time to hug them and hold their hand. I know how they like their coffee, the color of their wedding dress, I know their children grandchildren, nieces and nephews. When I become an RN that isn't going to be the case anymore and I will miss it tremendously. Not trying to be depressing just trying to be realistic.
  3. by   CaLLaCoDe
    Quote from happydays352
    I should clarify I was referring to the lack of pt contact. Of course I will continue these basic care giving tasks but the emotional care giving I can provide to my pt now will decline. I have no problem doing the dirty work of nursing what I will miss is the amount of time I spend with people now. I spend most of my day talking to my pt's I see them almost every minute of the day and I have time to hug them and hold their hand. I know how they like their coffee, the color of their wedding dress, I know their children grandchildren, nieces and nephews. When I become an RN that isn't going to be the case anymore and I will miss it tremendously. Not trying to be depressing just trying to be realistic.
    Sorry, HappyDays!

    I really did not read the rest of your original post earlier...I just saw the part that stated nursing is no longer caregiving...please forgive
    Last edit by CaLLaCoDe on Nov 20, '07
  4. by   happydays352
    No worries!
  5. by   Athenas83
    It sure as heck costs money to become a nurse!
  6. by   rn undisclosed name
    Is it any worse when someone goes to school to become a teacher so they can have the summer off? Perhaps they don't have a real interest in helping the kids and are just looking forward to the summer off but yet they still have to collect a paycheck.
  7. by   Kevin RN08
    Quote from kellykul
    Is it any worse when someone goes to school to become a teacher so they can have the summer off? Perhaps they don't have a real interest in helping the kids and are just looking forward to the summer off but yet they still have to collect a paycheck.
    Or perhaps they don't even like kids.
    This was exactly one of my points earlier. Teachers, accountants, engineers, whatever you do if you don't carry some passion for your profession it will eat you up. You won't be proficient, nor successful. Teaching is a great example, a young person goes to college to be a teacher "for summers off", they get their degree and certifications and are out of the profession, "burned out"(hate the term), in 5-7 years. They didn't consider the administrative burdens, the disrespectful children and parents, the time it takes to lesson plan, and so on. For them the negatives no longer out weigh the positives, and isn't that the end point? Getting satisfaction in what you do, being able to put up with the parts you don't enjoy because of what you do enjoy. I would hope that in Nursing it is the same, when you get to your threshold of dis-satisfaction you move on, whether that is to another dept, another hospital, home health ... or another field.
    Last edit by Kevin RN08 on Nov 21, '07
  8. by   catlynLPN
    Quote from TeleRNer
    I just wondered if other as I do feel there are some in our line of work who look at money, security of earnings first rather than having a passion for their patient's welfare or wanting to work at finding ways to improve their performance as a nurse.

    Any thoughts? Comments? Rants?

    Well, I have to eat. I have bills to pay.
    I want to be the best nurse I can at what I do, but I still have to have the money, and I like it when I get a raise, and bonuses.
    I'm trying to build up my income in order to build up my rate of social security and retirement.
    I see nothing wrong with that. I go to work and look out for my patients, and I have to look out for myself because someone has to do it.
  9. by   empress04
    i took up nursing because it's an exciting profession... big salary is a bonus...
  10. by   Scrubby
    I became a nurse because i have always found health sciences fascinating. And yes because I wished for a career with opportunities to earn money and advance professionally.

    I don't have any problems with people who are in nursing solely for the money as long as they are competent and provide for their patients. We all have to eat.

    If they reduced my wages or simply didn't provide pay increases then i may reconsider nursing but I really do love my job.
  11. by   Agnus
    Quote from Kevin RN08
    Teaching is a great example, a young person goes to college to be a teacher "for summers off"
    I know a lot of teachers would have a field day with this statement. Having the summer off for teachers amounts to being unemployed for 3 months of the year.

    This is one of the stupid assumptions the public makes about teaching that teachers hate.

    Who in their right mind goes into a profession for the express purpose of being unemployed for 2-3 months every year?

    Give those young people who become teachers credit for more intelligence and insight that this.
  12. by   TonyFl
    Great Article....sounds like some type of rationalization process for accepting lower pay scale. Could even be used to manipulate people.



    Quote from multicollinearity
    This thread reminds me of studies that have been done on cognitive dissonance and careers.

    You know - the studies go something like this: 20 participants are paid $5 to do a boring and unpleasant task (rated boring and unpleasant by overwhelming margins in other samples) and then they fill out a survey regarding the meaning and level of enjoyment. 20 other participants do the exact same task, but they are paid $50, and then they fill out the same survey regarding the boring/unpleasant task.

    Who rates their boring/unpleasant level most accurately? The higher paid group. This has been duplicated many, many times. It is cognitive dissonance regarding work. The lower paid group will always rank their task as quite meaningful, etc. The mind has to inject the perception of extra meaning to explain why we would do such things for low pay/bad treatment.

    When people are paid fairly and treated well, they tend to perceive their conditions more accurately.

    I would think this could have implications for nursing. Anytime I hear nursing related as a 'calling' by someone I think of this. Savvy and scheming leaders know that the way to get someone to work harder for them is to treat them poorly and pay them little. The worker will respond with cognitive dissonance and unconsciously attach extra meaning to their work to bridge the dissonance and work harder.

    Many people leading large groups know this. Religious leaders know this, and so do political leaders, etc. I think of this sometimes when I read about nursing being a 'calling' and all of the halo 'angels of mercy' stuff.
    Last edit by TonyFl on Nov 23, '07
  13. by   CaLLaCoDe
    [font=courier new]message from the op


    i feel that some people just don't get it regarding the thread i started from the get go! i don't mean i want nurses to earn zip; i don't want martyrs. no! i want nurses to earn as much as they are deserved of and more! what gets me is that some folks entering this field are looking at nursing as a career choice for stability and yes the money, however not reasoning within their head that this job is very hard, takes stamina, requires one to endure mental fatigue and keep on going like the energizer bunny, requires one to be diplomatic at all costs and not lose one's cool, is not an easy money making career choice, none whatsoever. so, whoever assumed this thread is about people earning nothing for doing honest to god very hard and sometimes unthanked work is crazy and needs to consider the main thrust of this thread rather than assume its all about the money, ok!? cheesch!
    Last edit by CaLLaCoDe on Nov 23, '07

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