Ethics: Does it bother you when people are in nursing to make money? - page 7

I just wondered if others as I do feel there are some in our line of work who look at money, security of earnings first rather than having a passion for their patient's welfare or wanting to work at... Read More

  1. by   Dental Hygienist
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    I've looked into dental hygiene in order to get out of nursing. The problem is the mkt is saturated w/ RDHs in my area, just as it is w/ RNs.

    I can't believe someone would leave the better hours, better pay, and a whole lot less responsibility of dental hygiene to be a nurse.
    In my area RDHs are in great demand. I can pretty much name my price and hours. But I'm not bragging; it is a very monotonous job; you're expected to "sell" dentistry as opposed to just focusing on th patient's needs. Bottom line is I feel no satisfaction from my job. I feel even less respect and appreciation. I'm a goal oriented person; and there is nowhere for me to go; no lateral or upward movement. I just can't imagine being stagnant in my career for another 35 years; and I truly want to feel like I'm making a difference (not to claim nursing is a calling for me....I just want to make a difference).

    Anyways; that's my explanation and I'm stickin to it!:spin:
  2. by   CaLLaCoDe
    Quote from cloister
    Well, I'm kind of afraid to admit it, but I consider nursing my calling.

    Simply put, it's where I'm most apt to encounter the sacred, and after 20 years I still consider myself privileged to be a nurse and work with people in their worst moments.

    That being said, let me hasten to add that I make about 4X what I did as a new grad. I accept every penny of it. I won't be turning down any raises, either.

    I remember raising my hand as a sophomore in our "Intro to Nursing" class to ask the ICU RN guest speaker about salaries in critical care. I thought the head of our department, whom we called "Atilla the Nun", was going to stroke. I guess she couldn't see how a 20 year old with no intention of joining a religious order could possibly be interested in money. I was already thinking of the family I hoped someday to raise, and as one of our previous posters so aptly put it, altruism won't pay the bills.

    I will say that there isn't enough money minted to make the job worthwhile if you don't like people on some level. Some nights, I'm convinced there isn't enough money minted, period, depending on what comes up from the ER or who's on call!

    So, yeah, it's my "calling", but it's also paying for my kid's gymnastics and putting money in my retirement fund. It's turned out to be a pretty darned lucrative calling, and I'm glad I chose it!
    I am glad you put into words what I was looking to hear (read that is) that there are those of us that appreciate the money, however feel that being a nurse is a rewarding and uplifting career choice. My feeling is that those of us who are unhappy nursing, but do a very good job at it, very concientious indeed, may not be where we aught to be. May not be truly happy being the nurse. May prefer to be a stock brocker or a realestate agent. However, nursing as a career choice is stable and other careers are less stable, perhaps more risk but more monetary profit. We are in demand. The chosen few who could find work at the drop of a hat if let go from the employer we now presently have. Again thank you. And to the one who was an aid at a time prior to nursing: I too felt very rewarded as the aid with little money to compensate my war (work!) efforts. And so, in summary to this thread that could possibly reach to the moon, thank you to all for participating; and sorry if I rubbed a few people wrong. I love the money and the stability of nursing. I love the rewards of having families with big smiles appreciate what I do. I love having an MD understand that I see him as part of the team and not the enemy. I love seeing western medicine work, really work to save somebody from death's door.
    Everybody have a terrific Thanks Giving. Enjoy it! Remember, I have to work those nights; but, I'm not complaining, I will be well compensated lol
    Last edit by CaLLaCoDe on Nov 20, '07
  3. by   pinksugar
    It does not bother me when people are in nursing to make money. Nursing is a job. The point of a job is to make money.

    I don't understand why this subject always comes up. Why should we not be paid? I feel that I give good care and I like being reimbursed monetarily. I have bills to pay, and sometimes I like to buy myself things that I want. If nursing didn't pay I wouldn't be doing it, and there would be an even larger nursing shortage.
  4. by   Kevin RN08
    I recently retired from the Navy and am currently in an ADN program. When I desided to change careers I looked at what I enjoyed (teaching and carring for others). I also considered going into education but, saw the "life expectancy" was like 7 years and had questions of my willingness to commit to that profession. This left nursing, the pay is better, more variety, flexibility is better, don't get summers off, but can pick up and move and not worry about finding work. And if practice doesn't agree with me I can take my Nursing education and RN license and put it to use outside of a hospital.
    In my 10 person class we have an average age of 34, 1 MBA, 2 psych techs (1 w/ MS, 1 w/BS), 1 who managed grocery stores, 1 bar-restaurant manager/bartender, and me. Thats 6/10 who are second career ... granted, 2 are lower end.
    Bottom line is that we all are looking for our own best interest finacially. But if you are in ANY profession just for the money you probably won't be too successful in that profession, and at the least you will be miserable.
  5. by   santhony44
    Quote from cloister
    Well, I'm kind of afraid to admit it, but I consider nursing my calling.

    Simply put, it's where I'm most apt to encounter the sacred, and after 20 years I still consider myself privileged to be a nurse and work with people in their worst moments.

    That being said, let me hasten to add that I make about 4X what I did as a new grad. I accept every penny of it. I won't be turning down any raises, either.

    I remember raising my hand as a sophomore in our "Intro to Nursing" class to ask the ICU RN guest speaker about salaries in critical care. I thought the head of our department, whom we called "Atilla the Nun", was going to stroke. I guess she couldn't see how a 20 year old with no intention of joining a religious order could possibly be interested in money. I was already thinking of the family I hoped someday to raise, and as one of our previous posters so aptly put it, altruism won't pay the bills.

    I will say that there isn't enough money minted to make the job worthwhile if you don't like people on some level. Some nights, I'm convinced there isn't enough money minted, period, depending on what comes up from the ER or who's on call!

    So, yeah, it's my "calling", but it's also paying for my kid's gymnastics and putting money in my retirement fund. It's turned out to be a pretty darned lucrative calling, and I'm glad I chose it!

    :yeahthat:

    Well said!

    When I say that nursing is a calling for me, that is in no way a comment on anyone else's motives. Others don't feel the same way and I don't have a problem with that. As IMustBeCrazy said, "As long as a nurse can perform their job competently, leaves drama at home, treats patients well and is not a department liability, I could care less about the exact reason that led them into nursing."


    Also, when I say nursing is a calling, I'm not saying nor implying that I've taken a vow of poverty. I'm not sure why saying that you were called to something seems to indicate that you're OK with being taken advantage of or underpaid. I always think of the verse in the Bible that says "workers deserve their wages." There is, however, more to it for me than just the money.
  6. by   RosalindRN
    I have a real problem with the people who are only in it for the money. I agree that money is important when choosing your career and I think that we should be compensated well for what we do. But if you went to nursing school b/c you wanted to get $30 and hour, travel but you dont think you can actually physically touch and care about another persons feelings, then you shouldnt be a nurse. Thats disguisting to me. I dont want you standing over me while I'm sick and not want to change my brief because you didnt go into nursing to clean. (it comes with the job description) Not everyone has to do it but you shouldnt think you are above it. I know nurses who got into nursing for THE MONEY, who always call for the CNA to clean their patients bc they dont want to clean poop. Meanwhile, while you are waiting on the CNA who has 18 other patients to care for...
    Last edit by sirI on Nov 20, '07 : Reason: TOS
  7. by   happydays352
    I'm going to be an RN primarily for money until I can be an NP, I also work as a caregiver. I clean up poop everyday! There are always lazy people, lazy nurses who won't clean up poop who are in it for the "right" reasons. The source of motivation doesn't=quality of work.
  8. by   katie258
    I'm sorry, you guys earn money for this poopy job? I really need to get out of Australia and start making some cash....Trust me if I wanted money I'd go find a real job. Nursing is a passion and an interest, not to mention I work in a small town and I get all the goss first hand....
  9. by   CaLLaCoDe
    Quote from katie258
    I'm sorry, you guys earn money for this poopy job? I really need to get out of Australia and start making some cash....Trust me if I wanted money I'd go find a real job. Nursing is a passion and an interest, not to mention I work in a small town and I get all the goss first hand....
    Dear Katie,

    I am an American and have no idea what the term goss means. Hopefully it means cashola. Or perhaps the rubies in the poop!
  10. by   katie258
    goss = gossip. Although just to make it very clear I am a huge keeper of secrets. Pt. confidentiality and all that. my husband is always getting up me because his friend will be in at work and he doesn't find out untill they are out again and telling him that I looked after them. Goss is no fun if you have to share it anyway, you get a certain satisfaction knowing what others don't...or is that just my twisted way of looking at the world?
  11. by   happydays352
    Nurses make a decent amount of money in my area. Around 27 to start and with shift differentials that could push me up to 30. I make 10 an hour, and 80 for a 12 hour sleep shift so yeah that's a lot of money to me.
    I love care giving it doesn't pay very well but I love it. Nursing is not about care giving anymore so I will be leaving a job I love for one that will pay more and be more intellectually stimulating. Yep poop will still be a part of my job and I will get paid more to clean it up.

    Nursing is a real job, they are professionals. Nuff said.
  12. by   callmekipling
    Quote from TeleRNer
    I just wondered if other as I do feel there are some in our line of work who look at money, security of earnings first rather than having a passion for their patient's welfare or wanting to work at finding ways to improve their performance as a nurse.

    Any thoughts? Comments? Rants?


    Alright, I admit it, I do not love nursing. I do it for the big bucks, the low stress and the chicks.

  13. by   adria37
    I work for pay. I think the nursing profession has been its own worst enemy and kept pay low compared to the amount of work and responsibility demanded from them. Think about it, money is important to garbage men (no offense) and plumbers (no offense) and they are better compensated than most nurses. How often in male dominated professions do you hear it discussed that compensation is not important?

    I am a highly educated professional who is a nurse. I do not consider it a calling or something decided by a superior being. I work for compensation so I can live and provide a home for my son not because of some "unknown" need to get out of the bed at 5:00 am and give my time and energy to someone besides my family.

    If I did not do it for the money, I would be called a volunteer. Volunteer work is great and needed however, I need compensation at this point of in my life. When I hear a nurse say, "Oh, I don't do it for the money, I do it because I want to help people" I cringe.

    My opinion is that this statement devalues what we do. We are educated professionals providing a service and should be compensated accordingly. My thoughts are if you don't do it for the money then be a volunteer. I have a family to support.

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